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What's the Strangest Thing You've Eaten

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mr drinky

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I was recently on vacation and I saw a termite nest and remembered that I ate termites while in Trinidad four years ago. The guide during a hike poked his finger in a nest and termites flowed out, and he said they were edible. So I liked my finger to make it slightly adhesive, captured a few, and ate them.

To this day, I still strangely crave termites. They had a very strong herbal taste, and the taste remained in my mouth for close to four hours. It was sort of like a super-charged Ricola cough drop.

k.
 

jm2hill

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I feel like I've eaten just about everything minus endangered species. I love travelling and heading back home. Always new foods to try.

I love ostrich burgers and giraffe biltong is also superb.
 

Andrew H

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Wow, definitely not competing with this crowd.
 

jm2hill

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I'll add something similar to fermented whale blubber.

I wasn't pleased about this one and I would never ever do it again. Fermented raw sheep's heart/liver/lungs (Haggis) but it was yet to be cooked.. I hate Scotland.
 

Andrew H

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I didn't know haggis was fermented before it was cooked. Makes me want to eat it even less.
 

jm2hill

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I don't believe its meant to be. But my scottish friends are not normal. I try not to hang out with them to much. :)
 

ecchef

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Horse sashimi. I used to do a Robbie Burns night with the haggis. It's pretty good with a large whiskey.

Fermented whale blubber wins.
 

mr drinky

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Btw, if you live in the DC area Jose Andres' restaurant Oyamel has crispy grasshopper tacos. It isn't that bizarre, but different enough to make you think twice.

k.
 

PierreRodrigue

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I know this is a weirdest thing you ate thread, but I damn near got tricked into eating Prairie Oysters. If they were a different shape, they woulda fooled me!
 

tk59

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...I damn near got tricked into eating Prairie Oysters...
:rofl2:

I guess wierd is in the eye of the beholder. I guess fermented squid (that's what I was told) would be the grossest. Live (or at least still moving) sea urchin is definitely interesting. Some cheeses are downright raunchy but I couldn't tell you which they were. Some people think durian is pretty nauseating...
 

NO ChoP!

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I worked with a Filipino girl who brought Balut to work.... it's cooked eggs with a developed embryo. Did I eat the entire thing? No....but I did taste it.
 

Andrew H

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I worked with a Filipino girl who brought Balut to work.... it's cooked eggs with a developed embryo. Did I eat the entire thing? No....but I did taste it.
New front runner perhaps.
 

Eamon Burke

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I dunno. I've eaten several of the things mentioned, and they aren't nearly as freaky as they seem. I can't think of anything like andrew zimmern eats.
 

jheis

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Chocolate covered bees and fried grasshoppers are about as strange as I've gone - or intend to go....

James
 

tk59

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I worked with a Filipino girl who brought Balut to work.... it's cooked eggs with a developed embryo. Did I eat the entire thing? No....but I did taste it.
My brother loves those. I've choked down a couple 'cause I was hungry but I think I'd rather go out and dig up grubs.
 

jm2hill

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Apparently fried worms taste like bacon? Anyone want to confirm or do a taste test?
 

sachem allison

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I give up! You already win!
:biggrin:A while ago I used to be real big on the pow wow circuit, traveling around the country making and selling knives and traditional regalia and jewelry and I made a lot of friends from different tribes. Since I made extremely traditional old school crafts and medicine pieces using stone and bone tools, I made a lot of friends amongst the medicine men and women and the elders. I was making things the way that their grandparents and great grandparents did. This was considered a very honorable thing to do as the younger generations didn't want to learn these old crafts and they began to die out with the elders.
:DWell, one day I met a Makah Medicine man and Thee mask carver for the tribe and he asked me to make some beaver tooth chisels and a whalebone d- adze for a special project he was doing for both the Makah Nation and the Smithsonian. I told him that it would be a great honor and that I would do it just for that reason only. We shook hands and that was a done deal. A few months later after collecting everything I needed I finally was able to present him with the finished pieces. That's when he told me what the pieces where for. It seems that the Makah were finally going to be allowed by the federal government to hunt a whale using traditional methods. Wooden canoe and handmade shell tipped harpoon. My tools were going to be used to make the adornments on the canoe and some of the gear. Well they went out and got their whale and it was the first one in over seventy years i believe.:thumbsup:
After winning the right to continue a tradition that the tribe had been doing for thousands of years there was a huge celebration. The whale was divided up amongst the tribal members and a giant feast ins-sued .:knife: A couple of weeks later the Medicine man and a few tribal elders showed up at a show I was doing and presented me with a gift. A nice big chunk of two week old fermented whale blubber. They unwrapped it from its skin wrapper, right there at the show table and began cutting off chunks and passing it to me to eat. What can you do, when elders bring a gift like this you smile and choke it down. It was rough. I ate four pieces before I realized that they were waiting for me to offer them some, which I gladly did. I made sure that they ate all the rest, the generous host that I am.

Taste: Think old stinky sardines mixed with bluecheese,salmon oil, rotted rancid fat, toasted almonds and the consistency of a slimy rubber band and you might , just might have an inkling of what this tasted like. I imagine if it was fresh it might not have been so bad, but leaving it in a bloody seal hide wrapper in the sun for two weeks and only brushing off the maggots from the surface really makes it special.:puke::puke:
 

JohnnyChance

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So what you're saying is....it's not going on your menu any time soon?
 

PierreRodrigue

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Fantastic story! I have tried a few thigs considered traditional by some of the local Cree Nations. Most were very good! Pemmican, preserved fish and meats that sort of stuff. Ate my fair share of seal at home when I was young, mom considered it a treat. VERY rich, to the point, it would make you sick if you ate too much. To much of the fatty oils, and vitamins and minerals forund in fish, I can't remember them all. Very nutritous is small doses.
 

mr drinky

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I've had lutefisk. It was eaten by the barrel where I came from. I'm surprised you didn't put fermented rakfisk on your list. I've never had it in the US, but the last time I was in Norway in one meal I had lutefisk, rakfisk, and whale. That was quite a trio.

k.
 

oivind_dahle

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Ah forgot rakefisk.
Whale was normal when I was young, however I don't like it :)
Norway was once a very very poor country, until we found oil (lucky bastards). Lots of Americans have norwegians grand grand parents, as lots of norwegian almost starved to death and therefor seeking luck in USA.

So in the old days, lots of different food was eaten. Some more tasteful than others.

Congrats on rakefisk and lutefisk. Guess you had alcohol to it :)
 
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