Yo gyuto recommendation

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by Domas, Dec 1, 2019.

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  1. Dec 1, 2019 #1

    Domas

    Domas

    Domas

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    Hi all,

    I am considering buying new yo gyuto knife. Here are my questionnaire answers.

    LOCATION
    Lithuania (EU)

    KNIFE TYPE
    Yo gyuto, ie Japanese chefs knive with western handle

    Are you right or left handed?
    Right

    Are you interested in a Western handle (e.g., classic Wusthof handle) or Japanese handle?
    Yes, it seems to feel somewhat more ergomic in my hand

    What length of knife (blade) are you interested in (in inches or millimeters)?
    I believe 210mm should be enough when using knife just at home

    Do you require a stainless knife? (Yes or no)
    Yes

    What is your absolute maximum budget for your knife?
    150-300 EUR/USD

    KNIFE USE
    Home

    What are the main tasks you primarily intend to use the knife for (e.g., slicing vegetables, chopping vegetables, mincing vegetables, slicing meats, cutting down poultry, breaking poultry bones, filleting fish, trimming meats, etc.)? (Please identify as many tasks as you would like.)
    Slicing, mincing and chopping vegies and fruits, slicing meats, filleting fish. No very hard tasks - there will be another, probably some German, knive for this purpose.

    What improvements do you want from your current knife? If you are not replacing a knife, please identify as many characteristics identified below in parentheses that you would like this knife to have.)
    Better food release is more than very welcome (convex grind?).

    Comfort (e.g., lighter/heavier knife; better handle material; better handle shape; rounded spine/choil of the knife; improved balance)?
    I do not like very light knives. For a 210mm gyuto, 150-200gr (around 5-7 oz) seems to be optimal weight for me.

    Edge Retention (i.e., length of time you want the edge to last without sharpening)?
    The longer, the better.

    KNIFE MAINTENANCE
    Do you sharpen your own knives? (Yes or no.)
    No, I plan to use sharpening service.

    SPECIAL REQUESTS/COMMENTS
    Just to sum up preferred features - western handle, good food release, good edge retention and not very lightweight. I do not care about the knive type - whether it is laser or semi-laser - I believe good knive features matter most regardless of its type.

    After doing some research in this forum and some other sites, I have added following models to my consideration list so far:
    1. Ryusen Blazen Gyuto 210mm SG2 (BZ-104)
    2. Tojiro R2 SG2 Gyuto 210mm
    3. Takamura HSPS Pro Gyuto 210mm

    Any experiences and comments regarding to those models as well as the new additions to the consideration list are very welcome!

    Thanks,
    Domas
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2019
  2. Dec 1, 2019 #2

    mack

    mack

    mack

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    labor of love likes this.
  3. Dec 1, 2019 #3

    daddy yo yo

    daddy yo yo

    daddy yo yo

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    The Blazen is a fantastic knife, I have the 240 and love every single bit of it!
     
  4. Dec 1, 2019 #4
    You mention that you plan to use ‘sharpening servis’ - are they capable to sharpen thin, high hardness blade properly or will just run in on something like a Tormek or even belt grinder? That would be a major point for me as it makes no sense to get a high quality knife and have it fooled up by someone who has no clue.
     
    Benuser likes this.
  5. Dec 1, 2019 #5

    Domas

    Domas

    Domas

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    Hi Matus,

    that is a very good point indeed. There are few knive sharpening specialists out there, but I am not aware about their competence. I just see that one of them claims to use Naniwa Chosera and Shapton Ha No Kuromaku water stones and all customer reviews are very positive. Anyway, I will try to call them and ask whether they can properly sharpen such quality knive.

    Meanwhile, if I won't find who can do that, what would you suggest? To look into German brands like Wusthof or Gude?

    Thanks,
    Domas
     
  6. Dec 1, 2019 #6
    Hi Domas, you’re welcome. You have basically 2 options:

    1) Send to the sharpener a normal knife and have it sharpen on stones - and see what kind of result you get. Talking to him is definitely a good idea.

    2) Keep part of your budget for 2 stones (something like 1k and 3-5k) and learn how to sharpen. It is not that hard and will definitely make more sense in the long run.

    When it comes to knives - I am having hard time to find a knife that would have western handle and fit your requirements. The Ryusen is probably the closest match. I can not really comment on the geometry or performance. But Ryusen knives are higly regarded.
     
  7. Dec 2, 2019 #7

    captaincaed

    captaincaed

    captaincaed

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    My ryusen R2 has quite good edge retention and top notch finishing details. Harder to sharpen (as a learning sharpener) - need to be patient deburring. Can't comment on food release since it's a petty.
     
  8. Dec 3, 2019 #8

    krx927

    krx927

    krx927

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    Why do you have preference for Western handle? Did you try Japanese handle first hand? I would not say that they feel worst in the hand.

    When I was buying my first J knife I also selected Western style handle but my reasoning was that in the long run most likely Japanese wooden handle will get damaged. Later i started to buy kniveswith j handles and i like than much more. The knife sits in the hand much better than Western handle. The raw wood helps grip the in the hand.

    My worry about handle not being durable is also nonsense. They keep very well. And if by any chance they will get destroyed, they are eady to replace.

    Few more comments: like Matus is saying I would also suggest buying sharpening stones. It's relatively'easy' to sharpen a knife.

    Blazen is ok knife but I find it a bit expensive for performance. For same price or lower you can get better knives with Japanese handle. Plus the SG2 steel is harder to sharpen, the feeling is not there and it takes more grinding.
     
  9. Dec 4, 2019 #9

    Domas

    Domas

    Domas

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    Hi Krx,

    I just kept Japanese handle in my hand few times in the shop and even have not worked with it yet. It just feels a bit different since all my life I've used Western handles, but the more I dig, the more I am open to try Japanese handle.

    If considering wa gyotu, what are the recommendations? Also, apart of a good food release, mid weight (oriented more towards a "workhorse" type than a "laser"), and good edge retention, I would prefer stainless cladding due to better rust resistance.

    Thanks,
    Domas
     
  10. Dec 4, 2019 #10

    krx927

    krx927

    krx927

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    Then it is no brainer, Toyama SS clad on JNS. One of the best knives out there.
     
    Matus likes this.
  11. Dec 4, 2019 #11

    Domas

    Domas

    Domas

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    Out of stock and bit over the budget :( anything else?
     
  12. Dec 4, 2019 #12

    daddy yo yo

    daddy yo yo

    daddy yo yo

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  13. Dec 4, 2019 #13
    Do try BST - a stainless clad 210 could be just within your budget or very close.
     

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