Yoshikane SKD Santoku... I Might Want One...

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My experiments have slowly been teaching me that for my general purpose knives, I like shorter lengths, flatter profiles, and slicier grinds that don't flex under a finger nail. I also like bunkas.

I've had my eyes set on a Makoto Kurosaki R2 180mm bunka but you guys, um @M1k3, in particular with all your Yoshikane talk had me scrolling back through listings on this lazy Sunday.

So, me and the santoku... I've always like the profiles and in general the sizes but... Man this is hard to admit... As much as I'm a function over form guy, that sorta sheep's foot end just never really appealed to me and I think has largely kept me away. Enter the bunka. Essentially the same thing but looks so much cooler. I know, I know... I can admit my hypocritical shortcomings... Although, I did rationalize it with that not entirely inaccurate assertion that a bunka tip is quite thin.

Okay, with confessions out of the way, I've refocused on my function side and I really like knives thicker spines near the handle that then taper out fast and that aspect on the Yoshikane really drew me in. That and it's reputation for being a great slicer make this an incredibly attractive prospect.

I'm not in a rush yet, but after the start of the new year...

 

tcmx3

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try and get one with the chestnut handle.

Yoshi's chestnut is the best handle. yes, even better than Heiji burnt chestnut IMO.
 

Delat

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The yoshi santoku always looked like more of a gyuto profile to me anyway - much more curve/belly towards the tip than I normally expect in a santoku. Either that or the extended yoshi flat spot makes their gyutos sorta santoku-ish, so they meet in the middle like a gyutoku or santoyuto.

By coincidence I should have one arriving in the mail tomorrow, let me know if you want to see any specific pics or measurements.
 
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The yoshi santoku always looked like more of a gyuto profile to me anyway - much more curve/belly towards the tip than I normally expect in a santoku. Either that or the extended yoshi flat spot makes their gyutos sorta santoku-ish, so they meet in the middle like a gyutoku or santoyuto.

By coincidence I should have one arriving in the mail tomorrow, let me know if you want to see any specific pics or measurements.

Thanks. That's very nice of you. I would be interested in just your overall thoughts and impressions of it. :)
 

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About Yoshi Santoku profile...

Profile.jpg


I agree with @Delat that is has a lot of things in common with a Gyuto. In use, it's a pure push cutter in my sense. The slanted profile and height and and killer heel "tip" and thinness BTE of it to me did not suit any rock chop or pull cuts so much (found it awkward with both) although it can be done for sure. If it wasn't for rather poor food release, and modified or not with a rounded heel according to use, it'd be the ideal Santoku/Bunka/short tall Gyuto sort of crossing. If not handling large quantities, it also works splendidly in mostly chopping motion. To me the most laser of Yoshikane tried because of the height - grind is pretty tall with this one and God it seems anything you cut isn't there. Nimble and precise for detailing too. Awesome tip breezes through onion horizontals - or else and such.

This the 180mm unit.
 
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About Yoshi Santoku profile...

View attachment 155079

I agree with @Delat that is has a lot of things in common with a Gyuto. In use, it's a pure push cutter in my sense. The slanted profile and height and and killer heel "tip" and thinness BTE of it to me did not suit any rock chop or pull cuts so much (found it awkward with both) although it can be done for sure. If it wasn't for rather poor food release, and modified or not with a rounded heel according to use, it'd be the ideal Santoku/Bunka/short tall Gyuto sort of crossing. If not handling large quantities, it also works splendidly in mostly chopping motion. To me the most laser of Yoshikane tried because of the height - grind is pretty tall with this one and God it seems anything you cut isn't there. Nimble and precise for detailing too. Awesome tip breezes through onion horizontals - or else and such.

This the 180mm unit.

Thank you. That sounds exactly like what I'm valuing in a knife these days.
 
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I have one and while I treat it too rough for the thin edge :rolleyes: it takes the wicked edge yoshikane is known for and is super handy for smaller boards. I think it’s got ideal measurements since it’s tall enough for great knuckle clearance but just enough rocker at the tip that mincing herbs is smooth.
 
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I have one and while I treat it too rough for the thin edge :rolleyes: it takes the wicked edge yoshikane is known for and is super handy for smaller boards. I think it’s got ideal measurements since it’s tall enough for great knuckle clearance but just enough rocker at the tip that mincing herbs is smooth.

And how does it respond to your rough treatment?
 

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In my use I've seen edge deformation rather than chipping. Happened when topping off a bell pepper and there was a hard baby one inside and I hit it square through the stem. Seem to remember a couple of similar cases where there was more deformation than real chipping. Of course remember clearly reported cases of chipping also. :D

I wasn't babying it but wasn't roughing it. This how thin it was.

Choil.jpg
 
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In my use I've seen edge deformation rather than chipping. Happened when topping off a bell pepper and there was a hard baby one inside and I hit it square through the stem. Seem to remember a couple of similar cases where there was more deformation than real chipping. Of course remember clearly reported cases of chipping also. :D

I wasn't babying it but wasn't roughing it. This how thin it was.

View attachment 155108

Thank you. I'm always concerned with a need to baby edges. I know I straddle a bit of a tight rope in liking slicey blades that aren't too sensitive.
 
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I have nicked up the edge and only use ceramic rods for it. Actually remarkable durability since I use it twice a week to slice spuds and onion and chop COOKED bacon on a crappy hard poly board. There are two small chips but otherwise it’s hanging in. If you’re wondering why I treat it like this it’s to remind me not to be afraid to use the nicer knives (albeit much more respectfully). It started as an experiment and became a habit.

100% would buy again. And won’t be getting rid of it. Just fits a role perfectly
 

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Not at all it's rather a question of what steel you choose. And what you like for retention and sharpening ease. And how slicey it does need to get, yeah. Yoshi SKD is a good compromise with all. You don't NEED to keep it THAT thin neither, and/or can play with sharpening angle a bit too.

I mean I loved Konosuke HD2 for that: could hold an edge some (but not exactly its forte), easy to touch up or sharpen, and I called it my laser workhorse because yeah it's no workhorse but it could be roughened and left aside to rot and do pretty at it.

52100 - tested from Shi.Han - is tough as nails. No superb retention but somewhat better than many carbons at the same RC.

Ginsan is mighty tough too and not difficult to deal with.

All these I love but then again don't mind about the little extra sharpening time they require for all being no stellar edge holders, while no slouch also.

You can abuse a laser of these steels alright.
 
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I have nicked up the edge and only use ceramic rods for it. Actually remarkable durability since I use it twice a week to slice spuds and onion and chop COOKED bacon on a crappy hard poly board. There are two small chips but otherwise it’s hanging in. If you’re wondering why I treat it like this it’s to remind me not to be afraid to use the nicer knives (albeit much more respectfully). It started as an experiment and became a habit.

100% would buy again. And won’t be getting rid of it. Just fits a role perfectly

I completely agree on use. I won't have a knife I have to baby. Respect is one thing, babying is another.
 
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