Help Identifying Inherited Chef's Knife

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Ldema025

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Hey Guys,

A little back story, I will try and keep it short - I inherited my Nonnina's knives a few years ago after she had passed. Not very well off, my grandmother was rich in stories of our family, who we are, and where we came from. Her father emigrated from Italy to North Carolina with his three brothers, where they worked as a chef's and took Americanization classes, eventually settling in Manhattan. I assume that a few of my knives were passed down from my great-grandfather. I can see a partial stamp on the chef's knife but can't find any other info. Any help dating or identifying the knife would be much appreciated!
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Chuckles

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Cool knife. Looks like the handle is in pretty good shape considering how used it looks. I like the tapered tang. Do you know who has been maintaining it?
 

McMan

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You're a fortunate dude--that's a beaut! Knives like these are some of my favorite French knives. Simple but with clear craftsmanship.
What's the length? Sometimes these were called Lobster Splitters (or lamb splitters) if they are longer. It's a kitchen knife (not a professional butcher's knife) used for breaking stuff down. That tapered tang is great--such a nice taper for such a stout knife.
This is a knife that was meant to work. You can tell by the peened rivets--most French chefs knives used birds-eye rivets, which were harder to insert/finish, and looked nicer. Knives like yours and slimmer petty-like knives used to break down small stuff and poultry (called "Office" knives) would have peened rivets and no bolster--because they were working knives. (This said, it's possible that is not the original handle.) Also, the ripples at the spine are dead-give-aways that it's been hit with a mallet to get through product.
Good find. Keep it. You'd be hard-pressed to find someone who'd actually pay you what that standard of craftsmanship's worth.
 

Ldema025

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Cool knife. Looks like the handle is in pretty good shape considering how used it looks. I like the tapered tang. Do you know who has been maintaining it?
Thanks for the Reply! This knife is an absolute work horse and heavy as hell! I can only assume it hasn't been touched in years, my grandmother suffered from dementia for sometime before passing and was unable to cook. With that aside the knife has maintained a really sharp edge, I've yet to attempt sharpening mainly out of fear of damaging. I did put some teak oil on the handle because of how dried out the wood was.
 

Ldema025

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You're a fortunate dude--that's a beaut! Knives like these are some of my favorite French knives. Simple but with clear craftsmanship.
What's the length? Sometimes these were called Lobster Splitters (or lamb splitters) if they are longer. It's a kitchen knife (not a professional butcher's knife) used for breaking stuff down. That tapered tang is great--such a nice taper for such a stout knife.
This is a knife that was meant to work. You can tell by the peened rivets--most French chefs knives used birds-eye rivets, which were harder to insert/finish, and looked nicer. Knives like yours and slimmer petty-like knives used to break down small stuff and poultry (called "Office" knives) would have peened rivets and no bolster--because they were working knives. (This said, it's possible that is not the original handle.) Also, the ripples at the spine are dead-give-aways that it's been hit with a mallet to get through product.
Good find. Keep it. You'd be hard-pressed to find someone who'd actually pay you what that standard of craftsmanship's worth.
McMan, Thank you for all of the information! The knife has a 10" blade. I agree, the knife production wise is a little rough around the edges, with the hammer marks on its spine and peened rivets. Which in my opinion gives the knife all of its character. It definitely has some heft to it! I'm happy to have shared it with you all and will certainly be hanging on to it as it has become some sort of family heirloom.
 

McMan

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McMan, Thank you for all of the information! The knife has a 10" blade. I agree, the knife production wise is a little rough around the edges, with the hammer marks on its spine and peened rivets. Which in my opinion gives the knife all of its character. It definitely has some heft to it! I'm happy to have shared it with you all and will certainly be hanging on to it as it has become some sort of family heirloom.
Have fun using it! Such a cool knife.
The hammer-marks are from use not production. Somebody was hanging it with a wood mallet to help it get through product. This is seen a lot on working knives used to break down proteins.
 
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