Ideas to mount thin synth

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Ruso

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I have couple synthetic stones that became quite thin with use and its a trouble to use a stone holder with them now. Any tried suggestions on how to mount them on something permanent to be able to calmp the stones onto the stone holder?
 
From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life,
Whose misadventured piteous overthrows
Doth with their death bury their parents' strife.



What you have there is two halves of a combi.
 
Haven't done this with stones, but I've mounted balsa/basswood pasted strops onto thick acrylic that I bought, cut to the size I needed, from an eBay vendor. Rubber cement worked fine for my case, but perhaps you'd want something tougher for a stone.
 
From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life,
Whose misadventured piteous overthrows
Doth with their death bury their parents' strife.



What you have there is two halves of a combi.
Thats a good idea in general but one stone is SnG and another is permasoaked.
Also, what kind of glue would you recommend?
Haven't done this with stones, but I've mounted balsa/basswood pasted strops onto thick acrylic that I bought, cut to the size I needed, from an eBay vendor. Rubber cement worked fine for my case, but perhaps you'd want something tougher for a stone.
Thick acrylic is intresting idea and should work with permasoaker as well. Not sure where I can buy locally though.
Do you think epoxy is better option for stone?
 
Thick acrylic is intresting idea and should work with permasoaker as well. Not sure where I can buy locally though.
Do you think epoxy is better option for stone?
Can't go wrong with epoxy, sure. But there are a lot of adhesives stronger than rubber cement to choose from. Anything with a bit of gap-filling quality should do.
 
I mounted a Naniwa Pro 400 and a Naniwa Pro 1k to wood with contact cement, and it has worked well for me.
 
not the cheapest option but for thin stones I really like the nanohone plates.

tbh I am usually mounting jnats though so the price makes a bit more sense. that said, they do what theyre supposed to do.
 
Thats a good idea in general but one stone is SnG and another is permasoaked.
Also, what kind of glue would you recommend?

Thick acrylic is intresting idea and should work with permasoaker as well. Not sure where I can buy locally though.
Do you think epoxy is better option for stone?


What @Rangen said - epoxy is pretty good for everything really, though other glues will work depending on your backing.

I also mount stones on wood quite a lot, which looks nice and is dead simple. And the idea of the kind of clear acrylic people use for balsa strops is a good one too, cos obviously you'll be able to permasoak if you want. It's rather clever actually, I hadn't thought of that before.
 
Oh and - if you use epoxy on acrylic I'd rough the surface up beforehand. It will bond to smooth plastic, but a little less well than other materials.
 
20220530_021003.jpg
20220530_021003.jpg


I just use 2 part epoxy. The 5 minute clearweld jbweld works fine. Or you can get something like g flex, or bsi mid cure.

I'll get a 2x4, but and sand to shape make sure its flat. Make sure the surface of the stone is clean, and dry. Then spread a liberal amount, and weight it down or clamp it.

Do your best to make sure the stone doesn't move around, and get glued on all crooked. It's very easy for that to happen.

If the stone is all in one piece I'll slide the stone around on the wood a bit to help even out the epoxy before dried.

The stone in the picture was done to save it after getting dropped, and broken into a few pieces. Generally a stone will hold like this until it's couple millimeters thick. Then it will start cracking under the weight of normal sharpening.


I think I've got a thread called stone burial ground, that shows how far you can take a stone that's been attached to a base.
 
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