26C3 san mai WIP

Discussion in 'HSC /// Knives' started by HSC /// Knives, May 23, 2019.

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  1. May 23, 2019 #1

    HSC /// Knives

    HSC /// Knives

    HSC /// Knives

    Professional Craftsman

    Joined:
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    So I ordered some of the 26C3 from @Alpha Knife Supply and so did my friend Gilbert M.

    Gilbert had ordered some and said he was thinking about making some san mai with it.
    While I'm a big user of laminated steels, I've only made it once and I wanted more exposure to it. Gilbert has done some san mai work so I jumped at the chance.

    We were unable to procure 410 ss cladding stock in time so we went with AEB-L as it was readily available and inexpensive. So here is what we did and what I learned so far. I'm no expert, I'm just conveying what we/I did,

    we used two bars of 26C3, .078 thck, one bar of aeb-l clad per side
    I'm used to the core being about 33% of the total thickness, so this san mai was different for me in that sense.

    executive summary, this work was done yesterday Saturday
    1) forge weld in controlled forge with ribbon burner - 2250 F
    2) material was simple and easy to work with
    3) we normalized cycled the steel after drawing it out, my overall bar (core centering) was not as good as Gilberts due to my limited power hammer skills
    4) I used my standard process anneal practice of dull cherry red and into ash - result was the steel was hard and not annealed, difficult to saw, difficult to drill, not sure why.... Will have to use different anneal technique.
    5) I HT using my standard practice for Hitachi laminated steel, heat in forge, quench in water, flash temper.
    6) no problems cracking or delam in water quench
    7) The hardened blade would not straighten easily as I'm accustomed to of Japanese laminated steels I'm used to working with. I had to beat on it hard with a brass mallet on wood stump, really hard. I did finally get it to straighten.
    7) grain structure of the core appeared very fine.
    8) the rockwell hardness of the core seemed high
    9) Im certain I cracked the core during straightening, I'm not surprised, I hit it pretty hard.

    added -
    I ground the blade down until the cracks were gone leaving me with a 9 1/4" long blade, becoming a long petty/sujihiki.

    my personal conclusions for me based on my working with laminated steel with Hitachi core.

    1) this steel is harder to sharpen, not hard to sharpen, just harder than Hitachi white or other simple carbon steels (with Japanese waterstones)
    2) I used alot more belts to grind
    3) the edge is very sharp, super scary sharp
    4) I'm excited to use this tonight on chicken and carrots
    5) I didn't like the etched finish and will go with a kasumi style finish
    6) I think we used too thick of a core and would advise a thinner core in the future of about 33% total thickness



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    Gilbert's bar




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    water quench


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  2. May 23, 2019 #2

    HSC /// Knives

    HSC /// Knives

    HSC /// Knives

    Professional Craftsman

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Clarkdale AZ
    I cracked the blade again at the very last minute trying to straighten a slight bend in the spine.
    I ended up with a very nice 6" prep knife with lignum vitae and rosewood frame handle

    Harbeer

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  3. May 23, 2019 #3

    bryan03

    bryan03

    bryan03

    Well-Known Member

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    Messages:
    239
    why using this steel for cladding ? ( I know, you do not have 410 or 316 or...) but with this amont of C and CR ... after forge welding you have a crap structure inside ,and you lose all the benefit of cladding here.
     
  4. May 23, 2019 #4

    HSC /// Knives

    HSC /// Knives

    HSC /// Knives

    Professional Craftsman

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    Hello Bryan, AEB-L was all we had at the time, it was mostly an exercise to work with the 26C3 carbon steel.
    I've ordered some 410 for the future.

    Actually I think the forge welding went very well and the structure inside is quite intact.
    It was a fun little project and a way for us to try out the new carbon steel

    regards
    Harbeer
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2019
  5. May 23, 2019 #5

    bryan03

    bryan03

    bryan03

    Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]


    the cladding here do not looks very healthy :D
    no big deal if for the next time you use free carbon SS steel.
     
  6. May 23, 2019 #6

    HSC /// Knives

    HSC /// Knives

    HSC /// Knives

    Professional Craftsman

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    no it doesn't, agreed
    but the core looks great, and that's what we were after.
    There are different ways to measure the success of a project experience, I got alot out of this and that's what was important to me

    Harbeer
     
  7. May 23, 2019 #7

    bryan03

    bryan03

    bryan03

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    "but the core looks great, and that's what we were after."

    yes,
    but, not only, the proof here, you lose all the mechanical interest of sanmai construction.
    you have a cladding more brittle than the core.
     

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