Demeyere Atlantis and induktion.

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HappyamateurDK

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Hi all.

This might very vel be my first ever non-knife post on this great forum. I'm pretty sure it is. 😊

I'm looking for a new 28 cm saute pan, it will be used on a Electrolux induction cooktop.

I'm really close to ordering a demyer Atlantis. It should be very effective on induktion. But some users claim it to be almost too effective so it's difficult to keep it down at low heat simmering.

It's a bit expensive peace of gear. So before ordering I would like to ask if any of you guys in here have any experience using the Demeyere Atlantis products on induktion? Is it good or is it actually hard to controle at low heat?

Have a nice weekend.
 
I had an Atlantis a while back. A very nice pan. What I didn't like was that where the wall met the bottom was 90-degrees. Functionally in use, this meant is was very difficult to get a utensil in there. I got rid of the pan for this reason. (This might be the nature of the beast for most disk bottom pans though?)
 
Hi, I have a "22 cm" 3600W as the biggest hob on my AEG induction cooktop.

At least if you have a comparably sized induction cooktop, I would try steer you away from that biggish Atlantis saute and towards a thick aluminum disc pan, such as this Fissler OP 28cm low roaster for example. I have one of these with a flat lid:

1582240528AST_ECOM_SA_113780.jpg

https://www.fissler.com/gb/products/product-detail/original-profi-collection-round-roaster/
This Fissler has an about 8,5 mm total bottom thickness. It can hold a good amount of heat for searing big amounts of protein well on induction, all while having a nice and evenly heated bottom. You can probably find this for less money also and the fit and finish of these is very good and they can be put through the dishwasher no problem. They may not look as appealing as the Demeyere though.

While I don't own the Atlantis saute, for reference I own for example a 24 saute and 28cm frypan in Falk copper core, with their 1,9 mm copper. In Atlantis series I would be most interested about their saucepans for induction.
 
I'm looking for a new 28 cm saute pan, it will be used on a Electrolux induction cooktop.

I'm really close to ordering a demyer Atlantis. It should be very effective on induktion. But some users claim it to be almost too effective so it's difficult to keep it down at low heat simmering.
...
Is it good or is it actually hard to controle at low heat?

i don't think anyone can answer this unless they have the same cooktop you have. it completely depends on how much control/resolution you have over the low range of output.
 
agree with what Sansho wrote, I'm using a Demeyere pro non stick, a Silit ceramic, a Fissler Rondo and some Debuyer Steel pans and my experience is that once the pan is good enough the level of control is driven by the cooktop (a mid range small Neff here, works good but not very ergonomic in use). Mediocrer pan on a good range results in bad heat control IME, no experience with Electrolux induction as this is my first one.
 
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I guess I am bored, but I digged a few old pictures of my Fissler and Falk copper core pans scorching flour on my AEG induction cooktops biggest hob, which is a 22cm "ring" with 3600w (turbo-power setting). These I had originally posted on Chowhound (RIP) in a certain heated thread haha <3.

The pans:

Falk copper core 28 cm sloped fry pan, 1,9 mm copper in the core, the rest ss up to 2,5mm total.
Fissler Profi 28cm straight wall low roaster, about 8,5 mm or so total thickness as I have measured and IIRC also Fissler stated as such for the 28cm straight wall vessels.

First picture is with the Falk Copper pan, heated with some shortening and flour on a medium setting of 6/9 IIRC constantly. Notice how it don't look so good. For anyone who may not know, induction heats in a donut shape, much smaller than the diameter painted on the hobs generally.
Falk 28cm frypan1.jpg


The next picture is with the Fissler pan, using the same setting. There is more flour, but the evenness is very good.
fissler roaster.jpg

The third picture is with the Falk pan again, but heated on a lower setting of like 3,5-4/ 9 or something IIRC. Now it looks much better than in the first picture, but not very good yet still.


falk 28cm frypan.jpg


The Falk is a frying pan, in case it was a straight wall pan like the Fissler and had equal floor diameter, the difference would look worse yet for the Falk.
That said, I have cooked many great meals on the Falk as well and when fully preheated, it can also put up pretty even browning accross the floor eg for steaks or meatballs, at least for a while.

As one can deduct from the pictures, the Falk copper core, or any of the pans beneath it in performance, in the fully clad class (which is everything, except Demeyere Proline) will start struggling more and more though once the preheated energy is gone and we are replacing the heat energy from the induction "donut" in the middle. The higher the setting, the worse it is. Say a bigger bunch of ground beef or chicken slices etc, a steak after the turn. Always better in the thick disc pans.

My wife who is not so into cookware (or knives for that matter :D ) once told me the "you know this Falk isn't heating all so evenly", or something like that, and that pretty much tells the story, really. Or the fact that she often burned food in the center of the Falk, while with a frypan pan like our Paderno GG 11114-28, she would burn the entire bottom :D.

What I mean to say with this post is that the Atlantis sautes with their 2,0 mm copper and 1,7mm stainless, should do slightly better on evennes than my Falk on my cooktop, but not so much.

I like to say that my smaller Falk 24 cm frypan still works pretty nicely for me though on the biggest hob, but most of the time it would need to be used on the smaller ones, so I end up using disc based pans instead of it generally and I prefer them otherwise also, tbh, the heat is better diffused. So for saute and frying pans (and big saucepans also), I have come to the conclusion that I somewhat strongly prefer thick alu disc based, or hybrid pans for induction.

So, I don't mean to say you have a bullet to dodge here @HappyamateurDK , but I would heartily recommend the Fissler for example instead of the Atlantis, and especially so in case you don't have a matching 28 cm or so induction hob to go with the pan. In which case, I believe I would probably still go for the Fissler, had I the chance to compare.
 
I second the vote for the Fissler pro line, interesting comparison! I have a Debuyer stainless lined copper sautee pan that I'm smitten with because it heats perfectly even, finding out all the Fissler pans I got last December do the same was a great bonus!
 
I second the vote for the Fissler pro line, interesting comparison! I have a Debuyer stainless lined copper sautee pan that I'm smitten with because it heats perfectly even, finding out all the Fissler pans I got last December do the same was a great bonus!

Yeah, Fissler Profi are great for induction induction indeed. If I had to choose only one cookware line for induction, it could well be that one. I also have 5 of their saucepans/pots in addition to the roaster/saute. I really like my Lagostina Accademia Lagofusion frying pans though for example.

And nice that you are enjoying the DeBuyer, which model is it btw, and what is the size of the hob you are using it on?
 
I guess I am bored, but I digged a few old pictures of my Fissler and Falk copper core pans scorching flour on my AEG induction cooktops biggest hob, which is a 22cm "ring" with 3600w (turbo-power setting). These I had originally posted on Chowhound (RIP) in a certain heated thread haha <3.

The pans:

Falk copper core 28 cm sloped fry pan, 1,9 mm copper in the core, the rest ss up to 2,5mm total.
Fissler Profi 28cm straight wall low roaster, about 8,5 mm or so total thickness as I have measured and IIRC also Fissler stated as such for the 28cm straight wall vessels.

First picture is with the Falk Copper pan, heated with some shortening and flour on a medium setting of 6/9 IIRC constantly. Notice how it don't look so good. For anyone who may not know, induction heats in a donut shape, much smaller than the diameter painted on the hobs generally.
View attachment 192258

The next picture is with the Fissler pan, using the same setting. There is more flour, but the evenness is very good.
View attachment 192259
The third picture is with the Falk pan again, but heated on a lower setting of like 3,5-4/ 9 or something IIRC. Now it looks much better than in the first picture, but not very good yet still.


View attachment 192260

The Falk is a frying pan, in case it was a straight wall pan like the Fissler and had equal floor diameter, the difference would look worse yet for the Falk.
That said, I have cooked many great meals on the Falk as well and when fully preheated, it can also put up pretty even browning accross the floor eg for steaks or meatballs, at least for a while.

As one can deduct from the pictures, the Falk copper core, or any of the pans beneath it in performance, in the fully clad class (which is everything, except Demeyere Proline) will start struggling more and more though once the preheated energy is gone and we are replacing the heat energy from the induction "donut" in the middle. The higher the setting, the worse it is. Say a bigger bunch of ground beef or chicken slices etc, a steak after the turn. Always better in the thick disc pans.

My wife who is not so into cookware (or knives for that matter :D ) once told me the "you know this Falk isn't heating all so evenly", or something like that, and that pretty much tells the story, really. Or the fact that she often burned food in the center of the Falk, while with a frypan pan like our Paderno GG 11114-28, she would burn the entire bottom :D.

What I mean to say with this post is that the Atlantis sautes with their 2,0 mm copper and 1,7mm stainless, should do slightly better on evennes than my Falk on my cooktop, but not so much.

I like to say that my smaller Falk 24 cm frypan still works pretty nicely for me though on the biggest hob, but most of the time it would need to be used on the smaller ones, so I end up using disc based pans instead of it generally and I prefer them otherwise also, tbh, the heat is better diffused. So for saute and frying pans (and big saucepans also), I have come to the conclusion that I somewhat strongly prefer thick alu disc based, or hybrid pans for induction.

So, I don't mean to say you have a bullet to dodge here @HappyamateurDK , but I would heartily recommend the Fissler for example instead of the Atlantis, and especially so in case you don't have a matching 28 cm or so induction hob to go with the pan. In which case, I believe I would probably still go for the Fissler, had I the chance to compare.
I gotta say that fissler looks like a really good buy. And I would jump it if I could get it locally.

I've decided not to buy the Demeyere. Simply because I doubt the 28 cm base would fit my cooktop.

A 3 option could be this De buyer..it should be 5 clad. And the wife sure likes the look of it. But any of you guys knows if it's any good on induktion?

https://www.debuyer.com/en/stainless-steel-riveted-saute-pan-affinity-814.html
 
24cm is considerably smaller, but the affinity is thin alu clad, I would still not recommend it personally for a pan like that on induction. If there is a 24cm Demeyere it would be better in comparison also..

From debuyer I would rather go with Milady. I have the 24cm frypan in this series. It may not be quite as robust as a Fissler, but comes with a thick enough bottom and looks pretty nice, though the shape differs....:

https://www.debuyer.com/en/stainless-steel-riveted-saute-pan-milady-669.html
But since we now know your wifes style... how about these then:

https://www.lagostina.com/en/product/detail/accademia-lagofusion-shallow-pan-lid-cm-26-925
I might prefer the Fissler myself for a "straight" wall pan, but I love my Lagostina Accademia Lagofusion frypans and am confident these would serve you well.

Generally Fissler, Lagostina and DeBuyer have been available in Amazon europe sites. I have bought from Germany mainly.
 
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24cm is considerably smaller, but the affinity is thin alu clad, I would still not recommend it personally for a pan like that on induction. If there is a 24cm Demeyere it would be better in comparison also..

From debuyer I would rather go with Milady. I have the 24cm frypan in this series. It may not be quite as robust as a Fissler, but comes with a thick enough bottom and looks pretty nice, though the shape differs....:

https://www.debuyer.com/en/stainless-steel-riveted-saute-pan-milady-669.html
But since we now know your wifes style... how about these then:

https://www.lagostina.com/en/product/detail/accademia-lagofusion-shallow-pan-lid-cm-26-925
I might prefer the Fissler myself for a "straight" wall pan, but I love my Lagostina Accademia Lagofusion frypans and am confident these would serve you well.

Generally Fissler, Lagostina and DeBuyer have been available in Amazon europe sites. I have bought from Germany mainly.
I can't find the exact fissler you have.

Du you think this would be good?

https://www.knivesandtools.com/en/p...588-28-000-gratin-pan-with-high-lid-28-cm.htm
 
I gotta say that fissler looks like a really good buy. And I would jump it if I could get it locally.

I've decided not to buy the Demeyere. Simply because I doubt the 28 cm base would fit my cooktop.

A 3 option could be this De buyer..it should be 5 clad. And the wife sure likes the look of it. But any of you guys knows if it's any good on induktion?

https://www.debuyer.com/en/stainless-steel-riveted-saute-pan-affinity-814.html
Thumbs up for Debuyer Affinity line. Its a 5 ply one piece construction and has been a top performer on my AEG induction hob. They don't warp (unlike my Cuisinart French Classic pans) and have great heat transfer (able to set the temp 1 or 2 positions lower for same cooking performance).
 
Thumbs up for Debuyer Affinity line. Its a 5 ply one piece construction and has been a top performer on my AEG induction hob. They don't warp (unlike my Cuisinart French Classic pans) and have great heat transfer (able to set the temp 1 or 2 positions lower for same cooking performance).
Thanks for your input. It's getting harder and harder to chose 😅
 
I can't find the exact fissler you have.

Du you think this would be good?

https://www.knivesandtools.com/en/p...588-28-000-gratin-pan-with-high-lid-28-cm.htm

Hi, yes the first one you posted, and I quoted, is the newer version of my pan, with nicer handles, but with the domed lid. The exterior bottom diameter of my pan is about 26,5 cm and it's the absolute max I can fit on my cooktop, considerable overhang for my hob, but still works great ;).

The second one, the serving pan, has a smaller diameter and somewhat thinner, but adequate disc base. It's the same as their 28cm frypan, but with double handles. Edit. Noticed also it has the dimpled surface... Maybe grab a regular flat surface..
 
Hi, yes the first one you posted, and I quoted, is the newer version of my pan, with nicer handles, but with the domed lid. The exterior bottom diameter of my pan is about 26,5 cm and it's the absolute max I can fit on my cooktop, considerable overhang for my hob, but still works great ;).

The second one, the serving pan, has a smaller diameter and somewhat thinner, but adequate disc base. It's the same as their 28cm frypan, but with double handles. Edit. Noticed also it has the dimpled surface... Maybe grab a regular flat surface..
Do I understand it right..does the serving pan have a thinner base then the saute pan?
 
Do I understand it right..does the serving pan have a thinner base then the saute pan?

Yes, when both are 28cm, that should be the case.

The 32 cm serving and frypans would then have the same base as the 28 cm saute. In equal diameter, the saute is the bigger pan and offers more cooking area and volume, while the smaller serving pan an easier access with utensils.

In more general sense, I suppose it can be in pans like it is in knives, one likes thicker than the other. A thinner pan is more responsive, but at the cost of bottom evenness and heat retention. Experience over a certain period of time will then show what a person likes more, or maybe they want to use both for certain things.

In straight wall pans of 24cm, I already prefer thicker bottom on my cooktop generally, but its not like I would find that my 24cm Falk saute, which I also own would be just BAD on my cooktop. I sure would never get a 28 cm saute from Falk (or any clad manufacturer) for my current cooktop though and I also would not rebuy my 28cm frypan, having the experience that I have now. This hasn't been cheap for me lmao. I did really like my Falks upon arrival, it took a while to start noticing how I wanted to use thicker bottom pans.

I maybe wrong, but I do like to think though, that many using solely induction would start gravitating towards the thicker bottom pans eventually, especially in bigger pans, if they ever go there and compare with some level of thought over longer time. But as always, one likes the grandmother and so on, and maybe one day I go back to using more clad, for reason or another.

Good luck with however you choose, I don't mean to solely push you to a thicccc bottom pan, even if I would be glad to see you doing so, at least should you choose a 28cm size (seems you don't have a very large hob based on your comments).
 
Thanks a lot for all your inputs. I ended up ordering the de buyer infinity in 28 cm. Time will tell if I chose right 😊
 
Yes, but you will still get +6.0mm of aluminum in the bottom, which is probably double of what the De Buyer would offer you.

I'm sure the fissler is a great pan. Unfortunately the wife had something to say aswell. And the design just wasn't accepted 😊
 
Why locally? Weird :)

Affinity cant have more than 2,0mm alu, likely less. In general that is not optimal for a 28cm saute on induction imho, but the sides are not close to vertical and there seems to be much rounding, debuyers often run a bit small also afaik. The flat cooking surface on that pan must be surprisingly small. So perhaps these combined you can like for something. I could see myself using it as a stainless wok (stir frys :D, because stir you must )or for boiling pasta for example.


The accademia lagofusion is a hybrid with a 7 mm or so bottom as they advertise and also aluminum inside the sidewalls. The alu in the sidewalls is thin, but the thick bottom nicely evens it out on the floor and the sidewalls get pretty hot also. The craftmanship is nice.

Maybe order also the Lagostina 28cm from the amazon.de and compare! Then return one if you want?
 
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Well..it might be an unusual opinion. But I prefer to buy locally and support local business. If we all buy online. Sooner or later the physical shops will be gone.

I don't know how thick the bottom is on the affinity. But it is 5 fly. So I assume it will have a bit of material thickness.
 
In more general sense, I suppose it can be in pans like it is in knives, one likes thicker than the other. A thinner pan is more responsive, but at the cost of bottom evenness and heat retention. Experience over a certain period of time will then show what a person likes more, or maybe they want to use both for certain things.

Exactly this. I have a few Atlantis and a single Fissler 28" frypan, also a Mauviel m'cook 5-ply frypan - despite the consensus here, I much prefer the Atlantis over the Fissler (on gas, mind) due to the reduced heat capacity. The Fissler holds too much heat and is not responsive enough (for my style of cooking!); the Atlantis is (in my mind) the best of the bunch, the only downside is that it's heavy (like the Fissler, actually); the Mauviel is the only one you can really flip/toss single handed, it's responsive and heats evenly enough (at some point extra evenness doesn't actually get you anything!).
 
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