KASFLY (CZAR) Ultimate Sandpaper holder

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PappaG

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thanks.
So what are you guys using this for? I'm really, really interested, but I'm not sure how to use sand paper for thinning or other purposes.
 

Nemo

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thanks.
So what are you guys using this for? I'm really, really interested, but I'm not sure how to use sand paper for thinning or other purposes.
Use it the same way you use a stone. Except you change the sandpaper when it stopps cutting properly or when you need a different grit.
 
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I'm 95% sure I'm going to buy this device. Two questions about other possible uses:

1. Could this be used as a stone flattener with either drywall screen and or sandpaper? (if so what would you recommend). Essentially rubbing your stones directly on this to flatten?

2. Would a peice of leather fit in this to be used as a strop? Or would leather not bend properly to clamp in.

Very interested and appreciate your thoughts.
A very late response - was I asleep at the wheel? :confused:
I have used kangaroo leather in the Kasfly. It's fairly easy to fit it but mounting it on a broader and longer piece of timber (or other suitable substratum) is much more satisfying for stropping duties.
 

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Just used mine to thin and restore very damaged edges on a set of old Chigago Cutlery knives for a relative. It's good to be able to go very coarse but I find that anything below about 180 grit feels wierd. 180 is pretty fast, though.
 

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Just used mine to thin and restore very damaged edges on a set of old Chigago Cutlery knives for a relative. It's good to be able to go very coarse but I find that anything below about 180 grit feels wierd. 180 is pretty fast, though.
Subsequent to this, I've used it with 80 grit to repair a deeply chipped knife. You get used to the feeling of the very coarse grit after a while.

Be very careful not to skin your knuckles on the 80 grit paper, though.
 
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