Quantcast

katsuramuki with nakiri vs usuba

Kitchen Knife Forums

Help Support Kitchen Knife Forums:

slowtyper

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2011
Messages
727
Reaction score
0
Now obviously a usuba would be the better knife for this task but for those who have experience with both types of knives, I am wondering how much of a difference it will make.

Lets say vs using a gyuto.
 

echerub

Founding Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2011
Messages
1,979
Reaction score
0
I had been practicing katsuramuki with nakiri and gyuto for about a year. I didn't touch my usuba even once during that time partly out of laziness - reaching for what was handiest and what I was already comfortable with - and partly because I figured I was doing alright with my double-beveled knives.

However, when I picked up my usuba just for kicks and katsuramuki'd a daikon one evening, I was pleasantly surprised at how much easier it was to stay thin and consistent all the way through.

There's not much difference, I find, between a nakiri and a gyuto in this role. As some folks say, a nakiri is like a gyuto without the tip and the belly that precedes it. Honestly you could do the same thing with a suji or a petty. It's not so much a matter of the blade size or profile as it is about its geometry. I find that with any double-bevel, you have to concentrate to make sure you keep the sheet thin without breaking through. The usuba, in contrast, just wanted to keep going where it was. I also noticed that I could get move further along with each stroke when using the usuba.

For me, it's a very noticeable difference between the usuba and any of the double-bevels in terms of the ease at which you can katsuramuki and therefore the speed at which you can go. It's also easier to keep the sheet continuous with the usuba, but it's also doable with the double-bevels.
 

JBroida

Founding Member
KKF Vendor
Joined
Feb 28, 2011
Messages
6,640
Reaction score
783
Location
Beverly Hills, CA
I had been practicing katsuramuki with nakiri and gyuto for about a year. I didn't touch my usuba even once during that time partly out of laziness - reaching for what was handiest and what I was already comfortable with - and partly because I figured I was doing alright with my double-beveled knives.

However, when I picked up my usuba just for kicks and katsuramuki'd a daikon one evening, I was pleasantly surprised at how much easier it was to stay thin and consistent all the way through.

There's not much difference, I find, between a nakiri and a gyuto in this role. As some folks say, a nakiri is like a gyuto without the tip and the belly that precedes it. Honestly you could do the same thing with a suji or a petty. It's not so much a matter of the blade size or profile as it is about its geometry. I find that with any double-bevel, you have to concentrate to make sure you keep the sheet thin without breaking through. The usuba, in contrast, just wanted to keep going where it was. I also noticed that I could get move further along with each stroke when using the usuba.

For me, it's a very noticeable difference between the usuba and any of the double-bevels in terms of the ease at which you can katsuramuki and therefore the speed at which you can go. It's also easier to keep the sheet continuous with the usuba, but it's also doable with the double-bevels.
+1... the difference between nakiri and gyuto (assuming the gyuto is long enough) is small... the difference between those and an usuba is significant. Usuba is much better
 

slowtyper

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2011
Messages
727
Reaction score
0
Thanks guys, exactly what I wanted to know. What do you guys think about the konosuke fujiyama white#2 Usuba?
 

echerub

Founding Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2011
Messages
1,979
Reaction score
0
I've only used one usuba thus far, and it's a Yoshihiro so I couldn't really say much about the Konosuke. Jon will have some good input for you but he might want to go through PM's for that :)
 
Top