Coleslaw with mustard dressing - an unexpected hit!

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KingShapton

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First off, this recipe is based on an American recipe (with slight modifications made by me), so I assume most of the members here already know it, at least in outline. But I still want to post it here because the result is damn good, really good! And maybe it meets the taste of someone who doesn't know it yet.

It's so good that I can't post any pictures, I made the salad as a snack for a small family gathering and the guests left nothing, nothing at all. I have been asked for the recipe several times.

Ingredients for the dressing:

1/3 cup (80 ml) mayonnaise
1/3 cup (80 ml) mustard (here I used 50% Dijon mustard and 50% hot mustard)
1/3 cup (80 ml) apple cider vinegar
1/3 cup (80 ml) sugar
2 tablespoons (15 mL) smoky barbecue sauce
some cayenne pepper
1 1/2 teaspoons oregano


Ingredients for the Slaw Mix:

1/2 white cabbage (approx. 1.1 kg) very finely chopped
4 large carrots, finely julienned
3 onions, quartered and very finely chopped
2/3 cup (160 ml) sugar
1/3 cup (80 ml) salt

After slicing, mix the cabbage and carrots in a bowl and mix well with the salt and sugar mixture.

Let it stand five minutes, then put it in one large sieve and rinse thoroughly under cold running water.

Meanwhile, whisk together the ingredients for the dressing in a bowl.

Dry the rinsed vegetables thoroughly (salad spinner or pat dry with towels), add the onions and mix with the dressing. Now leave everything in the fridge for 1-2 hours.

Due to the spicy mustard used, there was a slight hint of horseradish, which tastes very good to me, but is also a bit dominant in the taste. So maybe just use Dijon mustard.

I served it with boiled eggs and homemade rye bread, everyone really loved it.
 

coxhaus

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I needed something to go with my grilled chicken thighs today. This gave me ideas and I went with it. Thanks.
 

Honerabi

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Went down the rabbit hole of Bavarian sweet mustard. Amazing stuff, especially made from scratch. Love the dark and yellow mustard seeds, and the piloncillo. The horseradish part just seems to need to be freshly grated. Great with Montreal pastrami (Nectar of Judea!), and dark rye.
 

Michi

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Went down the rabbit hole of Bavarian sweet mustard. Amazing stuff, especially made from scratch. Love the dark and yellow mustard seeds, and the piloncillo. The horseradish part just seems to need to be freshly grated. Great with Montreal pastrami (Nectar of Judea!), and dark rye.
That's interesting! As far as I know, horseradish isn't normally part of Weißwurstsenf. Do you have a recipe? I'm curious now! :)
 

coxhaus

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I was going to use smoky paprika instead of BBQ sauce but I was out so I used regular paprika. I used only 1 onion cut up in quarter rings which I soaked in apple cider vinegar to take a little edge off the onions. I also used a little less sugar. I do like the Dijon mustard in it.

I did not have enough time to salt wilt it. I was under gun for time.
 
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KingShapton

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I was going to use smoky paprika instead of BBQ sauce but I was out so I used regular paprika. I used only 1 onion cut up in quarter rings which I soaked in apple cider vinegar to take a little edge off the onions. I also used a little less sugar. I do like the Dijon mustard in it.

I did not have enough time to salt wilt it. I was under gun for time.
I was on the scale today and I didn't like the result!

So I will try a variant of the recipe without sugar in the next few days. Possibly also without mayonnaise...I hope that the great taste remains. I guess I'll have to experiment a bit until I'm satisfied.
 

Honerabi

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That's interesting! As far as I know, horseradish isn't normally part of Weißwurstsenf. Do you have a recipe? I'm curious now! :)
I started down the mustard and horseradish path with coleslaws I made for Super Bowl parties. Then I discovered the Bavarian sweet mustards;
I liked the horseradish part, but do not mix it with the sweet mustard. Still working on how to best crush the dried yellow and brown mustard seeds. They scratch the inside of my polycarbonate bowls on the food processors. A big mortar and pestle sort of works, but am still trying to get the right consistency. Heard that using a coffee or pepper mill works.
 

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Michi

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Thanks for the recipe! I made some Weißwurstsenf recently, which turned out decent, but not as good as the benchmark, which is Händlmaier.

Your recipe is more complex, with more spices added, so I'll give that a shot soon!
 

M1k3

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I started down the mustard and horseradish path with coleslaws I made for Super Bowl parties. Then I discovered the Bavarian sweet mustards;
I liked the horseradish part, but do not mix it with the sweet mustard. Still working on how to best crush the dried yellow and brown mustard seeds. They scratch the inside of my polycarbonate bowls on the food processors. A big mortar and pestle sort of works, but am still trying to get the right consistency. Heard that using a coffee or pepper mill works.
Smash/squish them. Put them in a plastic zip lock bag and use a mallet or pan and hit them. Or something hard and flat (like the bottom of a pan) and squish them.
 

coxhaus

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Thanks for the recipe! I made some Weißwurstsenf recently, which turned out decent, but not as good as the benchmark, which is Händlmaier.

Your recipe is more complex, with more spices added, so I'll give that a shot soon!
So, what do you put this on?
 

Michi

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So, what do you put this on?

The traditional use for it is with Leberkäse and with Weißwurst. In Bavaria, this mustard is known as "Weißwurstsenf", as well as "Süßer Senf" (sweet mustard).

You'll often find it as part of bread rolls with simple cold cuts in them. Not the salami kind, but the mild cooked sausages (think Bologna). The mustard works well in a buttered bread roll with with a few slices of sausage.

For more strongly spiced sausages, such as Bratwurst or Polish Kielbasa, people normally use a medium-hot or hot unseeded yellow mustard instead.

But, of course, there is no-one to stop you from putting it on whatever you like! :)
 

Honerabi

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So, what do you put this on?
Found and 8 oz jar of the Handlmaier at the World Market. I tried it, and I much prefer my first attempt, even with the uncrushed mustard seeds. Tthe Handlmaier uses glucose syrup and sugar beet molasses. IMHO these fall short of the piloncillo in terms of flavor. My home made seems to have much more depth and complexity of flavor.
I discovered Augies Montreal pastrami and a local dark rye. I like to toast the rye, slather on the sweet mustard, then top with some heated aged French cheese and the pastrami. Some sliced tomato really tops it off.
Bavarian food is a novelty for me.
 

Honerabi

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Smash/squish them. Put them in a plastic zip lock bag and use a mallet or pan and hit them. Or something hard and flat (like the bottom of a pan) and squish them.
Thanks for the simple solution. I have always seemed to make the problem at hand more complicated and difficult than it really is. Can't wait to make my next batch to see the affect on the flavor by crushing the mustard seeds.
 
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