[Cutting Boards] End vs. Edge

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by eighteesix, Jan 9, 2014.

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  1. Jan 9, 2014 #1

    eighteesix

    eighteesix

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    I've read some of the end grain discussions here. Let's have a comparison discussion.

    I just purchased my first large solid maple cutting board. It's an edge grain board. Beautiful and of the highest quality. I've since began to wonder if a board with end grain construction will help save my knife's edge, and to what degree of difference it will truly make.

    My theory is this: A high quality edge grain board will outperform any lower quality end grain board. Is the upgrade worth it? End grain construction is decisively more expensive.

    Anyone with experience with both?
     
  2. Jan 9, 2014 #2

    Crothcipt

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    I have used many types of boards I love my BoardSmith. He also explains about the difference between the two. here
    http://theboardsmith.com/boardsmith-faqs/

    I think your theory is a little off. The differences in high quality and low will have something to do with the glue that is used, and weather or not the wood has checks in it. Not counting the time difference between the labor.
     
  3. Jan 9, 2014 #3

    dannynyc

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    Boardsmith is the gold standard. A lot of people on the forum have these boards, myself included. Excellent craftsmanship and durability, and always end grain.
     
  4. Jan 9, 2014 #4

    brainsausage

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    I have two Boardsmith, an 18x24 maple, and 16x22 walnut. Besides the benefit to your edge life they feel like nothing else when cutting. Firm, yet forgiving. No slippiness like a poly board, and no sticking like a sani-tuff. Oh- and they're fecking beautiful.
     
  5. Jan 9, 2014 #5
    My experience disproves your theory, unless you are talking about end-grain bamboo.
     
  6. Jan 9, 2014 #6

    eighteesix

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    Well I suppose that's a good thing? Ha.

    Boardsmith does great work, I love everything over there. But the price is likely out of my budget. May have to look at Michigan Maple end grain.
     
  7. Jan 9, 2014 #7

    dannynyc

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    Not knowing anything one way or the other about Michigan Maple, I will say I've had lots of cutting boards come apart or damage my knives. It's worth saving up for a Boardsmith, which will last you a lifetime if you take proper care of it.
     
  8. Jan 9, 2014 #8

    brainsausage

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    ^What he said.
     
  9. Jan 9, 2014 #9
    A BoardSMITH board will last you the rest of your life. My suggestion is to save up to get one, rather than settle for second-best. Your new edge-grain board will serve until you can buy a BoardSMITH. Your knives are not going to "chip and shatter", you just will have to strop and sharpen a little more often.
     
  10. Jan 9, 2014 #10

    Salty dog

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    I have an end grain Boardsmith at home. I work on 65 y.o. edge grain at work. As much as I love my boardsmith I much prefer cutting at work.
     
  11. Jan 9, 2014 #11

    eighteesix

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    Please expand on your experience--why? When I'm about to spend $250, your opinion is incredibly important. :lol2:
     
  12. Jan 9, 2014 #12

    Crothcipt

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    Lol I would say just the size of that table would be more than enough.
     
  13. Jan 9, 2014 #13

    NO ChoP!

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    Yah, Salty's table is about a full acre of wood....

    His kitchen also has a window with natural light...something I envy!
     
  14. Jan 9, 2014 #14

    Mucho Bocho

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    mr Salty Usually keeps a cigarette butt burning in the corner of his board too, guess that for atmosphere. Salty's could keep an aged turd on his board and we'd all still think he rules.
     
  15. Jan 9, 2014 #15

    eighteesix

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    hah im getting a better idea now. still trying to justify spending an additional $200 on a board now. hehe
     
  16. Jan 9, 2014 #16

    Talim

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    My only regret with buying a Boardsmith is that I didn't buy one large enough. If I win the lottery I'd have every counter top be a Boardsmith. So I guess what I'm saying is that it's totally worth the extra money to get a Boardsmith.
     
  17. Jan 9, 2014 #17

    Asteger

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    My boardsmith board is a looker, I'll give you that, but my it is thirsty. I don't know about the rest of you, but I'll clean it when finished every with light, natural soap, and gently too, and the rest of the time just wipe with a damp cloth, but still seems I need an awful lot of board butter and mineral oil. Seems to dry out quickly. Therefore, I tend to use an edge grain or Japanese Hasegawa board 90% of the time.
     
  18. Jan 9, 2014 #18

    Crothcipt

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    If its about money then there is no justifying higher/ lower. If you never have tried a hamburger graded prime there is no justification over a mcdonalds burger. Other than someone saying its very much better. The 200$ is worth the cost and time you take sharpen your knives. The amount and type of glue is also a priority. Bad glue you need more for a hold.
     
  19. Jan 9, 2014 #19

    99Limited

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    My black cherry board was like that when new. I just went through the effort to apply straight mineral oil until the board slowed its absorbent rate. I guess I spent a couple of weeks and 250ml of mineral oil. After that I switched to board butter and applied it every night for a few days. Now I apply board butter once a month or so.

    As far as the OP's question. I have a Boos edge grain that works just fine. I know this board, even if I used it everyday, would last me a lifetime. Whether or not I had to sharpen my knives more often when I was using the Boos board, I don't remember.
     
  20. Jan 10, 2014 #20

    eighteesix

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  21. Jan 10, 2014 #21

    seattle_lee

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    Did you see the note on the Boardsmith website that mentioned his seconds at 25% off? You might see what he's got.
     
  22. Jan 10, 2014 #22

    brainsausage

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    Edge grain tend to warp and gouge more in my experience, but YMMV...
     
  23. Jan 10, 2014 #23

    bahamaroot

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    I have an 11x14x1.5 edge grain that has served me well for over 20yrs. My wife even ran it through the dishwasher a few times before I broke her of that. When I decided I wanted a new and bigger board I got an 18x24x2 BoardSmith. Love that board and it's my main but I still have and use my edge grain. They'll probably both last my lifetime.
     
  24. Jan 10, 2014 #24

    Salty dog

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    Chances are you won't notice the difference. Go for looks.

    FWIW, I find the maple edge grain softer. I don't baby my knives and have been known to "pound" them. The softer wood works better for my style and is more forgiving on my knives.

    No turds but I do have have a dozen or so cigarette burns on the edge of my work board/table.
    Also the work board has no glue. It's held together with metal rods. Something that can't be done with end grain.
     
  25. Jan 10, 2014 #25

    toek

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    Can you post some pictures of that Salty? :detective:
     
  26. Jan 10, 2014 #26

    Salty dog

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    You can see one of the round plugs on the edge in this picture.

    [​IMG]
     
  27. Jan 10, 2014 #27

    zitangy

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    I have tried Snow River and also John Boos ~edge and End grain.

    1. End grain.. Just like hairs sticking upwards adn you are cutting into it and thus shld be gentle on te thin fine edge adn theoretically, if it is not too deep, Shld "heal". Will be more thirsty though adn thus after sufficient oiling, I use Howards food safe wax most of the time to " seal it"

    As it is glued, both have come apart one or two parts ... nothing major. After light sanding adn squeezing liquid glue, clamp it, sand it as evenly as i can get it, oil it and its good to go. I suppose any glue will eventually come off.

    2. End grain. Problem of warpage. IF you can choose, look for the pieces that has ring lines pointing 65 to 90 degrees ( at the side of board)as these tend to have less tangential movt of the wood and thus more stable.

    Dry them well and oil them form time to time.. it will serve you well over many many years..

    IF you ask me whether I can feel the difference when cutting on them respectively ( maple edge and end grain) , I really cant tell teh diff. a I am not that ultra sensitive when I cut. But on Poly boards.. no thoroughly Joy at all.

    Whatever it is have fun with it and its meant to be used....

    rgds
    d
     
  28. Jan 10, 2014 #28

    Notaskinnychef

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    While I didn't have the budget for the awesome boards by boardsmith, I have a 20x20x3 end grain catskill board, been using it for a year now, and still has yet to show a knife cut on the board. Its awesome, love it and it will last me many decades, if not my lifetime
     
  29. Jan 10, 2014 #29

    icanhaschzbrgr

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    You can try MTMWood board. I own one and couldn't be more happy. Pretty affordable http://mtmwood.com/index.php?route=common/home
     
  30. Jan 10, 2014 #30

    franzb69

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    want that hattori kd salty =D
     

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