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What is causing this. The other half the knife looks perfect, this part looks like this. Is it a pressure thing? Should I work it out on a coarser stone
 

psfred

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Looks to me like an uneven grind with power tools. Unless you are picky about perfect looks in your knives (I am most definitely NOT picky about how my knives look) and the edge is sharp, it will smooth out with sharpening over time.

If the edge is not sharp, you will have to grind off a ton of steel, so a coarse stone is needed to start with.

Yanagibas are difficult to sharpen if you are used to Western knives, but not really rocket science. Never grind on the flat side with coarse stones, ever. Rarely need to remove material there, all the sharpening takes place on the bevel side. Sharpening and grinding to fix problems is SLOOOOW because of all the steel you have to remove, all the way up the wide bevel, and it won't happen fast. Which is why I'd not try to remove those "dimples" if the edge is ground well. Eventually normal sharpening will remove them.

At least you don't have a big fat "microbevel" like mine had that I'm just now getting rid of.
 

adam92

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Good to see lefty here.

Most of the new knife have the problem like this, Especially if you brought the cheap single bevel knives, the problem will be bigger.

Blade smith grind the knife on the big water wheel, & most of the time just slightly sharpen micro bevel after making kasumi. Not much Sharperner doing hand sharpening on whetstone all the time because of time consuming. Don’t need to worry about it, you will even the bevel eventually.

Sooner or later, you’ll need to start to coarse stone anyway, if the new knife doesn’t meet your sharpness level, you can start on coarse stone to set the crisp bevel, I found that much faster than medium stone.

I recommend just leave it as it is, unless you’re aesthetic guy, If you want to even the any low spot & high spot on the knife, you’ll need to start on the coarse stone, I think that waste too many steel.

Mostly lefty single bevel knives only have tiny low spot/ high spot.
 

Forty Ounce

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Low spots. Every knife will have them, unless they've been meticulously worked on stones. This is NOT a defect. Even multi thousand dollar knives will have them. My advice would be to not chase them and continue to sharpen and thin as normal, they will come out over time.
 
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