PSA - Oxalic Acid Rocks!!!

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I bought a bag of oxalic acid powder a while ago because of a discussion on here, but never got around to using it. Well, I found the teeniest spot of rust on my new catcheside within 5 minutes of pulling it out of the package. Rather than risk messing up the finish, I opted to try out the oxalic acid. A little bit of powder, a little warm water in a dish with a q tip… I’ve never seen rust come off easier. Granted this is a small spot, but it’s also in a slight indent in the metal, which would make it a little more difficult to remove completely. Took all of 5 seconds to remove.

Long story short, this stuff is the bomb for rust.
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Oxalic acid is the active ingredient in Bar Keepers Friend, which I know from experience will make mess of a blade. Make sure you neutralize and/or rinse really really well.
Curious. How has it messed up your blades? What were they and what were the effects? Thanks.
:)
 
1). You definitely want to use ammonia/windex or a solution of baking soda to nuetralize the oxalic acid.

2). BKF seems to have an abrasive in it as well as the acid.
 
Curious. How has it messed up your blades? What were they and what were the effects? Thanks.
:)

It's been 5+ years so my memory is a bit hazy about this, but I had a ZKramer carbon that got used I wanted to remove the forced patina. I put BKF on the blade, scrubbed, the blade looked clean and then I rinsed. Very quickly afterwards, the blade turned and ugly brown. It took a lot of rinsing (and I think baking soda) to try and stop the reaction.

I do not recall how much BKF o put on the blade initially, I really just remember it was a disproportionate amount of work to stop it reacting with the knife.
 
It's been 5+ years so my memory is a bit hazy about this, but I had a ZKramer carbon that got used I wanted to remove the forced patina. I put BKF on the blade, scrubbed, the blade looked clean and then I rinsed. Very quickly afterwards, the blade turned and ugly brown. It took a lot of rinsing (and I think baking soda) to try and stop the reaction.

I do not recall how much BKF o put on the blade initially, I really just remember it was a disproportionate amount of work to stop it reacting with the knife.
I don’t think I have used BKF on knives, I use it to clean my stainless steel cookware. There is a grit left behind, I have to wash a second time with soap/water and a sponge on cookware.

Once you use baking soda, that will neutralize any acid.
 
It's been 5+ years so my memory is a bit hazy about this, but I had a ZKramer carbon that got used I wanted to remove the forced patina. I put BKF on the blade, scrubbed, the blade looked clean and then I rinsed. Very quickly afterwards, the blade turned and ugly brown. It took a lot of rinsing (and I think baking soda) to try and stop the reaction.

I do not recall how much BKF o put on the blade initially, I really just remember it was a disproportionate amount of work to stop it reacting with the knife.
Thanks for the insights!
 
I used BKF many times to clean the baldes. Quick clean with soapy water or baking soda slurry will work great to remove BKF. But I also had success with just plain water.

I am not aware of better alternative to BKF i.e. cheap, accessible, easy to use and can be used for other purposes.
 
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