Sharpening a Kabar US Navy/Marine Utility Knife, Mark 2.

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I have had my Kabar for many years. It is made from 1095CV and has a HRC of about 58. I have never been able to get the edge on it I wanted. With the Shapton I know I can finally get that done. I have one question. I have a GS500, should I start the Kabar out with a #320?
 
I decided go with what I had so I used the GS500 to set the 20º angle, went to the #1000, and finished with the #2000. Now the Kabar has a printer paper cutting edge. My experience with Norton silicon carbide oil stones did not completely pass to Japanese whetstones. I was looking at the one I still have and I think it is 180/320. When I got the King Whetstones I got 6,000 and 8,000. It isn't until this thread and finally YouTube I learned my mistake.
 
I decided go with what I had so I used the GS500 to set the 20º angle, went to the #1000, and finished with the #2000. Now the Kabar has a printer paper cutting edge. My experience with Norton silicon carbide oil stones did not completely pass to Japanese whetstones. I was looking at the one I still have and I think it is 180/320. When I got the King Whetstones I got 6,000 and 8,000. It isn't until this thread and finally YouTube I learned my mistake.
You can cut printer paper with an edge made on kitchen floor tile. Please don't let that be your be your benchmark!
 
Unless the edge is REALLY gone, a GS500 should sharpen a Kabar just fine. I would then give it a few licks on a natural stone like a BBW, Idwall, ect for a bit of extra sharpmess.

My favourite stone to use on old military knives is a Turkey. They work really well for that.
 
No I know. It must be sturdy.

But don't expect a hanging hair kinda sharp knife, especially with these kind of thick blades to support heavy abuse.
Yes! What was really a moment of illumination was listening to Ethan Becker while talked about the BK62. He briefly discussed blade profiles. It isn't just the blade edge angle but the overall blade design. slicing edge and a cold chisel edge. This simple observation at last consolidated all I know about the Navy/Marine M3. It is ground with a 20º, 40º inclusive edge. The thickness of the blade makes this edge grind into the cold chisel profile. This really put what Pacific Island campaign Marines told me. Cutting pilots out of crashed aircraft with their M3's working like can openers.
 
Yes! What was really a moment of illumination was listening to Ethan Becker while talked about the BK62. He briefly discussed blade profiles. It isn't just the blade edge angle but the overall blade design. slicing edge and a cold chisel edge. This simple observation at last consolidated all I know about the Navy/Marine M3. It is ground with a 20º, 40º inclusive edge. The thickness of the blade makes this edge grind into the cold chisel profile. This really put what Pacific Island campaign Marines told me. Cutting pilots out of crashed aircraft with their M3's working like can openers.
When one depends on their tools to potentially save lives vs prepare dinner. Kinda changes the priorities.
 
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