flatenning stones with the atoma 140

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r0bz

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I have 3 questions about flattening stones with the atoma 140

1. is it legitimate to flatten 120 grit water stone with the atoma 140 or you do not recommend that very bad for the atoma 140?
2. is it legitimate to flatten 240 grit water stone with the atoma 140 or you do not recommend that because it will be very bad for the atoma 140 ?

flattening 800 grit water stone with atoma 140 is okay from what I understand?
 
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Probably depends on the waterstone. I've used the same cheap 140 diamond plate to flatten all sorts of stones down to 150 for the better part of 8 years and it still works fine. On the other hand, there are some low grit stones that need to be flattened / conditioned on loose abrasive as they don't work well if hit with a diamond plate. Looking at you Norton India Course.

As to higher grit stones, I use the 140 to flatten all my finishers but also use various stones and plates to condition the surface after. The small blue DMT 320 grit plate is a good general purpose conditioner / slurry stone for finishers.
 

Benuser

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Screenshot_20220309-201212_Amazon Shopping.jpg


This is what I use with my coarsest Shaptons, both for flattening as to counter glazing. Well worth to spare the Atoma. I'm now realising they hold quite well.
 

Kiru

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I have 3 questions about flattening stones with the atoma 140

1. is it legitimate to flatten 120 grit water stone with the atoma 140 or you do not recommend that very bad for the atoma 140?
2. is it legitimate to flatten 240 grit water stone with the atoma 140 or you do not recommend that because it will be very bad for the atoma 140 ?

flattening 800 grit water stone with atoma 140 is okay from what I understand?
SiC powder plus glass all the way!

If you just want to address the glazing on the stone, try put some SiC powder on it and rub with synthetic nagura.
 

r0bz

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will a low grit waterproof sandpaper work flattening the 120 grit water stone or it is a waste of time?
 

inferno

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I have 3 questions about flattening stones with the atoma 140

1. is it legitimate to flatten 120 grit water stone with the atoma 140 or you do not recommend that very bad for the atoma 140?
2. is it legitimate to flatten 240 grit water stone with the atoma 140 or you do not recommend that because it will be very bad for the atoma 140 ?

flattening 800 grit water stone with atoma 140 is okay from what I understand?

1 if it says shapton on it its bad!

2 if its says sigma on it its bad!

to be honest. you will wear out that atoma very very quickly if you flatten coarse stones.
i would use it from 1k and up.
 

inferno

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will a low grit waterproof sandpaper work flattening the 120 grit water stone or it is a waste of time?

it will work. i'd use it dry. regular **** paper wont last very long. cubitron will last for a while.

best option is SiC powder. 60-80 grit or so. its at least 10 times faster than paper. use wet.

i dont use any of it anymore with my coarse stones though. i just sharpen where the stone is higher, spreading the wear. i mean most coarse stones wear like butter. so just spread that wear and the stone will flatten itself. and a coarse stone imo dont have to be 100% flat to work.

when its starts to dish just use the edges until its flat-ish again.
 

r0bz

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r0bz

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Proceed with a light touch and streaming water. I don't use the Atoma 140 with a 220.
I don't have a sink bridge can I water with a bottle once every 1 minute 30 seconds or so? like I normally do as I sharpen on a table
i
 

r0bz

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I have the Atoma and the stone in my hands under the tap.
okay thanks !!!
what is the reason running water constantly is required out of curiosity?
instead of applying water every while like whens sharpening
 

r0bz

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what is the reason to do it like this


instead of like this?
 
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Seems people are saying protect the Atoma, don't use too much pressure, don't use it on course stones.

I've legitimately been using a $30 cheap plate from CKTG for 8 years in a semi pro environment. Its been used a lot on Nubatama 150's, Shapton Kuromaku 220's and a ton of higher grit stones and seriously, it still works fine. I never baby it, I put as much pressure as I can on it, go as fast as I can. The only thing I don't do is put steel on it.

So I know this sounds like a poke at atoma, and I am not suggesting buying the CKTG plate, it might be rubbish now, I got mine 8 years ago, but if atomas don't last long, what makes them worth the extra money?
 

psfred

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I use 60 grit SiC either on something hard like the sidewalk or that chunk of sandstone I'm flattening. I have a coarse grit diamond lapidary plate, but the diamonds are spread out pretty far and it doesn't work well.

Most coarse grit waterstones are soft enough you don't have to worry too much about fracturing the diamonds on the Atoma, but that is not universally true -- King Deluxe 300, Shapton Glass, and probably a few others of very hard composition will both wear the plate badly or burnish the stone, neither of which you want.

My King Deluxe 300 needs "refreshing" fairly often when I'm grinding off lots of hard steel (like the yanagiba I screwed up) or it starts to act like a 1k grit stone. A few seconds with some grit and the sandstone chunk and it's good to go. Sandstone is almost flat now too, going to use it on razors I think.
 

nexus1935

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I use 60 grit SiC either on something hard like the sidewalk or that chunk of sandstone I'm flattening. I have a coarse grit diamond lapidary plate, but the diamonds are spread out pretty far and it doesn't work well.

Most coarse grit waterstones are soft enough you don't have to worry too much about fracturing the diamonds on the Atoma, but that is not universally true -- King Deluxe 300, Shapton Glass, and probably a few others of very hard composition will both wear the plate badly or burnish the stone, neither of which you want.

My King Deluxe 300 needs "refreshing" fairly often when I'm grinding off lots of hard steel (like the yanagiba I screwed up) or it starts to act like a 1k grit stone. A few seconds with some grit and the sandstone chunk and it's good to go. Sandstone is almost flat now too, going to use it on razors I think.
Thanks for the commentary on the King Deluxe 300. I have one that's starting to dish and haven't flattened it before.

Have you tried something like this before? Wondering if that 60 grit would be effective for the KD300 - not as messy as SiC powder and cheaper than an Atoma.

 

psfred

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Yup. Don't bother, you will end up with a very hard, very slick, 2K stone.

The point of using loose grit (and light pressure) is that the rolling grit dislodges grit from that hard stone leaving nice sharp edged particles. Silicon carbide particles fracture under pressue, so using a solid stone for the job grinds down the grit in the King leaving a smooth surface.

Took me a long time to figure out why my King was so good when I got it and then only polished after I flattened it. Very similar to Arkansas stones, where the grit is all about the same size, the difference between soft and hard and how they cut is how polished the grit is and how densely packed it is.
 
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