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I use CA glue for all my stone repairs, I think there's a lot larger risk of uneven material removal and/or scratching if you use epoxy for joints that intersect the sharpening surface(s).
Yeah I think that would have been my first choice but because there were actual parts missing and voids that needed filling I didn’t think it would be strong enough…
 
The joys of taking delivery of stones in Arizona summer.
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Edit: Sorry, wrong thread. That's no JNat, is it?
 
Unfortunately looks like I'm becoming a bit of a rock addict.

This one is really cool, a beautiful karasu, unknown mine and strata, but reasonably soft, like a 3.5+. Got a good deal on it. Someone with more knowledge than me guessed shobu or nakayama

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Does the black skin sparkle in bright light/sun? That’s the only definitive sign of Nakayama according to Alex G. If it’s flat black, another possibility is maybe Ozaki.
 
Does the black skin sparkle in bright light/sun? That’s the only definitive sign of Nakayama according to Alex G. If it’s flat black, another possibility is maybe Ozaki.
I will check it out tomorrow, I did just put a coat of lacquer on it though, so might be harder to tell. That's cool to know, would love to know more facts that help with identifying stones. For example, suita is easy because I hear only they have renge (correct me if I am wrong)
 
@KenjiF Guilty as charged. A little crazy for where I am at in my polishing journey but when I saw some of the finish pics Ed posted... phew. I have to say my first impressions on kiri / kanna are that it is quite a bit more intuitive to use and faster than a Nak. Koppa I have. I think it is a touch softer as well. Hope to test it on a larger surface sometime soon. Bought a few stones lately that um... yeah... lifetime investments ;). I think this one is probably the standout performer though. Really stoked to have it.
 
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@KenjiF Guilty as charged. A little crazy for where I am at in my polishing journey but when I saw some of the finish pics Ed posted... phew. I have to say my first impressions on kiri / kanna are that it is quite a bit more intuitive to use and faster than a Nak. Koppa I have. I think it is a touch softer as well. Hope to test it on a larger surface sometime soon. Bought a few stones lately that um... yeah... lifetime investments ;). I think this one is probably the standout performer though. Really stoked to have it.
Yeah, I saw the finish and went hunting for it as well... prob good you got there first. I went a bit stone crazy lately as well. Let's just hope my daughters like polishing knives one day... Post some more pics when after you get it on a knife bevel!
 
Pretty much immediately regretted selling that one and so hunted down another. Hoping to get a few more of that type in this late august through end of september. Hopefully in more reasonable sizes too so they aren’t as expensive.
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I didn't even realize they were maruka stones... You mentioned that it was a specific layer of tomae but I didn't even realize there were multiple. I'm very interested in those stones when they do come in...
 
@KenjiF Guilty as charged. A little crazy for where I am at in my polishing journey but when I saw some of the finish pics Ed posted... phew. I have to say my first impressions on kiri / kanna are that it is quite a bit more intuitive to use and faster than a Nak. Koppa I have. I think it is a touch softer as well. Hope to test it on a larger surface sometime soon. Bought a few stones lately that um... yeah... lifetime investments ;). I think this one is probably the standout performer though. Really stoked to have it.

my position has been for a while now that if you can afford it, the really high end stuff is the best place to start.

in a lot of hobbies the high end stuff is either usually better in subtle ways, or requires you to have a lot of skill, or can be finicky but special.

for the most part, the stones that go for big money are usually really pure, and the right combinations of hardness/speed/fineness such that they are simply easier to use. granted a Naka kiita is unlikely to ever be as easy to use as say, a Hakka, but let's be real here there are lots of cool hard finishers and amongst that group there are only a few that stand out as being (comparatively) easy to use.
 
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