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kitchen cart/butcher block, what oil to use for the cutting surface?

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jm2hill

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Picked this up today for a measly total of free from a neighbour who broke a piece of the drawer so he was just going to throw it out.

I re-drilled the piece and cleaned it and am very happy with result.

Got a knife block built in for quick access, paper towel holder for quick cleaning and a hook set for quick attachements.

Wine rack and drawer for storage and I think its a pretty good steal.

On the top for veggies and fruits pull out board to put on top for meat and fish.

He says its made out of cherry wood. I say it looks more like birch, but oh well. Rubbed a knife against it for a while and it was pretty soft.

Now the question is, as I have never owned a real wooden board, will only be getting the one I want in september. What oil/wax should I use to keep it in shape?

here are some pictures:





IMG-20110717-00022.jpg


IMG-20110717-00024.jpg


IMG-20110717-00023.jpg
 

EdipisReks

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i saturate with mineral oil and then, after the surfaces aren't tacky anymore, i seal with a beeswax/mineral oil paste that i make.
 

Ratton

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What oil/wax should I use to keep it in shape?
You should use mineral oil as it will not go rancid like vegetable oil will! You can purchase it at any drug store or pharmacy.

You should oil all sides including the bottom, this will help prevent warping.

I was taught to oil something new as follows: once a day for a week, once a week for a month and then once a month forever, or when it is looking dried out.
You can also use the wax made from bees wax and mineral oil after it has a good oiling.

Good scoff!!!!:thumbsup2:


 

DWSmith

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I can't tell a lot from the photo but I can say for almost 100% certainty it isn't cherry. Looks more like a commercially made piece from rubber tree wood. If the long pieces that run the length are finger jointed, than it is rubber tree.

Back to your original question...Mineral oil when the area cut on most starts to look lighter than the surrounding wood. Clean the board, apply the oil and allow it to soak in then buff off. Once in a while oil the bottom as well. You can melt some bees wax or paraffin into some oil and apply to the board for some added water repellency. (Will not make the board water proof!)
 

jm2hill

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Thanks all for the advice!

I can't tell a lot from the photo but I can say for almost 100% certainty it isn't cherry. Looks more like a commercially made piece from rubber tree wood. If the long pieces that run the length are finger jointed, than it is rubber tree.
here's a HQ photo to look at. Maybe you can see now?

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Definitely didn't look like cherry to me. Seemed like birch. I had thought it may be the synthetic wood. But I have a cutting board made out of that stuff and it had a different feel. Also no finger locks (I don't think). Take a look and let me know if you can. Thanks!

and once again thanks for the advice
 

DWSmith

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Rubber Tree.
 

jm2hill

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Rubber Tree.
Thanks!

its good to have board expert on here.

This forum always surprised me with the amount of knowledge that it contains.

One day I would be really interested to learn where everyone learnt what they know and what got them started.

i.e to all you: knife makers. board makers, handle makers, Knife designers; where did you learn something like this.

And how the hell is my brain supposed to learn all of it too.
 

SpikeC

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You learn from here and there and everywhere. The key is to keep looking!
 

Jim

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Sometimes I look, but then I forget what it was I was looking for.
 

DWSmith

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And how the hell is my brain supposed to learn all of it too.
That is why there are people who specialize in specific things. Pick their brains. As an old employer said, "Be a meaningful specific rather than a wandering generality". I stick with boards because it is what I know and when I get off track, I get in trouble.

As for myself, I am a complete novice with the Japanese knives. I know they work well and feel good in my hand but I don't know a shig from a fig. I ask the experts here. Same goes for handles so I ask Stephan when I have a question. The best way to learn is to ask, ask and ask somemore. You WILL get answers!
 
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