Masahiro pro Vs Masamoto VG Vs ?

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HappyamateurDK

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Hi all.

I've come to the conclusion that I could use a 210 mm stainless gyuto with a western handle. Something not too delicate, but still a great cutter. I would prefer a good bit of knuckle clearence. Something that doesn't require the same attention and wiping that my carbons do.

Mac have too small handles for me. And I already have a tojiro in 240 and would like something else.

I've bin looking at a masahiro pro. And a masamoto VG. The masamoto is a good bit more expensive. But what would people in this great forum choose? Should I consider a 3'rd option?

Have a nice day 👍
 
You said you want something “not too delicate”. Do you want something like a Ryusen in R2/SG2 that has excellent edge retention but can be a little brittle or a tougher stainless like in the Masahiro/Masamoto that has less edge retention, but you can beat on it a little more?
 
You said you want something “not too delicate”. Do you want something like a Ryusen in R2/SG2 that has excellent edge retention but can be a little brittle or a tougher stainless like in the Masahiro/Masamoto that has less edge retention, but you can beat on it a little more?

Mostly the last. Something I can use without babying it too much
 
A shame..it does look like a nice knife.

I wonder..you alway have so much great knowledge. Do you know the masamoto VG ?
Haven't used it myself. Only know it's no longer VG-10.
I'm a carbon lover. When it has to be stainless, my best, limited experience are with the Misono 440 (boring but OK), the Sabatier 200 (a fantastic light-weight) and the spectacular Ryusen Blazen SG2. Didn't find it brittle at all, but it requires a good first stone sharpening — as most knives. Sharpening SG2 in general is not that simple, though. You will find very different reports, but in my own experience deburring SG2 is a bit tricky.
 
https://www.sugimoto-hamono.com/e/s...=1&ca2=1469391179-794720&ca=1469390509-470005
I’d recommend something like the Sugimoto CM stainless. I have the Chinese cleaver from this line. The steel is called “chromium molybdenum” and isn’t exactly disclosed, but it’s nicer than Masamoto VG or the Masahiro MBS-26 in my opinion. Easier to sharpen, takes a nicer edge and holds it well. From what I can tell, it’s thinner BTE, so should be a better cutter and as a bonus, it has nice deeply stamped kanji rather than something screened on.
 
https://www.sugimoto-hamono.com/e/s...=1&ca2=1469391179-794720&ca=1469390509-470005
I’d recommend something like the Sugimoto CM stainless. I have the Chinese cleaver from this line. The steel is called “chromium molybdenum” and isn’t exactly disclosed, but it’s nicer than Masamoto VG or the Masahiro MBS-26 in my opinion. Easier to sharpen, takes a nicer edge and holds it well. From what I can tell, it’s thinner BTE, so should be a better cutter and as a bonus, it has nice deeply stamped kanji rather than something screened on.

That does look really nice. But I can't find it anywhere near where I live( Denmark )
 
Haven't used it myself. Only know it's no longer VG-10.
I'm a carbon lover. When it has to be stainless, my best, limited experience are with the Misono 440 (boring but OK), the Sabatier 200 (a fantastic light-weight) and the spectacular Ryusen Blazen SG2. Didn't find it brittle at all, but it requires a good first stone sharpening — as most knives. Sharpening SG2 in general is not that simple, though. You will find very different reports, but in my own experience deburring SG2 is a bit tricky.

Thanks.

I actually looked at the ksab 200 series. It really tickles me. But it only comes in 180 mm and 250 mm. That means too small or too large.
 
what do people Think about the misono UX10 ? Could that be a choice ?
The steel — Sandviks 19C27 — has been developed for industrial purposes. Large, very regularly distributed carbides. Delivers a lot of bite, even when perfectly dull. That's why a lot of cooks who don't sharpen themselves like them. It's a particular notion of sharpness.
I do like the innovative design. Sharpening them is frankly unpleasant.
 
The steel — Sandviks 19C27 — has been developed for industrial purposes. Large, very regularly distributed carbides. Delivers a lot of bite, even when perfectly dull. That's why a lot of cooks who don't sharpen themselves like them. It's a particular notion of sharpness.
I do like the innovative design. Sharpening them is frankly unpleasant.
Aaaaaaaaand, they’re said to need some thinning.
 
The steel — Sandviks 19C27 — has been developed for industrial purposes. Large, very regularly distributed carbides. Delivers a lot of bite, even when perfectly dull. That's why a lot of cooks who don't sharpen themselves like them. It's a particular notion of sharpness.
I do like the innovative design. Sharpening them is frankly unpleasant.

Would you say it good be a good everyday workhorse ? It seems it has a pretty nice classic French profile..is that right?
 
what do people Think about the misono UX10 ? Could that be a choice ?
I’ve sharpened and fixed a few of them up for people before. Popular, but a bit overpriced in my opinion. I really like the profile on them, flows very nicely into the heel so you don’t get accordion cuts often. Also like the look of the angled bolster. The grind is so-so, overly conveyed at the edge, but kind of flat on the blade face. You can thin and convex them with relatively little effort and then they cut a lot better. Steel is tough, pretty easy to sharpen. My main complaint is some of them have ok fit and finish and some have the flattest, sharpest spine and choil I’ve ever encountered, sometimes worse than the cheaper Misono Molybdenum and 440 lines which are at least usually eased at the spine and choil. Maybe make sure to check with the retailer about the spine and choil if you aren’t buying in person. Otherwise be ready to go at it with some sandpaper.
 
Would you say it good be a good everyday workhorse ? It seems it has a pretty nice classic French profile..is that right?
Sure, but because of the unpleasant sharpening — to me a very important criterion — I would rather opt for the Misono 440, besides the huge price difference. The UX-10 240 costs $268 excl. shipping, VAT, import duties, handling costs. You can do so much better.
 
the ux10 in 240 definitely has a big handle, especially compared to 210s

mine definitely needed some work on the choil and spine but it was like 10 minutes of work. i also don't know if i'd call the sharpening "unpleasant" imo it's just different, especially compared to a good carbon knife. You can really tell going from something like shirogami to the UX10 back to back but if you're just working on the UX10 along with other stainless knives it's largely just another knife.
 
Amongst the stainless, UX-10 is a peculiar case, and this has all to do with the origin of the steel, developed for industrial purposes. Obviously abrasion resistance has been prioritised, which is IMHO not the most interesting property with a knife steel.
 
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