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Max temperature for induction glass top?

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Boynutman

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So, I have a Smeg induction range. I also have a cast iron grill plate. These things need to get hot for proper grilling, and there's plenty of power in the induction range, it just loves cast iron.
But... What concerns me a bit is how hot these cast iron plates may become and hence, the glass plate. Is it safe to turn it up to max, or will the glass crack, or...?
Couldn't find anything on the web. Any thoughts/experience?
Thanks!
 

GorillaGrunt

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Haven’t used a plate like that; I use induction at work and at home and have seen someone leave a pan with some oil on a burner until the oil ignited from the heat without flame nor spark, as well as left a cast iron skillet on and forgotten about it until I was sniffing around to find the weird smell. Neither of these incidents damaged the burner, but that’s about all I know. It sounds like you might want to let the plate cool on the burner to prevent the glass from cooling unevenly and cracking; also I think the Hatco and Vollrath burners I use have temperature safety switches that trip when a temperature that could damage the unit is reached.
 

Boynutman

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Thanks! That provides some reassurance. Letting it cool down in place sounds like a good idea.

I couldn't find anything on a temp sensor in my unit although that would make sense.

Much appreciated!
 

MarcelNL

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yeah, I have used the induction range to grill perfectly fine without the glass being damaged, and my GF took the test further by not switching off under an empty pan, I suspect it has a temp sensor for safety...
 

krx927

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Apparently there are some sensors that switch it off. I am not exactly sure if they are temperature based, but they are there.

I have another question:
I have just the opposite worry about my new (inherited) induction range: I am worried that it will destroy my pans and pots. I see the problem when using pans and pots that are larger than "heating" element of induction range. In some cases they are significantly bigger.
I heard about the cases when on classic vitroceramic (by this I mean the type that has classic hot heating element under glass) destroyed pans and the part that was directly above the heating element became convex.

Does anybody know what is the danger of this happening on induction range?
 

Boynutman

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My DeBuyer carbon steel frying pans permanently deformed, the bottom slightly bulged downward. Still usable though (I guess that is a personal consideration).
Otherwise I have not experienced any deformation (le Creuset cast irons, various decent quality stainless steel, various non sticks). I guess most pans are thick/strong enough to withstand temperature induced stresses.
 
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rmrf

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I have just the opposite worry about my new (inherited) induction range: I am worried that it will destroy my pans and pots. ... destroyed pans and the part that was directly above the heating element became convex.

Does anybody know what is the danger of this happening on induction range?
Yes, this can happen. I have first hand experience with warping a matfer bourgeat 12 in skillet and a 7 ply demeyere 12.6 in skillet. I'm not 100% it was the burner with the demeyere, it might have been de-glazing. Here is how to warp a pan:

1) Heat up a cold pan on max
2) add cold or even room temperature ingredients. Use a liquid (water) if you want to maximize the chance of warping.

The warping I encounter is that the pan becomes convex and do not sit flat on the stove top. This is particularly annoying on induction because heating here is highly dependent on distance from the source of magnetic field (1/r^3 if its a coil vs 1/r for conduction)

While it is probably true that a thicker pan is more resistant to deformation than a thinner pan, even a demeyere 7 ply and 3mm of carbon steel can easily be deformed.

I've never warped a cast iron pan. I bet it is because I don't cook on them as much compared to carbon steel or stainless clad rather than some inherent superiority of cast iron.

I have a few tips to prevent warping:
1) Preheat on medium (5 on my stove that goes up to 10). If you need high heat (stir fry), increase after the pan is already fairly hot.
2) Deglaze with a small (1/4 cup) at a time until the liquid stops evaporating immediately. Don't deglaze with liquid straight from the fridge.
3) DO NOT clean the pan immediately after you finish cooking. Wait for it to cool completely. I've never had a huge problem with cast iron or carbon steel when cleaning and bar keeper's friend will strip even the worst crud off stainless pans. I used to soak the pans in vinegar because I assumed the mild acid won't attack stainless much. This is true, except that a salty acid solution may cause pitting and we often cook with salt. So, I don't recommend that. If you really want to keep the finish on your stainless, maybe pre-wash to get rid of salt and then soak in vinegar.
 

Boynutman

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That is good feedback.

I tend to use pans that fit the size of the circles/burners on the stove top, so that may promote even heating. And I do preheat at 5 as @rmrf suggests as a precaution. And I seldom use full power in a dry pan (I do use max power when boiling water).
So perhaps I have protected my pans somewhat.
 

rmrf

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I do a lot of stir frying and searing of wet-ish meat because I'm too lazy to pat dry with paper towels. I also always use pans larger than my burner because I don't like cooking in batches. So, I'm probably very knowledgeable in how not to do things! :p
 

GorillaGrunt

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So that’s what happened to my 12” Mauviel steel skillet. Makes sense, I probably left it get too hot on induction and then threw food into it; I wondered if it was defective or if I put it in cold water hot even though I know not to do that.

not sure if this extra bit will help anyone but I looked for induction burners with coils larger than 7” and came up dry, even the top of the line pro stuff ... at 110v. I accidentally found myself with a Hatco 240v model and Jerry rigged it with a transformer to make it work. Turns out that one has a significantly bigger coil that fits my whole stockpot and all but the edges of a 12” pan. I don’t recommend anyone hack these things together without the correct electrical power supply but if you do have or get a 240v outlet, there are burners for large cookware available on the 240v side.
 

ModRQC

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Yes, this can happen. I have first hand experience with warping a matfer bourgeat 12 in skillet and a 7 ply demeyere 12.6 in skillet. I'm not 100% it was the burner with the demeyere, it might have been de-glazing. Here is how to warp a pan:

1) Heat up a cold pan on max
2) add cold or even room temperature ingredients. Use a liquid (water) if you want to maximize the chance of warping.

The warping I encounter is that the pan becomes convex and do not sit flat on the stove top. This is particularly annoying on induction because heating here is highly dependent on distance from the source of magnetic field (1/r^3 if its a coil vs 1/r for conduction)

While it is probably true that a thicker pan is more resistant to deformation than a thinner pan, even a demeyere 7 ply and 3mm of carbon steel can easily be deformed.

I've never warped a cast iron pan. I bet it is because I don't cook on them as much compared to carbon steel or stainless clad rather than some inherent superiority of cast iron.

I have a few tips to prevent warping:
1) Preheat on medium (5 on my stove that goes up to 10). If you need high heat (stir fry), increase after the pan is already fairly hot.
2) Deglaze with a small (1/4 cup) at a time until the liquid stops evaporating immediately. Don't deglaze with liquid straight from the fridge.
3) DO NOT clean the pan immediately after you finish cooking. Wait for it to cool completely. I've never had a huge problem with cast iron or carbon steel when cleaning and bar keeper's friend will strip even the worst crud off stainless pans. I used to soak the pans in vinegar because I assumed the mild acid won't attack stainless much. This is true, except that a salty acid solution may cause pitting and we often cook with salt. So, I don't recommend that. If you really want to keep the finish on your stainless, maybe pre-wash to get rid of salt and then soak in vinegar.
My my... even All-Clad 3-ply pans and non-stick aren't so frisky of a burner set on High and a bit of room-temperature liquid - or cold liquid for that matter. Cheaper pans, they don't support it so well though.

A stainless pan crud pretty much removes itself from rinsing with very hot water. Pan will come clean with adding a bit a vinegar to warm water and soap. Much easier when what was cooking was deglazed obviously, but not really difficult to maintain whatsoever.

All Cerans have sensors to control overheating - also that outside of the burner itself. So when cooking on radiant ceran with a pot bigger than the burner, not only it will be slow because of poor coverage, but also because once hot the stove might cycle down the burner every few.
 

ModRQC

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Aaaah yes, using improper burner size for pan (read smaller than pan) will effectively augment your chances of warping your stuff.
 
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