SOLD MSicard Cutlery 220mm X 110mm 52100 Cleaver Semi-Custom

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MSicardCutlery

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Hello All,

Here's a rare one. I mistakenly cut this knife for a hidden tang, when the customer wanted a full tang. As a result, I now have a spare cleaver to offer. As of yet uncut/unset neck length and so on. Buyer's choice of handle. Not much taper at the spine, the weight reflects that. It was designed as more of a LWH/WH.

As an additional note, after months of consideration I've decided to quit taking on cleaver orders indefinitely. I can't deny their utility, but I simply don't enjoy making them.

52100-cleaver-msicardcutlery-chef-knife (2).jpg

52100-cleaver-msicardcutlery-chef-knife.jpg




Blade: 222mmx110mm 52100 (65hrc) belt finish
Neck: 17mm wide
Handle: ???
POB: ???
Spine: tapering from 2.8mm-2.5mm from heel to end
Grind: flat to convex RH bias
Weight: 398g
Relieved choil and spine
Edge: .2mm@1mm measured at the midpoint,


Asking $470 U.S + handle + $25 shipping. As always, if this blade is purchased in conjunction with another I will happily deduct $25 off of the price of the other blade.

Also, if you'd like Julien to make the handle he's offering a 10% discount for people that come his way with my semi-customs

Thanks for looking!

-Matt
 

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As an additional note, after months of consideration I've decided to quit taking on cleaver orders indefinitely. I can't deny their utility, but I simply don't enjoy making them.

Bittersweet news! Would definitely have wanted to try an MSC cleaver one day, but I'm glad that you're setting appropriate boundaries to preserve your sanity and love for the craft. Guess I'll have to get a gyuto 😁
 
Thanks! Striking a balance isn't always easy

It's one of the hardest things. A lot of common experience and peer reviewed research establishes that intrinsic motivation takes a major hit when performance becomes predicated on external reward. In other words, the moment you start getting paid to do something, it becomes work. It's then up to the creator to set boundaries that allow them to continue accessing that place of love for the craft. Far be it from any of us in the customer base to take issue with those decisions. You gotta do what you gotta do, for sure.
 
It's one of the hardest things. A lot of common experience and peer reviewed research establishes that intrinsic motivation takes a major hit when performance becomes predicated on external reward. In other words, the moment you start getting paid to do something, it becomes work. It's then up to the creator to set boundaries that allow them to continue accessing that place of love for the craft. Far be it from any of us in the customer base to take issue with those decisions. You gotta do what you gotta do, for sure.
I don't suppose you might know where I might be able to find research papers on the subject? I'd be very interested to know just what the actual margins are and just how the metrics are established.
 
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I don't suppose you might know where I might be able to find research papers on the subject?

Sure thing. A nice summary is in Ch. 10.1 of Psychology 2e, a university level free-use psych textbook which you can read here. References to the cited studies are found later in the text. See excerpt below, I tried to emphasize the key points for easy review:

Why do we do the things we do? What motivations underlie our behaviors? Motivation describes the wants or needs that direct behavior toward a goal. In addition to biological motives, motivations can be intrinsic (arising from internal factors) or extrinsic (arising from external factors) (Figure 10.2). Intrinsically motivated behaviors are performed because of the sense of personal satisfaction that they bring, while extrinsically motivated behaviors are performed in order to receive something from others.
Think about why you are pursuing an education. Are you here because you enjoy learning and want to pursue an education to make yourself a more well-rounded individual? If so, then you are intrinsically motivated. However, if you are here because you want to get a college degree to make yourself more marketable for a high-paying career or to satisfy the demands of your parents, then your motivation is more extrinsic in nature.
In reality, our motivations are often a mix of both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, but the nature of the mix of these factors might change over time (often in ways that seem counter-intuitive). There is an old adage: “Choose a job that you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life,” meaning that if you enjoy your occupation, work doesn’t seem like . . . well, work. Some research suggests that this isn’t necessarily the case (Daniel & Esser, 1980; Deci, 1972; Deci, Koestner, & Ryan, 1999). According to this research, receiving some sort of extrinsic reinforcement (i.e., getting paid) for engaging in behaviors that we enjoy leads to those behaviors being thought of as work no longer providing that same enjoyment. As a result, we might spend less time engaging in these reclassified behaviors in the absence of any extrinsic reinforcement. For example, Odessa loves baking, so in her free time, she bakes for fun. Oftentimes, after stocking shelves at her grocery store job, she whips up pastries in the evenings because she enjoys baking. When a coworker in the store’s bakery department leaves his job, Odessa applies for his position and gets transferred to the bakery department. Although she enjoys what she does in her new job, after a few months, she no longer has much desire to concoct tasty treats in her free time. Baking has become work in a way that changes her motivation to do it (Figure 10.3). What Odessa has experienced is called the overjustification effect—intrinsic motivation is diminished when extrinsic motivation is given. This can lead to extinguishing the intrinsic motivation and creating a dependence on extrinsic rewards for continued performance (Deci et al., 1999).


^ So it looks like the key papers are:

1. Daniel & Esser, 1980;
2. Deci, 1972
3. Deci, Koestner, & Ryan, 1999.

I looked it up in the references section and the full citations for those studies are:

Daniel, T. L., & Esser, J. K. (1980). Intrinsic motivation as influenced by rewards, task interest, and task structure. Journal of Applied Psychology, 65, 566–573.

Deci, E. L. (1972). Intrinsic motivation, extrinsic reinforcement, and inequity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 22, 113–120.

Deci, E. L., Koestner, R., & Ryan, R. M. (1999). A meta-analytic review of experiments examining the effects of extrinsic rewards on intrinsic motivation. Psychological Bulletin, 125, 627–668.
 
Sure thing. A nice summary is in Ch. 10.1 of Psychology 2e, a university level free-use psych textbook which you can read here. References to the cited studies are found later in the text. See excerpt below, I tried to emphasize the key points for easy review:

Why do we do the things we do? What motivations underlie our behaviors? Motivation describes the wants or needs that direct behavior toward a goal. In addition to biological motives, motivations can be intrinsic (arising from internal factors) or extrinsic (arising from external factors) (Figure 10.2). Intrinsically motivated behaviors are performed because of the sense of personal satisfaction that they bring, while extrinsically motivated behaviors are performed in order to receive something from others.
Think about why you are pursuing an education. Are you here because you enjoy learning and want to pursue an education to make yourself a more well-rounded individual? If so, then you are intrinsically motivated. However, if you are here because you want to get a college degree to make yourself more marketable for a high-paying career or to satisfy the demands of your parents, then your motivation is more extrinsic in nature.
In reality, our motivations are often a mix of both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, but the nature of the mix of these factors might change over time (often in ways that seem counter-intuitive). There is an old adage: “Choose a job that you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life,” meaning that if you enjoy your occupation, work doesn’t seem like . . . well, work. Some research suggests that this isn’t necessarily the case (Daniel & Esser, 1980; Deci, 1972; Deci, Koestner, & Ryan, 1999). According to this research, receiving some sort of extrinsic reinforcement (i.e., getting paid) for engaging in behaviors that we enjoy leads to those behaviors being thought of as work no longer providing that same enjoyment. As a result, we might spend less time engaging in these reclassified behaviors in the absence of any extrinsic reinforcement. For example, Odessa loves baking, so in her free time, she bakes for fun. Oftentimes, after stocking shelves at her grocery store job, she whips up pastries in the evenings because she enjoys baking. When a coworker in the store’s bakery department leaves his job, Odessa applies for his position and gets transferred to the bakery department. Although she enjoys what she does in her new job, after a few months, she no longer has much desire to concoct tasty treats in her free time. Baking has become work in a way that changes her motivation to do it (Figure 10.3). What Odessa has experienced is called the overjustification effect—intrinsic motivation is diminished when extrinsic motivation is given. This can lead to extinguishing the intrinsic motivation and creating a dependence on extrinsic rewards for continued performance (Deci et al., 1999).


^ So it looks like the key papers are:

1. Daniel & Esser, 1980;
2. Deci, 1972
3. Deci, Koestner, & Ryan, 1999.

I looked it up in the references section and the full citations for those studies are:

Daniel, T. L., & Esser, J. K. (1980). Intrinsic motivation as influenced by rewards, task interest, and task structure. Journal of Applied Psychology, 65, 566–573.

Deci, E. L. (1972). Intrinsic motivation, extrinsic reinforcement, and inequity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 22, 113–120.

Deci, E. L., Koestner, R., & Ryan, R. M. (1999). A meta-analytic review of experiments examining the effects of extrinsic rewards on intrinsic motivation. Psychological Bulletin, 125, 627–668.
Thank you! It's definitely pertinent to my life.

Also, SOLD
 
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