Nagura Question

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I'm new to whetstone sharpening and am about to make my first stone purchase. I plan to buy Chosera 800, 3k and an Atoma 140.

My question is, do I need to buy a separate nagura to use with my Choseras? I know they come with one but have read they are not that great for raising a slurry, as they are better suited for cleaning. Do I need separate grit naguras or will one high grit nagura work fine? A few recommendations would be helpful.

Thanks in advance.
 
I have the NP 800 and 3000 and the Atoma 140 plate. The only drawback to not using a nagura after flattening with the atoma is it leaves the surface of the 800 and 3000 pretty scratchy (the scratches are visible and the stone feels a little rougher in use for the first few passes). I have the Naniwa 800 and 3000 nagura as well and mostly use them to smooth out the surface after flattening. I'll also use the 3000 to build a slurry when using that stone for polishing. I'd say, the Naniwa nagura are pretty cheap, especially if you throw them in the cart with the stones when you already have free shipping.

In the end, not necessary, but nice to have to keep the stones smooth after flattening and to refresh the surface as needed.
 
I have the NP 800 and 3000 and the Atoma 140 plate. The only drawback to not using a nagura after flattening with the atoma is it leaves the surface of the 800 and 3000 pretty scratchy (the scratches are visible and the stone feels a little rougher in use for the first few passes). I have the Naniwa 800 and 3000 nagura as well and mostly use them to smooth out the surface after flattening. I'll also use the 3000 to build a slurry when using that stone for polishing. I'd say, the Naniwa nagura are pretty cheap, especially if you throw them in the cart with the stones when you already have free shipping.

In the end, not necessary, but nice to have to keep the stones smooth after flattening and to refresh the surface as needed.
This was my thought as well. Nice to have but not neccessary. Thank you.
 
i would probably get the 2k naniwa pro instead. its one of my absolute favorite stones.

protip: you can rub the 2 stones together to get rid of the atoma scratches.
Kinda late, I already made my purchase. Can always buy another later down the road though.

Do you find that the pro is better than the chosera? Or you just like the 2k grit the best?
 
Kinda late, I already made my purchase. Can always buy another later down the road though.

Do you find that the pro is better than the chosera? Or you just like the 2k grit the best?
Pro and Chosera are essentially the same. Chosera has a base attached and is a few mm thicker. Pro has no base attached. But they are the same stones otherwise.
 
I have the NP 800 and 3000 and the Atoma 140 plate. The only drawback to not using a nagura after flattening with the atoma is it leaves the surface of the 800 and 3000 pretty scratchy (the scratches are visible and the stone feels a little rougher in use for the first few passes). I have the Naniwa 800 and 3000 nagura as well and mostly use them to smooth out the surface after flattening. I'll also use the 3000 to build a slurry when using that stone for polishing. I'd say, the Naniwa nagura are pretty cheap, especially if you throw them in the cart with the stones when you already have free shipping.

In the end, not necessary, but nice to have to keep the stones smooth after flattening and to refresh the surface as needed.

I can confirm the smoothing out with a naniwa nagura. Got one with my chosera 600 and used it on the 600 and on a pro 400. A little bit too much and you glaze your stones, so beware.
 
I have the NP 800 and 3000 and the Atoma 140 plate. The only drawback to not using a nagura after flattening with the atoma is it leaves the surface of the 800 and 3000 pretty scratchy (the scratches are visible and the stone feels a little rougher in use for the first few passes). I have the Naniwa 800 and 3000 nagura as well and mostly use them to smooth out the surface after flattening. I'll also use the 3000 to build a slurry when using that stone for polishing. I'd say, the Naniwa nagura are pretty cheap, especially if you throw them in the cart with the stones when you already have free shipping.

In the end, not necessary, but nice to have to keep the stones smooth after flattening and to refresh the surface as needed.
Where do you purchase naniwa nagura? I have been thinking about getting some for my stones as well. Which are literally the same as the OP even the Atoma.
 
Synthetic waterstones are designed to not need nagura in the traditional sense, i.e. to raise a working slurry.

I believe most of these things are basically for reconditioning or cleaning the surface, and you can do that with another stone, or the atoma tbh. It'd be pointless spending money on one unless it comes free with a stone. I've got a handful and I don't use them ever.

(Basically exactly what @Pie said in the first answer.)
 
Synthetic waterstones are designed to not need nagura in the traditional sense, i.e. to raise a working slurry.

I believe most of these things are basically for reconditioning or cleaning the surface, and you can do that with another stone, or the atoma tbh. It'd be pointless spending money on one unless it comes free with a stone. I've got a handful and I don't use them ever.

(Basically exactly what @Pie said in the first answer.)
Interesting so rubbing my 800 and 3000 together should help the surface finish after using the Atoma?

I was just thinking about adding some to my order like Heckel said if I was ordering some stones anyways. I don’t have any at the moment.
 
Interesting so rubbing my 800 and 3000 together should help the surface finish after using the Atoma?

I was just thinking about adding some to my order like Heckel said if I was ordering some stones anyways. I don’t have any at the moment.


Yep! I do this kind of thing all the time to smooth out the surface after atoma lapping, though mostly on harder or finer natural stones. On 800 and 3k synths I'd usually just leave the atoma finish tbh. It'll just make the stones act quite quickly for a little while, which tends to be quite a good thing for knife sharpening anyway.
 
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Yeah the binder for synthetic stones is pretty soft, so you won't be left with the scratch patten very long at all. Like, maybe 2-5" of sharpening. As your plate wears, this will be even more true.

The small grooves can even help hold water on the surface, which will help loosen abrasive and speed initial sharpening as was mentioned.

Unless you’re doing something incredibly fine like razors or single bevel ura sharpening, I wouldn’t sweat this at all. If you are doing that really fine sharpening, then you can start to think about surface prep. Surface prep is definitely “a thing”, but generally only for those really fine tasks.
 
Pro and Chosera are essentially the same. Chosera has a base attached and is a few mm thicker. Pro has no base attached. But they are the same stones otherwise.
Like others said, not really necessary, but if you do want to get them, I got them from Naniwa Nagura Stone
 
The other alternative of course if you do want one is just to cut a bit off the end or corner of the stone... take about 30 seconds with a saw.
 
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