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NEW. WTB heirloom to pass on

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Peterskchung

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Hi All.
I had an idea after spending covid thanksgiving with only my wife and two young kids.
I'd like to buy a knife that I can use as an ceremonial heirloom for carving and pass down the generations (until the degenerate third grandson pawns it for some blow and hookers).
I've tentatively landed on a yanagi from purely for aesthetics most likely from sakai. Preferably from an old master.
Any ideas or advice would be appreciated.

Thanks.
 

daveb

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Welcome. I'm moving your intro(?) to the Kitchen Knife forum where it will get more visibility.

Meanwhile suggest you consider the much more versatile sujihiki for your heirloom carving knife rather than the fish centric yanagiba.

There's a "Which Knife" questionnaire there that may get you recommendations tailored to your requirements, including budget constraints.

If I was buying a knife today for what you've described, both of these would be on my short list:

 

AFKitchenknivesguy

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I'm a huge Rader fan, although you indicated you are looking at a yanagiba, which is single edged. Would you prefer a suji, or double edged knife? Its much more applicable to western cooking such as Thanksgiving.
 

nwshull

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What do you mean by ceremonial? I sort of like the idea but I also am cautious because I think ceremonial I think this:
. And turkeys can be pretty damaging on a blade if you don't know what you're doing, which you only get through regular usage.
 

Peterskchung

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What do you mean by ceremonial? I sort of like the idea but I also am cautious because I think ceremonial I think this:
. And turkeys can be pretty damaging on a blade if you don't know what you're doing, which you only get through regular usage.
Bahaha!

I'm just gonna bring it out, start the first slice, clean it then put it back.

Single blade definitely.

I'll look into Rader.

For a budget, let's put it at 1-2k. Something tells me a Rader is not possible. But is it possible to get a "special" piece in that budget? Not really looking to get a commercially available one but a one off and preferably inscribed.

And this is purely an extension of my narcissism so the degenerate grandson can say I started it.

This is my process. Know nothing about something..want it..then have to research (with the help of those who are on hobbyist forums of course).

Hope to learn a lot from you guys. Thanks!
 

big D

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As soon as he is trusted to handle knives, get him some sharpening stones. Start there.
Best
D.
 

Ruso

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As heirloom look at honyaki Yanagibas in white 1 or 2. Beautiful hamon, hard knife. Should be at least 330mm to look impressive.
I totally understand your desire for a yanagi instead of a slicer for ceremonial type of use. Yanagi looks dope. You can also look at Takohiki (square tip Yanagiba).

Sorry, I can not recommend any particular makers though.
 

ExistentialHero

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Hard to ignore this beauty and its within budget. Johannes knives are top shelf and this blade would make a gorgeous special occasion slicer
At 45cm that might be bigger than the turkey. I dig it.
 

Corradobrit1

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Certainly makes a statement. Hire it out for knighting on the side.
 

WildBoar

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For ceremonial I would go Bill Burke (not sure what his list/ wait is like), Michael Rader or Randy Haas (HHH). Randy can make some very cool stuff, with carvings along the spine, etc., plus his damascus is up there with the some of the best.
 

Corradobrit1

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For ceremonial I would go Bill Burke (not sure what his list/ wait is like), Michael Rader or Randy Haas (HHH). Randy can make some very cool stuff, with carvings along the spine, etc., plus his damascus is up there with the some of the best.
Pretty sure Burke and Rader would be over budget (and least for their fancier offerings), plus does anyone know how long the wait list is for a Burke?
 

WildBoar

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Pretty sure Burke and Rader would be over budget (and least for their fancier offerings), plus does anyone know how long the wait list is for a Burke?
Whoops -- missed the follow-up with $1-2k budget. I would definitely talk to Randy Haas.
 

Boynutman

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For me, heirloom doesn't mean expensive. Rather it means old used and looked after with care. It can be cheap and ordinary even (at least in its original days).
I do appreciate the tradition and magic you're after. But I always feel you don't buy heirloom, you create it over time. No need to spend a boatload.

(that being said, go crazy!)
 

Jovidah

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Have you considered the possibility that your kinds might end up marrying fanatic vegans, resulting in soyboy grandchildren? Are you comfortable with the idea of your expensive knife being used to carve soybrisket and veganturkey? ;)

I second boynutman's sentiment though... while it would help if it at least it wasn't bog-standard factory product produced in the millions, I think the tradition and history behind it means more than the original purchase cost.
Then again we're both Dutch so that might be our Dutch cheapness shining through. Here's to heirloom plastic tableware...
 

ynot1985

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Pretty sure Burke and Rader would be over budget (and least for their fancier offerings), plus does anyone know how long the wait list is for a Burke?
I would jump on the list now. it's only going to get longer. No idea how long the wait is. It was 2 years in 2016 when I git my one (luckily, i didnt have to wait)

I heard that he is devoting more thing to hunters and outdoor stuff. It's far more lucrative than kitchen knives.
 
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