(partly) adding curve to flat spot

Discussion in 'Sharpening Station' started by childermass, May 15, 2019.

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  1. May 15, 2019 #1

    childermass

    childermass

    childermass

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    Hi all!
    I have a question:
    I got a knife with a huge flat spot in front of the heel (over 10cm). I would like to add a gentle curve to the first few centimeters closer to the tip to make board contact a little more smooth when rocking.
    Any tips on how to approach this? If possible I don’t want to do this in one session but rather add the curve during continuous sharpening.
     
  2. May 15, 2019 #2

    HRC_64

    HRC_64

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    IMHO... only way to get proper profile trasitions = breadknife it
    just use light pressure, you don't need to crush the edge or anything crazy...
     
  3. May 15, 2019 #3

    childermass

    childermass

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    Where did the rest of your post go?
    I was afraid that breadknifing will be the answer.
    You mentioned a backbevel in your full post, can you please explain to me what that means?
    Thanks!
     
  4. May 15, 2019 #4

    HRC_64

    HRC_64

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    This is why I tried to keep my response brief. it may be better to let other people chime in. ;)

    Once you decide how make the profile alteration, there is perhaps further discussion about how to make
    a profile alteration more generally...ie...attack the front or the back
    (or a combination includin the back)...and what are the pro and cons of each

    A backbevel is done at the back of the flat spot to avoid the profile ending in a "thud",
    it can be done very subtle to keep most of the inherent "flatness" in terms of cutting,
    but its noticeble addition to 'fluidity'.

    I wouldn't get into this dicussion too far tho until you are comfortable with breadknifing,
    otherwise you'd need to be a jedi-master sharpener to make these kinds of alterations.

    Don't let this intimidate you, however, as very subtle changes can do a lot of good
    and re-establishing the edge after a very sutble change is not that bad.

    But the key is SUBTLE ... using light pressure...this is not "reprofiling" like
    turning a tipped knife into a santoku or something...its more blending
    in a smooth profile from one with a couple flaws or whatever...
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2019
  5. May 16, 2019 #5

    chinacats

    chinacats

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    Just make your cutting motion on the (side of a) stone...you'l wind up with a rather natural profile that cuts well (after thinning).
     
  6. May 16, 2019 #6

    Benuser

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    Try first by just lifting the heel a tad.
     
  7. May 16, 2019 #7

    childermass

    childermass

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    Thanks everyone, some great advice here already.
    I will try to lift the heel a bit before I go deeper into the profile and see how that works. This will be necessary anyway, I realized that the last centimeter of the blade is a little higher than the flat area in front of it.
     
  8. May 16, 2019 #8

    Smashmasta

    Smashmasta

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    Ideally breadknife on a diamond stone because bread knifing is also the most efficient way to gouge whetstones, especially low grit since they're so porous.
     
  9. May 16, 2019 #9

    galvaude

    galvaude

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    1) breadknife to desired profile. Coarse crystolon on is about the best for this

    2) thin

    3) refinish to whatever you like

    4) set new edge
     
  10. May 16, 2019 #10

    chinacats

    chinacats

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    If you're referring to the heel itself, it should be just a touch higher or your knife will thud when you cut...it would be most annoying.
     
  11. May 16, 2019 #11

    HRC_64

    HRC_64

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    also, its easier to breadknife a slightly dulled knife ...
     
  12. May 16, 2019 #12

    labor of love

    labor of love

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    I hate “heel clunk” with a passion, hope everything works out for you.
     
  13. May 16, 2019 #13

    Benuser

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    That lifting of the heel is quite subtle. Just measured and the heel is perhaps a millimetre higher than the lowest point, which is at a distance of some 5mm from there.
     
  14. May 17, 2019 #14

    childermass

    childermass

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    That sounds quite doable. I got an old hardly used Carborundum combo stone lying around so I will possibly start with that.
    Going to lift the heel a bit in the process too.
    Pretty curious how this works out, I will keep you guys updated.
     

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