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What first and durable japanese knife should I get

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M1k3

That right angle choil triggers me
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Normal use. So not a knife that rusts easily or is brittle.

So to summarize, here are your proposals:
  • JCK Natures Deep Impact Series: semi-stainless / steel: Aogami Super (Blue Super) / HRC: 64-65 / weight: 182 g / 180 USD (sold out)
  • Tanaka Ginsan Nashiji : semi-stainless / steel: Ginsan core with stainless clad / HRC: 60-61 / weight: 174 g / 199 USD (sold out)
  • Kagekiyo Ginsan : semi-stainless / steel: Ginsan (Silver 3) stainless steel and cladded in stainless steel / HRC : ? / weight: 138 g / 350 USD (sold out)
  • Kagekiyo Ginsan : stainless / steel: ? / HRC : ? / weight: 134 g / 355 USD (sold out)
  • Kaeru Kasumi Stainless: stainless / steel: Hitachi SLD clad with softer stainless / HRC: ? / weight: 155 g / 200 USD
  • Kaeru Kasumi Workhorse : non-stainless / steel: White 2 steel with Iron Cladding / HRC: ? / weight: 206 g / 370 USD (sold out)
  • Munetoshi Kurouchi : non-stainless / steel: White Steel / HRC: ? / weight: 185 g / 250 USD
  • Gesshin Heiji : semi-stainless / steel: ? / HRC: ? / weight: 194 g / 350 USD (sold out)
You seem to recommend to me the Kaeru Kasumi Stainless. Moreover it's one of the only ones in the list to be available at the moment.
So I'm thinking of choosing it.
Anyone think I can make a better choice? For a knife on the list or not.
Just get the Kaeru. You can always buy something else and sell the Kaeru if you're not a fan.
 

jbou

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You can consider either a combo stone 1000/4000, or you can have a look at the Cerax 1000 which has good feedbacks and a good price. Bester 1200 is also often discussed.
Then (or now) you can buy a highest grit stone as a complement (3000 to 5000) like the Rika 5000 for exemple.
 

Wahnamhong

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OK and which stone to choose?
If you get a knife from JNS, why not buy a stone there?

FWIW I have a Munetoshi petty from JNS and it’s very good and quite practical in real life for a home cook. I’m considering getting the 210 gyuto at some point. Haven’t tried the Kaeru ss.
 

GBT-Splint

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There could be this stone at JNS if 8000 is not too thin : JNS combo 1000/8000 Matukusuyama
I didn't tried that particular stone but if it's the only stone you are going to have then 8000 is too high a grit.
(I find that 1000/8000 is a very weird double stone and don't quite understand it to be fair)

I would suggest (if you want to get everything from JNS) that you buy the JNS 1000 and JNS red aoto.
They are great stones (some would argue that the red aoto is best for single or wide bevel but I use it with pleasure with my double bevel knives)
 

JaVa

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I wouldn't call Tanaka ginsan semiSS. It's full on SS. So no patina tendencies. It weighs pretty close to 200g. Give or take a couple g,

And some one mentioned thin behind the edge and oh yes, it is and that's where the magic happens. Mine gets a thorough workout in a pro kitchen all the time with no issues. I don't baby it, but don't abuse it either.

The Kaeru is semiSS and is lighter of the two. It is less blade heavy too. It has a very nice convex grind and contrary to what JNS site states it's not wide bevel.

The Tanaka ginsan nashiji is noticeably heavier (but still a middle weight) and is also more blade heavy. It has a wide bevel with a slight hollow grind and like already mentioned is exceptionally thin behind the edge.

Cutting performance is great on both.
So the sleeker looking and lighter Kaeru or the more rugged looking and heavier Tanaka?
Personally I love both. And you really can't go wrong with either. Hope that helps?
 

Bean

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I wouldn't call Tanaka ginsan semiSS. It's full on SS. So no patina tendencies. It weighs pretty close to 200g. Give or take a couple g,

And some one mentioned thin behind the edge and oh yes, it is and that's where the magic happens. Mine gets a thorough workout in a pro kitchen all the time with no issues. I don't baby it, but don't abuse it either.

The Kaeru is semiSS and is lighter of the two. It is less blade heavy too. It has a very nice convex grind and contrary to what JNS site states it's not wide bevel.

The Tanaka ginsan nashiji is noticeably heavier (but still a middle weight) and is also more blade heavy. It has a wide bevel with a slight hollow grind and like already mentioned is exceptionally thin behind the edge.

Cutting performance is great on both.
So the sleeker looking and lighter Kaeru or the more rugged looking and heavier Tanaka?
Personally I love both. And you really can't go wrong with either. Hope that helps?
This helps, thank you!

Indeed, both steels must be resistant to oxidation:

Hitachi SLD :
Carbon (C)Chromium (Cr) Molybdenum (Mo)Vanadium (V)
1.6%13%1.2%0.5%

Gin3 :
Carbon (C)Chromium (Cr) Molybdenum (Mo)Vanadium (V)
1.03%13.75%--

Good summary by Jova. I was just trying to give a warning earlier, since I had the impression op didn't want something too delicate. With a little care the Tanaka is awesome. Imo.



This is the best bang for buck combo stone imo and all you really need


(I believe imanishi made ceramic)
Seeing the price I guess the quality is not so good. But I guess I won't see the difference and the combo stone is more practical.
 

Eloh

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It's pretty highly regarded actually... Some might prefer different stones, but that's highly subjective anyway. Most people who know their stuff would say it's a very good stone, especially for the money.
If money wasn't of any concern I would probably recommend a naniwa Pro progression (1000 and 3000) but they won't make your knives sharper either, especially if you haven't extensive sharpening experience...
 

inferno

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This helps, thank you!

Indeed, both steels must be resistant to oxidation:

Hitachi SLD :
Carbon (C)Chromium (Cr) Molybdenum (Mo)Vanadium (V)
1.6%13%1.2%0.5%

Gin3 :
Carbon (C)Chromium (Cr) Molybdenum (Mo)Vanadium (V)
1.03%13.75%--



Seeing the price I guess the quality is not so good. But I guess I won't see the difference and the combo stone is more practical.
you can look up the actual compositions here from the manufacturer.

sld is hitachis tight tolerance "middle of the road %" version aisi d2.
its not stainless, so it will discolor and rust if you neglect it. it just takes a longer time. but so will most "real" stainless steels too.

zknives says this about gin3: It is a AEB-H/19c27 clone like VG-1 and MBS26, so it is also similar to what is found in the Suisin Inox Honyaki knives.

so any of those could be worth looking into too.

one thing i have noticed is that you can get gin3 as a monosteel blade with no cladding, but sld/skd11 usually comes clad in stainless or something else. i can't remember seeing any skd11/sld monos ever.
 
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