Your thoughts on Wakui vs Yoake

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What would you expect from a 210 (matched by price) as far as comparisons of these two? I know these are known for their wabi-sabi, but would like to hear (on avg) which is best out of the box, easiest to tune, best after a tune up, and what to expect to bring each to the same higher standard. Which way are these trending as far as changes, quality?
 
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Yoake makes an amazing project knife. Lots of potential. But I definitely wouldn't give one as a gift to anyone.
Good point - the only downside with getting a Wakui migaki as your first knife is that you will probably be disappointed by everything else at the same price point until you up your budget quite a bit!
 
No, no project knife as a first knife. See, he's very capable, and hand planes his custom built furniture. This is just to get him hooked with a good carbon cutting edge... then I'll reel him in!! (We fish together too)

After my education above (thanks guys), looks like he'll get one of my 240 Yoakes and I'll be in the market for Wakui! See how that works?
Win/ win for me!!
 
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Man, if I was looking for a first carbon knife for a handy person I'd have to spend some serious time considering the smoking deals on Hatsukokoro's on Home Butcher right now. With the discount code there's values to be had there.
 
Hi,

It's been a while--I don't buy knives often! I'm thinking of getting my second knife based on recommendations here. My first was a Hiromoto AS 210. It's a gyuto.

Following this thread, I found a Magiki chefs knife, but it looks like only carbon steel and 6.5" cutting surface. for $365. Is that good??? Is the style of knife a nakiri?

Do you think that's big enough? I'm not real big, myself.

Thank you.
PS I'm looking up those words.
 
Following this thread, I found a Magiki chefs knife, but it looks like only carbon steel and 6.5" cutting surface. for $365. Is that good??? Is the style of knife a nakiri?

Do you think that's big enough? I'm not real big, myself.
Might be expensive, might be cheap. Can't really give an opinion one way or another without knowing what knife you're talking about.

As far as size, that's definitely smaller than your current Gyuto. If you think your current Gyuto is too big, then that might be a good fit for you.
 
M1K3, thanks for responding.
It is a nakiri knife.
and, yeah, if i could only try it. :). Might be moot—I didn’t bookmark it!
But I still don’t know what constitutes a good knife. Holding its edge, sharpness, balance and weight in my hand.
I‘m used to my rather thin gyuto, but I think I would like a smaller knife for veggies.
I have to get a new computer now, though. My air is getting weird.— I’ll be back
thanks, again,
Elizabeth
 
Might be expensive, might be cheap. Can't really give an opinion one way or another without knowing what knife you're talking about.

As far as size, that's definitely smaller than your current Gyuto. If you think your current Gyuto is too big, then that might be a good fit for you.

Sorry, I don't know what the Japanese words pertain to. this one is $360. The second one is $439. I have no idea if these are all too much to me, but they will probably last me my lifetime, the way I use them. I like the idea of a good vegetable cutter, that's small? I need another good knife.
Thanks for any thoughts.

"Blade length: 7.40 in.
Cutting edge length: 6.50 in.
Total length: 12.60 in.
Blade height (at heel): 2.00 in.
Blade thickness (near bolster): 0.14 in.
Blade thickness (at midpoint): 0.08 in.
Blade thickness (near tip): 0.07 in.
Item weight: 6.00 oz.
Shipment weight: 9.6 oz.
Blade: Shirogami 2 with stainless steel cladding, migaki
Bolster: Buffalo horn
Handle: Octagonal ho wood
Description: Toshihiro Wakui is one of the finest smiths in Sanjo, Japan. For several years, Wakui-san worked with Yoshikane. His skill in the forge and with heat treating is exceptional.
The nakiri usuba is a traditional Japanese knife form ideal for chopping and slicing fruits and vegetables, as well as boneless meats. The edge is double beveled, like a Western knife. Though sometimes called a vegetable cleaver, the thin edge geometry makes it a precision tool, rather than a Japanese equivalent to meat cleavers.
Wakui hand forged this knife. A central core of hard Shirogami #2 is set between thin layers of stainless steel, resulting in a keen, long lasting edge with easier maintenance. White steel is a favorite of sushi chefs for tasks requiring a very fine edge. It is a steel that tests the skill of the bladesmith in both forging and heat treating. The thin blade is distal tapered for optimal balance with a clean grind and no wedging. The spine is rounded for comfortable, effortless cuts.
The octagonal handle is comfortable for both right and left handed users. It is formed from ho wood, the traditional wood for Japanese knife handles. Ho wood holds up extremely well in the harsh environment of the kitchen. A buffalo horn ferrule completes the handle. "

Blade length: 7.40 in.
Cutting edge length: 6.50 in.
Total length: 12.40 in.
Blade height (at heel): 2.07 in.
Blade thickness (near bolster): 0.15 in.
Blade thickness (at midpoint): 0.10 in.
Blade thickness (near tip): 0.08 in.
Item weight: 7.40 oz.
Shipment weight: 11 oz.
Blade: San mai blade with an Aogami 2 carbon steel core
Bolster: Black pakkawood
Handle: Octagonal ebony handle
Description: Toshihiro Wakui is one of the finest smiths in Sanjo, Japan. For several years, Wakui-san worked with Yoshikane. His skill in the forge and with heat treating is exceptional.
The traditional Japanese nakiri is ideal for chopping and slicing fruits and vegetables, as well as boneless meats. The edge is double beveled, like a Western knife. Though sometimes called a vegetable cleaver, the thin edge geometry makes it a precision tool, rather than a Japanese equivalent to meat cleavers.
Wakui hand forged this knife. A central core of hard Aogami #2 is set between nashiji finished carbon steel, resulting in a keen, long lasting edge. Blue steel (aogami) is a favorite of professional chefs due to the exceptionally long lasting edge. The thin blade is distal tapered for optimal balance with a clean grind and no wedging. The spine is rounded for comfortable, effortless cuts.
The octagonal handle is comfortable for both right and left handed users. It is formed from ebony. This dense wood holds up exceptionally well to the harsh environment of the kitchen. A black pakkawood ferrule completes the handle. Like other kitchen knives, this knife should not be put in a dishwasher. We recommend using camellia oil to avoid rust.
This is sure to become a goto knife in your kitchen.
 
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