Are These Naniwa Nagura Stones Any Good?

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They have a Nagura stone for every grit of sharpening stone. My question is are they worth the space they would take up?

 
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They have a Nagura stone for every grit of sharpening stone. My question is are they worth the space they would take up?

I have an 800 and a 3000. They make nice slurry and I like playing with them with different stones and seeing the finish created.
 

Benuser

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The dressing stone that used to be delivered with all Choseras has a 600 grit. Still available, and much cheaper. No contamination with finer stones, even when used with a 8k Junpaku 'Snow-white'. Some contamination with coarser stones as the 600 and 400, but that's hardly a problem.
 

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I used that standard nagura (from chosera 600) on my naniwa pro 400. All it did was glaze the 400 in seconds.

I find the 400 to glaze very fast anyway and don't like it for that reason (the 600 doesnt glaze at all / very very slowly, but is about as coarse as the 400 after a few minutes), but the 400 seems to get lots of love, so I might use the stone wrong or so.
 
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The dressing stone that used to be delivered with all Choseras has a 600 grit. Still available, and much cheaper.

In your opinion, I would be better off with the one 600 grit than with the range of grits on the dressing stones I linked to (which, depending on the grit, range in price from about $13 up to $25). I'm not sure I understand why, because as far as I know, Naniwa is a reputable company making quality goods, for a price that is far less. I appreciate the responses, but I still don't really know the answer to my question.
 

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Well, those naniwa nagura's are extremely big compared to some others i've seen.
That comes with a price I guess
 

Benuser

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The 600 stone costs only $9. The only reason I can see for choosing a nagura in the same grit as the stone that is to be dressed is in the fear for grit contamination. As explained, it doesn't apply with the 600.
Another relative advantage of the new high grit naguras is in not having to soak them.
By the way, if you have an Atoma you may use it as well for raising mudd.
I must admit, I don't see much advantage in having a lot of mudd to work through for normal sharpening with the Chosera/Naniwa Pro. It will contribute to further convexing of the very edge, which these stones already tend to.
Can be different when polishing out the scratches caused by thinning behind the edge.
 

mpier

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I have a 10,000 grit that I use at times with my 3k,5k and 8k stones they definitely change the way the stones feel at times and can leave a pretty nice finish. They are small and if I’m not mistaken there just cut supper stones I think.
 

mpier

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The dressing stone that used to be delivered with all Choseras has a 600 grit. Still available, and much cheaper. No contamination with finer stones, even when used with a 8k Junpaku 'Snow-white'. Some contamination with coarser stones as the 600 and 400, but that's hardly a problem.
[/QUOTE
IMO the 600 that comes with the Chosera is really only good for cleaning and minor corrections to the stones although it will clean the 400 it will not correct it. I’ve had my Chosera stones for over three years with constant use and the only one I’ve dished is the 400. The idea behind getting the Nagura stones is to use a them on lower grit stones to mix the two and get a better finish and I have found that it is actually effective and fun to try. That is why I use my 10000 on the lower grit stones like the 5k or 8k to get a little more refinement but I don’t do it all the time but it work well on my Yanagiba
 

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I used that standard nagura (from chosera 600) on my naniwa pro 400. All it did was glaze the 400 in seconds.

I find the 400 to glaze very fast anyway and don't like it for that reason (the 600 doesnt glaze at all / very very slowly, but is about as coarse as the 400 after a few minutes), but the 400 seems to get lots of love, so I might use the stone wrong or so.
You're not alone; I'm lukewarm about my 400 at best as well - while loving my 1k and 3k and frankly disliking my 5k.
My main issue is that even tho it feels like crap it doesn't feel like the 400 is really putting out a lot of work. Sometimes I get the feeling it's barely any faster than the 4k. Could entirely be user error, but I never have problems with the 1k and 3k (or the 5k once it's proper wet).
 

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You're not alone; I'm lukewarm about my 400 at best as well - while loving my 1k and 3k and frankly disliking my 5k.
My main issue is that even tho it feels like crap it doesn't feel like the 400 is really putting out a lot of work. Sometimes I get the feeling it's barely any faster than the 4k. Could entirely be user error, but I never have problems with the 1k and 3k (or the 5k once it's proper wet).

Yes thats something I also notice, very slow. I think it is the glazing: when I use SiC powder on the 400, it's faster then my 600 but only for a few minutes. At that point I can easily feel the corners of the 400 are still SiC coarse, but the rest is slick.
 

Pie

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They have a Nagura stone for every grit of sharpening stone. My question is are they worth the space they would take up?

I guess my reply would be, what do you intend to use them for?

Cleaning - can be useful for higher grit stones, but lower grit just take the atoma to it and flatten while you’re at it.

Conditioning - I’m not a pro at telling the differences between synthetic stone preps. Possibly useful? Idk, I’m guessing you can use another means to the end (a good edge, or a preferred polish)

Slurry building for polishing - mayyyybe. More interesting options available for the same space taken up? Alternatively learn to polish with good pressure control and be awesome. Just noticed @bsfsu ’s more educated reply. I stand corrected.

What other applications would you use it for? Anything it’s meant to do, I feel like other things can do better, by most metrics. Of course this could be due to my own incompetence as well, but I feel like they wouldn’t add much, if anything, to my sharpening or polishing process.

also NP400 is awesome. To noobs such as I.
 
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Ben.G.

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When I’m sharpening multiple knives, I’ll throw the Naniwa 600 dressing stone in some water just in case because it is just slightly faster than using the 140 Atoma to clean off stones during the process. I don’t use the 600 dressing stone on whetstones 400 grit and under or on polishing stones 5k and up.

I have a 12k Naniwa nagura to use on my 12k Shapton Pro. It is perfect for making a beautiful smooth slurry to get the stone going and doesn’t cause excessive wear on the expensive stone. (This is mostly just for fun, but sometimes I like to use the 12k to strop my nicer knives. Just a few light strokes to clean the apex.) On my 5k-8k stones, sometimes I use the 12k nagura after using the 1200 Atoma.
 
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When I’m sharpening multiple knives, I’ll throw the Naniwa 600 dressing stone in some water just in case because it is just slightly faster than using the 140 Atoma to clean off stones during the process. I don’t use the 600 dressing stone on whetstones 400 grit and under or on polishing stones 5k and up.

I have a 12k Naniwa nagura to use on my 12k Shapton Pro. It is perfect for making a beautiful smooth slurry to get the stone going and doesn’t cause excessive wear on the expensive stone. (This is mostly just for fun, but sometimes I like to use the 12k to strop my nicer knives. Just a few light strokes to clean the apex.) On my 5k-8k stones, sometimes I use the 12k nagura after using the 1200 Atoma.

I am brand new to sharpening on a waterstone. So far I have two Yoshihiro Toishi stones in 400 and 1000 grit. My practice knife is on the way, and but for a Nagura stone or two, I suppose I'm ready to start destroying the edge on it.
 
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