Best edge retention yet can be sharpened by electric sharpeners...

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This is somewhat of a blasphemy, but I need to find a knife that meets the following criteria
  • Excellent to best edge retention (yet ideally not chip) - less she has to sharpen it, less I have to hear about it :)
  • Can be sharpened on an electric sharpener - using Chefs Choice Trizor model
  • price below $100
Now, you may wonder why... It's for my aging mom, whom I got Victorinox 8" Chefs knife (how light it is) and paring knife.. But, she complains that it gets dull very often and even if she has electric sharpener, she still gets annoyed that she has to sharpen it once a week.

Her primary usage is cutting proteins (chicken, pork, beef), and veggies (hardest about carrot), mostly celery, potatoes, onions, scallions, garlic. Nothing like squash or anything hard

TIA :)
 
Have you thought about a better cutting board? I can't imagine how it gets dull in a week unless it is what she is cutting on.

I know years ago I tested Victorinox against my Henckels 4-star knife and I had to sharpen the Victorinox more often but a week I am not sure it would help.

I have no experience with a Chefs Choice sharpener.
 
Have you thought about a better cutting board? I can't imagine how it gets dull in a week unless it is what she is cutting on.

I know years ago I tested Victorinox against my Henckels 4-star knife and I had to sharpen the Victorinox more often but a week I am not sure it would help.

She has 1 of my cherry end grain boards and a nice japanese laminated board as well.. It's the same.. I think it's likely fairly low HRC...
 
There has to be something she is doing to dull it. Aging mom I assume you are talking home.
 
There has to be something she is doing to dull it. Aging mom I assume you are talking home.
no, not home, but I am fairly confident that he is not doing anything weird.. Edge seems to be evenly dull.. I even borrowed it in past and it doesn't retail it as well as I'd expect...
 
I'd have to guess a bit, not having experience with electric sharpeners, but I think in your position I'd be looking at Tojiro. I bought my wife a Tojiro in "Molybdenum steel," whatever that is, and the edge retention seems pretty darned good. I think it was around $50. It cost me more than that, because I had to pay for shipping from Japan, so that I could get the fire engine red handle, knowing that would please her, which it did.

Another possible suggestion, if the sharpener has both coarse and fine sides, might be to stick to the coarse.
 
I've seen home cooks scrape along the cutting board, with the knife perpendicular to the board, to gather up cut pieces. Seems like a great way to kill an edge fast.
I do that carefully and my edges at home last for months. I also scoop with my knife off the cutting board. I use an electric Worksharp sharpener.

I consider a knife dull when it won't slice tomatoes.
 
Ya, I was thinking of an used tojiro dp or misono moly teel... But, somewhat hoping there is some kinda beater powder steel around I am not aware of... (or will that eat electric sharpener)?
 
Wondering how those electric sharpeners perform a full deburring. A poor edge retention often has to do with incomplete deburring.

This.

Consider getting her a hanging strop (can put it behind a cupboard door or something and some can attach to drawers). Always handy, nothing fancy, just some swipes after sharpening. See if retention doesn't improve.
 
Wondering how those electric sharpeners perform a full deburring. A poor edge retention often has to do with incomplete deburring.
This.

Consider getting her a hanging strop (can put it behind a cupboard door or something and some can attach to drawers). Always handy, nothing fancy, just some swipes after sharpening. See if retention doesn't improve.
This.

Consider getting her a hanging strop (can put it behind a cupboard door or something and some can attach to drawers). Always handy, nothing fancy, just some swipes after sharpening. See if retention doesn't improve.
thanks. that sounds like a good idea. i think i have a strong somewhere that I need to find!
 
We have had our Victorinox (the modern one) for a few months and it gets used all the time and it can still cut paper towel. Weird that your mom's gets dull in a week. All we have done is strop it on a f.dicks rod most the time. I have yet to sharpen it.

Dishwasher maybe? My GF mom does that even though I told her not to and hers dull super quick, but they are like Tupperware branded.
 
You have have a difficult set of requirements. Perhaps unobtainable as currently presented.

Having a knife hold a sharp edge for one week is no problem. But it needs to be a high-quality steel to start with, it needs to be properly sharp to start with, and then they need to be nice to it. No dragging the blade across the cutting board or other poor practices.

To address each:

I've seen home cooks scrape along the cutting board, with the knife perpendicular to the board, to gather up cut pieces. Seems like a great way to kill an edge fast.
This was my first thought. Almost everyone in the general public does it, and it’s a simple fix, flip the knife over and use the spine to sweep food.

I’ve seen people say the don’t do this, then I watch them do it without thinking. Some self sabotage without knowing it. If a knife is dulling in a week (with a home cook), they’re probably doing something they shouldn’t.

My next thought was the cutting board, but it sounds like you’ve already gotten/made her a good one. 👍


cheap VG10, Like a used Tojiro DP.
This was my thought as well. However it’s hard enough that it can chip.

It really depends on their knife skills, and how nice they are to it. But above about HRC 58 things will chip if not careful. IIRC Tojiro VG10 is around 60-61.

This is a steel/brand I would recommend for my own mother, but I also wouldn’t be surprised if she chipped it at first while learning to use it. So they will need to be a little careful with it. That said it’s a good balance of durability, ability to hold a sharp edge, and edge retention. As long they’re willing to be nice to it, and accept some possible chips whilst learning.

Otherwise stick to knife below HRC58. Henkel Zwilling has a bolster free chef knife in that range. They regularly go on sale for $60 if you sign up on their website for sale notifications.




The last issue is going to be how it’s sharpened. Or put another way, the quality of the sharpening job.

The sharpener currently being used, to be perfectly honest, is absolutely abysmal. I personally wouldn’t use one, or even recommend one to anyone. They do a very poor job, and chew through steel on a knife like crazy. It’s also possible trying to sharpen a Tojiro VG10 with a sharpener like you’re using could create micro chips in the blade.

If you want to continue to use an electric sharpener, I would recommend a better one. Something like a Tormek, but those are quite expensive. Companies make cheaper clones, or similar lower cost versions, but no idea how well those were work. But any electric sharpener which works halfway decent is going to be expensive ($200-300+).

I would get something better than what you’re currently using. Something that will put a decent edge on the knife, and chew through less steel while doing it. You’re going to have to research here a little, increase your budget, and see what she’s willing to do/learn. But without a better sharpener, even with a decent knife skills and a good knife, you won’t achieve your goals.

Then as shared, having a strop will be helpful. To remove the burr, And help keep it sharp between sharpenings. This will also extend the life of the knife, as it won’t need to sharpened as often, and thus not grind the blade down as fast.


TL,DR:
Make sure she’s practicing good knife skills and not needlessly dulling the blade. Have a decent knife (the Vicorinox is probably fine, but you can certainly get something nicer). Lastly, a knife can’t hold a sharp edge if never had a decent edge to begin with. You’ll probably need a better sharpening system.



Hope this helps.
Cheers,
Nick
 
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Have you considered a vintage carbon steel knife like a Forgecraft, Old Hickory, etc.? They take a great edge, are damn tough and fairly easy to sharpen (even on an electric sharpener). I have a few things at YesterdaysKnives on Etsy.
 
Have you considered a vintage carbon steel knife like a Forgecraft, Old Hickory, etc.? They take a great edge, are damn tough and fairly easy to sharpen (even on an electric sharpener). I have a few things at YesterdaysKnives on Etsy.
Thats what my Grandparents used. I don't think they ever owned a stainless knife.
 
Have you considered a vintage carbon steel knife like a Forgecraft, Old Hickory, etc.? They take a great edge, are damn tough and fairly easy to sharpen (even on an electric sharpener). I have a few things at YesterdaysKnives on Etsy.
Sounds like a great choice, unless the person in question is like my wife. Nothing in the world would keep that knife out of the dishwasher with any consistency. Add on wiping it dry after use, and you might as well ask her to climb Everest.
 
Sounds like a great choice, unless the person in question is like my wife. Nothing in the world would keep that knife out of the dishwasher with any consistency. Add on wiping it dry after use, and you might as well ask her to climb Everest.
Is she into white handled NSF offset bread knives? If so, I think I've worked with her before in several kitchens
 
I sharpen my mother in laws knives and she will swear to me that she doesn't put them in the dishwasher. Problem is every time a help out after dinner and wash some dishes you can guess what I find in the top dishwasher rack.

The serrated knives is a great idea and I wouldn't be looking for anything overly nice.

She may tell you that she's not putting them in the dishwasher but think about it, if she's bothered by taking 10 seconds to pull them through an electric sharpener do you really think she's hand washing those knives?
 
I sharpen my mother in laws knives and she will swear to me that she doesn't put them in the dishwasher. Problem is every time a help out after dinner and wash some dishes you can guess what I find in the top dishwasher rack.

The serrated knives is a great idea and I wouldn't be looking for anything overly nice.

She may tell you that she's not putting them in the dishwasher but think about it, if she's bothered by taking 10 seconds to pull them through an electric sharpener do you really think she's hand washing those knives?
I was suggesting a soft carbon with a highly polished convexed relief bevel that would easily survive a year of home use with a polished steel rod with a light touch — both for the rod as the knife during its use. But the suggestion makes little sense when your slightly obstinate mother keeps using her dishwasher and an electric sharpener. Get her a simple Victorinox.
 
Ya, I was thinking of an used tojiro dp or misono moly teel... But, somewhat hoping there is some kinda beater powder steel around I am not aware of... (or will that eat electric sharpener)?
SRS13 is the answer. It edge will not need to be renewed for at least six months. Stropping on leather is all that is necessary for a refresh. Tsuenhisa makes an SRS13 Nakiri and Santoku for a low cost. Should be able to get one for $100
 
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