Cutting board

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by cooper, Jan 24, 2018.

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  1. Jan 24, 2018 #1

    cooper

    cooper

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    Been using the typical slide out cutting board that one finds in their lower kitchen cabinets but its time to get something better.....can't believe we've put up with it for all these years. My wife and I like to cook so we recently bought several Miyabi Fusion knives, I know there considered middle of the road compared to many I see here on the forum but that's ok, they are working out nicely for us. Anyway back to the cutting board, I see many to choose from and looking for something fairly large like 18"x24" give or take a few inches.....I've read mixed opinions regarding bamboo as many claim its to hard for our type of knives and could damage them if were not careful. I also see one's made from Cypress wood I think that many seem to like but also with mixed opinions, the same with teak wood.....most likely will be the case with any of the cutting boards I'm finding ha ha. Thinking to keep it simple and go for something like a Boos cutting board end grain type, they seem reasonable in cost and look nice. Were looking to keep it more on the affordable side at around $100-$150 range....be nice to go for one of the custom one's I see here on the forum with multi types of woods but not wanting to spend that kind of coin right now, were looking to do a complete kitchen re-do so bottom line for now is something that works for the time being and doesn't screw up our knives.....suggestions welcome and thanks.
     
  2. Jan 24, 2018 #2

    Paraffin

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    I'm a fan of the soft hinoki boards, probably the easiest on the blade edge without being too soft, and they're light enough for an easy carry to the sink for washing. You may, or may not, have a warping issue with these, so that's the major downside.

    I use the hinoki boards (large and smaller) for vegetables, and I use one Hi-Soft board (synthetic sort-of rubber) for meat and fish to avoid cross-contamination. I could just use another hinoki board for meat and fish, but using a synthetic one makes it easy to quickly grab the one I want for each purpose. Just don't get hard plastic for this. Use something like Hi-Soft that's softer.

    That's something to consider if you choose a large end-grain board. You might want a thin synthetic mat-type board to use on top of the butcher block, for some things like chicken with a higher salmonella risk. I know some folks just wipe down a single board and use it for everything, but I've started being more careful in my older years, when the immune system ain't what it used to be. I'd rather just swap out the boards, and give the meat/fish one an especially good cleaning in the sink. That's one of the reasons I don't use big end-grain boards, I want them light enough to easily carry.
     
  3. Jan 24, 2018 #3

    cooper

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    Thanks for the input....yes I've seen the Hinoki Japanese Cypress Wood boards, they look nice and reasonable cost wise and I like that they are light weight and move around easily.

    Are these types all the same and created equal or have you found a particular manufacture to buy these from? I see many on Amazon for cheap but small sizes.....I have spotted a few larger ones but at $225 is that the norm for pricing on the large one's?
     
  4. Jan 24, 2018 #4

    Paraffin

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    That $221 price seems very high for a plain hinoki board unless it's extra large size. The two I have are Shun, the medium (which is actually fairly small) at $50 and the large at $80. These were just the first I ran into, there are other sources like the ones here:

    https://www.cuttingboard.com/hinoki/

    And these are the ones I spotted recently with walnut edges for anti-warp:

    https://echefknife.com/product/yosh...-cutting-board-with-anti-twisting-walnut-rim/

    Don't over spend on hinoki boards, because while you can sand them to eliminate cutting lines and refresh the surface, I don't think of them as something that can last 10 or 20 years like some of the larger hardwood end-grain cutting boards. I'll replace 'em when I need to.
     
  5. Jan 24, 2018 #5

    cooper

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    I was looking for something in the 18"x24' and the first link you mentioned has them at $239.....it seems like once you get over the 12" x 20" or similar size they really jump up in price. I've seen several of the smaller and medium ones at about the $50-$80 range but was thinking going larger.....maybe its not necessary and having multiples of smaller ones is a better choice as you mentioned above regarding cross contamination. Appreciate the feedback, thanks.
     
  6. Jan 24, 2018 #6

    cooper

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    In my searching I ran across Kobi blocks cutting boards http://www.kobiblocks.com/cutting-boards/

    Anyone have experience with these, the walnut edge grain or cherry edge grain look nice. I like they do any size you want and the pricing seems reasonable.
     
  7. Jan 24, 2018 #7

    inferno

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    There are so many boards out there its a complete jungle. Just get one you like and be happy. If the knife gets dull, sharpen it.
    I kinda like sharpening my knives so I use plastic boards. zwilling with antislip borders.
     
  8. Jan 24, 2018 #8

    inferno

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  9. Jan 25, 2018 #9

    cooper

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    Ended up splurging a bit and went with a boardsmith......Choose the 16"x22" walnut.
     
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  10. Jan 26, 2018 #10

    chinacats

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    Best choice you could have made...even if you only went with the maple but the walnut is especially nice. These are made much better than the Boos which are actually fine but somewhat overrated.
     
  11. Jan 26, 2018 #11

    cooper

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    I think so too.....really looking forward in getting the Boardsmith.
     
  12. Jan 26, 2018 #12

    Gregmega

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    It sounds like you found your board, but I've long been a fan of composite cutting boards by Sani Tuff, they're super durable, not crazy expensive, and are very good for edge retention (they're fairly common in nicer restaurants). If you ever look to switch it up from wood, I highly suggest these. They also come in a range of sizes and thicknesses, so you wouldn't have to put yourself too far out to test the waters! Best of luck!
     
  13. Jan 26, 2018 #13

    cooper

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    I did check out the Sani Tuff boards and it was a consideration and still may be so for a second board.....I thought I read a few commenting the Sani Tuff boards to grab the edge of the knife a bit and one needs to be more aware of that, not sure if its true or not as I've not used one. I think I could eventually end up with two boards. Reading through the threads here on the forum many comment using multiple boards, one for vegi and such and the second for their meats & fish, etc...I can see that being a good approach.
     
  14. Jan 26, 2018 #14

    Paraffin

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    If you do go for a second board for protein, consider the Hi Soft brand as well as Sani Tuff. It's easy on the blade edge without being too "grabby" or sticking. That might happen if you do a lot of heavy chopping for vegetables, but I use my Hi Soft board only for meat and fish, where there isn't that much heavy blade action on the board. It's holding up very well so far. Very easy to clean.
     
  15. Jan 26, 2018 #15

    Grunt173

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    Shoot,I got a 15"x15" x2" end grain hardwood cutting board from Amazon for like $40.Looks just as good as some of those $200 boards.
     
  16. Jan 26, 2018 #16

    hmansion

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    A Boardsmith board is more like a piece of fine furniture for the kitchen! After years of mineral-oiling and bees-waxing, they take a rich, luminous glow that is a pleasure to work on. Love my maple 18”x24”!

    I don’t hear so much about San Jamar here, but I highly recommend their Tuff-Cut boards for a secondary meats-cheeses-other-harder-to-clean-items board. I have multiples of them and over the years they’ve held up great with no warping. I just throw it in the dishwasher after spatchcocking a chicken or slicing a roast...

    San Jamar TC121812GV Tuff-Cut High Tech Resin Grooved Cutting Board, 18" Width x 12" Height x 1/2" Depth https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001BQTZHQ/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 24, 2018
  17. Jan 26, 2018 #17

    chinacats

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    Of you wind up with a second board of just get another Boardsmith...maybe cherry? I have an older mahogany that just keeps getting better...unfortunately these are no longer available.

    As to needing 2 boards, 'nah but I do have a 🍁 as backup;)

    Next backup will be a two-tone...:wink:
     
  18. Jan 26, 2018 #18

    inferno

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    Just a question. Why mineral oil and not a hardening oil like tung oil?
     
  19. Jan 26, 2018 #19

    Grunt173

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    Tung oil is advised against for use as a cutting board oil because some people might have nut allergies.That is my understanding from various reads.
     
  20. Jan 26, 2018 #20

    inferno

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    i see. I like it though. All my knife handles have like 10-20 layers tung, and pretty much everything wood that I will "water cycle" gets tung oil. so it lasts.
     
  21. Jan 26, 2018 #21

    cooper

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    Just for giggles I bought a Boos walnut just to check out, never had one before.....overall looks arn't bad but one can easily tell its a mass production board, your typical hi and low spots through out, glue joints are a bit more present, etc.....Not sure I'll keep it as a second board. The Sani Tuff mentioned looks interesting and may get one to check out. Sure looking forward in getting the Boardsmith walnut board.....A second Boardsmith could also be in my future but need to put the first one though its paces.
     
  22. Nov 10, 2018 #22

    matbel

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    For my part, I have magnetic cutting board. Very simple design with an end that can hold my chef knife. From bloc poisson. Boos..... never again.
     
  23. Nov 10, 2018 #23

    Stx00lax

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    Did the same. Pricey, but totally worth it. Insanely well made, looks gorgeous, great people to deal with and you are supporting a small American business. It gets tons of compliments
     
  24. Nov 11, 2018 #24

    Kgp

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    5D43AEE1-FC69-46E1-821C-304F5702E99F.jpeg 9152EB33-2BA3-40B1-8BF7-210BA9012220.jpeg

    Here's my Boardsmith. This was five years ago when new. Still perfect.

    Ken
     
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  25. Nov 12, 2018 #25

    Mattai

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    As a non-American board member I can throw in this concept from Germany into the ring: the 'Frankfurter Brett'.

    Although the price is a bit overrated and definitely has some hipster-tax on it I fell in love with the concept and bought myself one.

    I love cooking with this thing. I added quite an amount of GN-bowls to my kitchen (GN = Gastronorm...a size standard for European kitchen utensil measures) and got rid of all the hassle when preparing and cutting and storing 15 ingredients in advance of cooking.

    Check this here:
    https://www.frankfurter-brett.de

    Cheers,
    Mateus
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2018
  26. Nov 12, 2018 #26

    gman

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    i'm using a Mediera teak board, and so far so good after 2.5 years of use. tolerates being wet very well, even when i get lazy and don't oil it for long periods of time. hasn't warped in the slightest, even only using one side (because it has legs). also seems to be a good level of softness. some of my knives stick into it when they are freshly sharpened, but i don't rock chop, so no concerns about chipping (i guess that might be a problem if i did rock chop), and they stay sharp for a long time.

    my previous board was bamboo and i absolutely hated it. warped like crazy, dulled my knives really quickly, and eventually split down the middle, despite frequent oiling.
     
  27. Nov 13, 2018 #27

    Bill13

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  28. Nov 13, 2018 #28

    Corradobrit1

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    Hunted around for a long time to find a good end grain board for a reasonable price. Found this guy on Ebay and bought one of his larger walnut boards when they were on sale. Been using it for the last 3 years and it still looks new with just a 1-2 month oil treatment.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Black-Waln...Swcu5URGQQ:sc:UPSGround!75061!US!-1:rk:6:pf:0

    I even bought a couple of seconds to use as amplifier stands.
     
  29. Nov 15, 2018 #29

    John Loftis

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    This is the first time I've noticed this thread, but I just wanted to pop in and say thanks all for the kind words about the BoardSMITH. Really makes my day to be appreciated for what we're trying to do.

    There are lots of ways to go with cutting boards; always pros and cons of quality, price, sustainability, longevity, knife feel, aesthetics, etc. Our goal has always been to make the best possible product. We aren't the cheapest, certainly, but it's really gratifying to see our boards still being regularly used and enjoyed 2, 5, and even 10 years (thanks David Smith) down the road.

    For those who are price conscious, I almost always have manufacturer's seconds available. I don't always take the time to photograph and upload them, but there are always a few boards that don't quite make the cut aesthetically (by my standards). I believe that our 'seconds' are likely far prettier and better made than most companies' 'firsts.' So reach out to me directly if you'd like a BoardSMITH board at a discount and I can see what I've got kicking around.

    We've also got a bunch of one-offs listed on the website (specials and seconds page).

    To answer an earlier question, I wouldn't finish/protect a butcher block with anything other than mineral oil and board butter (mineral oil and beeswax). I haven't used it, but there's also a fairly new product made from refined coconut oil that probably would work fine as well (has to be the refined stuff-- non-refined can go rancid). If you don't have moral issues with petroleum products, just stick with mineral oil. The refined coconut oil is extremely expensive and I don't know if it works as well as traditional butcher block oil.
     
  30. Dec 1, 2019 #30

    Bert2368

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    Bit of thread necromancy here.

    Herself decided that she wasn't going to let ME have all the wood shop fun time... And had watched a bunch of YouTube videos to learn how those fancy patterned edge grain cutting boards she likes are made.

    Her first batch is shown here, all glued up, most of them are surface sanded. Down to routing rounded edges and possibly some finger grooves to make them easy to pick up & then oiling and waxing.

    She has not lost any fingers (yet), had one nasty kick back from a piece of wood that pinched the blade on our table saw, resulting in an amazing bruise. I've had to pull a lot of splinters out of her. But overall, she thinks it's been worth it.

    20191130_192330.jpg
     
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