Cutting board

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by cooper, Jan 24, 2018.

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  1. Dec 9, 2019 #61

    Bert2368

    Bert2368

    Bert2368

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    You have flashbacks about ME? Have we met?? Back before my unfortunate accidental fall, perhaps??? All I can remember from before the accident is some weird synthesizer sounds and hopping, for some reason.
     
  2. Dec 9, 2019 #62

    Corradobrit1

    Corradobrit1

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    Nice work. Walnut and maple?
     
  3. Dec 9, 2019 #63

    LostHighway

    LostHighway

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    Hinoki will be lighter than a Hi-Soft board of equivalent size. Hinoki does have a couple significant flaws IMO it both stains easily and tends to absorb odors readily. Wetting the board before each uses reduces but does not eliminate these issues. Hi-Soft will also stain but less so than Hinoki IMO. The 15.4" x 10.2" Hasegawa is currently oos at MTC Kitchen but they do have this smaller size https://www.mtckitchen.com/hasegawa-wood-core-soft-rubber-cutting-board-13-4-x-9-1-x-0-8-ht/ available and their sale continues through the 16th. I haven't personally used a Hasegawa but they should be lighter than a Hi-Soft. I'm considering purchasing this top layer sheet https://www.mtckitchen.com/nsf-soft-rubber-cutting-board-23-5-x-11-8/ without the wood core, to use on top of plastic boards.
     
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  4. Dec 9, 2019 #64

    ian

    ian

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  5. Dec 9, 2019 #65

    panda

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  6. Dec 9, 2019 #66

    Bert2368

    Bert2368

    Bert2368

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    Walnut, American wild cherry, sugar maple.

    Wish butternut was still a (relatively) cheap hardwood as it was when I was repeatedly given it for my highschool woodshop projects back in the 1970's.
     
  7. Dec 9, 2019 #67

    mc2442

    mc2442

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    mc2442 said:
    I have flashbacks of Q-Bert looking at them.
    You have flashbacks about ME? Have we met?? Back before my unfortunate accidental fall, perhaps??? All I can remember from before the accident is some weird synthesizer sounds and hopping, for some reason.

    upload_2019-12-8_20-37-46.jpeg
     
  8. Dec 9, 2019 #68

    LostHighway

    LostHighway

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    How large is your Hi-Soft? I have the 15.75"(40cm) x 11.5"(29.2cm ) from Korin and, so far, it has remained quite flat. I understand that the larger Hi-Soft boards tend to sag if unsupported but mine is small enough to be quite rigid for carrying. I hand wash all my boards rather than running through the dishwasher.
    The black polyethylene boards from Korin interest me as they are said to be relatively soft. I may try one in the future. I have owned softer plastic boards in the past but both my current plastic boards, an OXO and a San Jamar with the molded-in hook, are quite hard and noticeably less kind to edges than the Hi-Soft or end grain cherry.
    I remain curious about both the Hasegawas with the wood core and those that are only the thin surface mat part but I wonder about their durability. You can sand down the Hi-Soft if it becomes discolored and cut up but the Hasegawas don't give you much depth to work with.
     
  9. Dec 9, 2019 #69

    McMan

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    Meant to reply to this earlier... The Michigan maple are nice (I've had a few), though the maple can be a little hit or miss in terms of what ends up in the block--a lot of diversity. Still, IMO a better product than Boos. A couple things to think about--first, the Michigan maple blocks use square endgrain, which means more glue joints, and the endgrain is not alternated but random, so it'll be slightly less dimensionally stable; second, these things are 3.5" tall. I'm not sure how tall you are, but adding 3.5" to a counter top can make a difference. For me the extra height was great, but I'm tall.

    So you're right, all roads lead to Boardsmith, and for a few reasons... First, the boards use rectangle engrain, so less glue joints. Second, they alternate the endgrain, so more dimensional stability than random. Third, they're not super tall. Fourth, cherry! (A cherry from Boardsmith will be the next board I get. Slightly softer than maple.)
     
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  10. Dec 11, 2019 #70

    SeattleBen

    SeattleBen

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    Add small family business to reasons one would support Boardsmith.
     
  11. Dec 11, 2019 #71

    sleepy

    sleepy

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    I ended up going with the Konosuke hinoki board from Bernal Cutlery, the other options were just a bit too pricey for what I'm looking for right now. Thanks for the suggestions though, everyone!
     

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