Getting rid of garlic and onion smells

Discussion in 'The BoardSMITH' started by John Loftis, Feb 28, 2019.

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  1. Feb 28, 2019 #1

    John Loftis

    John Loftis

    John Loftis

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  2. Feb 28, 2019 #2

    CoteRotie

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    Great tip, thanks for posting it. Sounds like it might work for fingers too if the old stainless steel trick doesn't work.
     
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  3. Feb 28, 2019 #3

    HRC_64

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    Intersting article...
    flavours definitely infuse into the conditioning oil of wood boards,
    my preferred method is to avoid the problem altogether and use
    dedicated aromatic prep boards, even if they are plastic.
     
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  4. Feb 28, 2019 #4

    Bodine

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    I love the smell of garlic and onions, why get rid of it.
     
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  5. Feb 28, 2019 #5

    CoteRotie

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    Well, yeah.. but if you're slicing strawberries for a vanilla panda cotta topping SOME people might not like them to smell like garlic. Unless maybe you're at the Gilroy Garlic Festival where garlic ice cream is always a hit.
     
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  6. Feb 28, 2019 #6

    WildBoar

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    I've had good luck with white vinegar or lemon juice. Grating potatoes or apples seems like more more then necessary.
     
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  7. Feb 28, 2019 #7

    Mucho Bocho

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    I find that just moisturizing the board with oil or board butter cuts most of the smell. I've never found lemon or vinegar useful, but then again, my board fits in the sink and is at least rinsed each time I use it in cold water. I find boards pick up smells most when on the dry side. I use my board undiscriminately for both meat and veg.
     
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  8. Feb 28, 2019 #8

    Mjdavid

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    This sounds like a great idea and I’m gonna try it. I’ve had decent success with (industry standard?) kosher salt and lemon juice.
     
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  9. Feb 28, 2019 #9

    WildBoar

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    x2. Salt with either vinegar or lemon juice is very effective. This is what I do for my wife's board periodically, as she tends to leave things the remnants of cut produce on the board on a daily basis.
     
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  10. Feb 28, 2019 #10

    Xenif

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    I save the ends of my lemons and limes to do that, I find the soft pith (white stuff) helps take out a lot of imbedded smells.
     
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  11. Feb 28, 2019 #11

    Mjdavid

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    That’s a good idea. The pith is what contains all those bitter (tanic?) compounds...that must have some neutralizing effect on garlic and onions?
     
  12. Mar 5, 2019 #12

    mattador

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    Same, but I throw on some salt to help give it an abrasive scrubbing effect.
     
  13. Mar 6, 2019 #13

    Benuser

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    Not really surprised as I noticed apple almost neutralises garlic.
     
  14. Mar 6, 2019 #14

    riba

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    McGee also touches on this in 'on Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen', recommending to eat apple after a garlic heavy meal
     
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  15. Mar 7, 2019 #15

    Nikabrik

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    Well, I can definitely confirm that apple draws out the garlic flavor.

    I agree, oil seems to help; I have wondered about getting smells out, and I'm curious to try the lemon idea.

    I did have one case where I oiled a stinky board, then washed it; I feel like the aromatics were oil-soluble, and got lifted out during the process. I don't know yet how executive that it's comparitively, but it'd be interesting to test.
     

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