Ideal grit for steak knives

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KOA

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Recently decided to upgrade my steak knives. Decided on Perceval 9.47 and couldn’t be happier. The weight and balance is perfect, not to mention a luxurious fit & finish. However, I’m lost on the best way to sharpen them. They seam to cut steak like a laser but don’t go through paper towel or printer paper at all. I suppose I’m confused how they cut protein so well but wouldn’t pass my normal sharpening test (paper/paper towel). Which leads me to my question. How should I sharpen these and what test could I use to see if I did a good job? Other than Cooking a ribeye to see how they perform😂
B1BBA7D1-7DF4-4574-8A5A-D2E9A89C2963.jpeg
 
How should I sharpen these and what test could I use to see if I did a good job? Other than Cooking a ribeye to see how they perform😂
View attachment 206897
New York. Picanha. Porterhouse. Etc.


Seriously though, I'd sharpen them on something about 500-1k grit.
 
I have a set of cheap steak knives that came in a block set. They’re so thin they basically cut solely based on geometry. Doesn’t really matter that they have no edge to speak of, they still cut steak reasonably well. I’ve sharpened them a few times but eventually decided, meh why bother as long as they’re getting the job done. Your knives might be similarly thin.
 
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I'd probably use something like a soft Ark. You want a bit of tooth, but don't want to refine the edge too much, since it is going to be contacting porcelain plates every time you cut.
 
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@parbaked do you have any inputs here?

Ever since you have turned me on onto these I have biding my time to let my wife know we need 4 in the olive wood flavor
 
I'd say the bigger point is that you want to use a pretty high angle. As a few people have said steak knives rely a lot on their geometry to cut things so the sharpness of the edge is of less concern. A high angle will give the edge more strength to deal with rolling and the following fatigue chipping.
 
I'd say the bigger point is that you want to use a pretty high angle. As a few people have said steak knives rely a lot on their geometry to cut things so the sharpness of the edge is of less concern. A high angle will give the edge more strength to deal with rolling and the following fatigue chipping.
I agree here! I sharpen a ton of steak knives and have noticed that even new ones have a much steeper angle, somewhere in the 30-40 degree range. Always adjust your sharpening for the task the knife is used for.
 
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I agree here! I sharpen a ton of steak knives and have noticed that even new ones have a much steeper angle, somewhere in the 30-40 degree range. Always adjust your sharpening for the task the knife is used for.
I’m pleasantly surprised by how resilient their cutting ability is despite use on porcelain plates. Makes sense that a high angle and natural geometry of the knife play a major part in their ability. I only have a shapton 400, 1k and chosera 3k. I supposed I’ll use the 1k.
 
Recently decided to upgrade my steak knives. Decided on Perceval 9.47 and couldn’t be happier. The weight and balance is perfect, not to mention a luxurious fit & finish. However, I’m lost on the best way to sharpen them. They seam to cut steak like a laser but don’t go through paper towel or printer paper at all. I suppose I’m confused how they cut protein so well but wouldn’t pass my normal sharpening test (paper/paper towel). Which leads me to my question. How should I sharpen these and what test could I use to see if I did a good job? Other than Cooking a ribeye to see how they perform😂
View attachment 206897
I sharpen steak knives including the Perceval 9.47 I use a Naniwa 400 I put a micro bevel on the edge to finish which help the edge last I check them by slicing through kitchen tissue paper.
 
I sharpen steak knives including the Perceval 9.47 I use a Naniwa 400 I put a micro bevel on the edge to finish which help the edge last I check them by slicing through kitchen tissue paper.
With microbevel you mean a tiny (few degrees) one or a japanese style major one?
 
Naniwa Pro 2k (+/— JIS 3k) with carbons, coarser than usual. What kind of steel are those Perceval, @KOA ?
If it is one of the fine grained Sandviks French makers seem to like, there's no problem in giving it a somewhat polished edge. With the standard German stainless, Krupp's 4116, though, it makes no sense and you better keep it under 1k.
 
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Naniwa Pro 2k (+/— JIS 3k) with carbons, coarser than usual. What kind of steel are those Perceval, @KOA ?
If it is one of the fine grained Sandviks French makers seem to like, there's no problem in giving it a somewhat polished edge. With the standard German stainless, Krupp's 4116, though, it makes no sense and you better keep it under 1k.
Sandvik 14C28N
 
Nice knives. I have some old Chicago cutlery steak knives from back when they were made in the USA. I sharpen at 20 degrees each side and sharpen about 1 time a year. They will get abused. I can bring them back fast using my Worksharp Ken Onion.
 
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I haven’t had to sharpened mine.
They are a joy to use on cooked protein.
Never tried to cut paper towels.

My input is to buy some…
I curse this thread, because it made me buy a set of these. I'd been telling myself I was perfectly happy with my $9 Victorinox steak knives, and then...

Free tip: they were MUCH cheaper ordered from France on eBay than from any US dealer I found.
 
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I curse this thread, because it made me buy a set of these. I'd been telling myself I was perfectly happy with my $9 Victorinox steak knives, and then...

Free tip: they were MUCH cheaper ordered from France on eBay than from any US dealer I found.
These are crazy satisfying to use. One of my favorite purchases.
 
Dining out, I know the custom is for every guest to get their own hunk-of-cow.

At home, serving family style, is there more of a tendency to cut on the board and distribute slices?

I’m wondering if steak knives become optional in the latter scenario. Partly to square with the whole Chinese tradition of keeping knives off the table, and cutting to bite-sized before plating.

AADBEC3E-86A9-47A0-A24F-A4C93B66072C.jpeg
 
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Dining out, I know the custom is for every guest to get their own hunk-of-cow.

At home, serving family style, is there more of a tendency to cut on the board and distribute slices?

I’m wondering if steak knives become optional in the latter scenario.

View attachment 207341
I actually always serve my steak in this manner. Knives are definitely preferred by myself and my guests.
Where can I find that angle gadget that you have. I’d be curious to what the factory edge is on these. No need to sharpen after months of (weekly) use.
 
Dining out, I know the custom is for every guest to get their own hunk-of-cow.

At home, serving family style, is there more of a tendency to cut on the board and distribute slices?

I’m wondering if steak knives become optional in the latter scenario. Partly to square with the whole Chinese tradition of keeping knives off the table, and cutting to bite-sized before plating.

View attachment 207341

I had to cut meat for my kids when they were little and they could not do it. Now my grandkids. Once they get big enough, they cut their own meat. I think that is the way it is done in Texas. It was done for me when I was little, so I passed it on.
 
Dining out, I know the custom is for every guest to get their own hunk-of-cow.

At home, serving family style, is there more of a tendency to cut on the board and distribute slices?

I’m wondering if steak knives become optional in the latter scenario. Partly to square with the whole Chinese tradition of keeping knives off the table, and cutting to bite-sized before plating.

View attachment 207341
Yes if you pre-slice it largely becomes irrelevant what knife you give people.
Another solution to the 'using good knives on ceramic plates' problem is to get some wooden plates. Or just eat off the cutting board...
 
Where can I find that angle gadget that you have. I’d be curious to what the factory edge is on these.
A factory edge should rarely be the object of special veneration. I check it to make sure I'm not overlooking a micro-bevel when giving a knife a sharpening prior to its first use. A piece of leather or cardboard is all you need. Move the the flat knife edge leading while little by little lifting the spine. When it starts biting you know the sharpening angle: it's just slightly lower than when it bites.
 
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