Recommendation - Bread Mixer

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TheNewMexican

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Well.... after 14 years got sick of the toxic poop and separated from my wife. As a result, I am now happily living in an apartment and slowly getting my life back. As I rebuild a lifestyle for myself, I look at some of the cool stuff I left behind such as the verona mixer.

I would like recommendations on a more budget friendly bread mixer for sourdough. Any thoughts? Appreciate it.......

BTW.... I kept all the kitchen knives. She doesn't know any better anyway ;)
 
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You may already be familiar with it but I suggest you check out The Fresh Loaf which is sort of the KKF of bread baking fanatics. Many of their recommendations (Fanag and Haussler) are far from budget friendly. The Ankarsrum (aka Verona) and the Bosch are both in the $450 - $700 range which is still expensive but comparatively affordable. Sometimes used Hobarts show up crazy cheap on Craigslist, Facebook Marketplace, NextDoor, etc. and that can be the cheapest option. I know someone who scored a working used 20 qt for $50, something of a minor miracle. Parts and instructions to rebuild them are available. I know nothing about the Kenwoods. The modern KitchenAids are not really built for heavy doughs but are the most widely available option and more general purpose, e.g. cakes and pastries, than the dedicated bread mixers.
Edit: You might want to check out Pleasant Hill Grain who carry everything from $3K mixers down to around $200 (the small Bosch, WonderMix, and Nutrimill). I've heard that the little Bosch isn't too bad despite the rather light construction.
 
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We've had one of these for about five years now: Ankarsrum Mixer
We make between 2 and 6, 2lb loaves per week with it. Don't bother with a Kitchenaid. Even the larger consumer/"pro" ones are crap for making bread. They are, however, much better for cakes (but then you're better off hand mixing).
 

Michi

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I recently upgraded my Kenwood mixer to the XL Titanium version. It has a 1700 W motor (that's 2.28 horsepower). What I like best (beside the large bowl volume) is the spiral dough hook. No more dough that endlessly climbs up the hook, and it is strong enough for even low-hydration dough.
 
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simona

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Use no knead recipes with long rise times. You can cheat a little by doing a few folds and a tiny bit of kneading.
400g flour, at least 13% protein, 300g water, cold, 8g salt, 4g yeast (100g active sour dough). Mix together until all ingredients are wet, cover, leave at room temp for 10-18 hours. If you want a fine crumb, fold the dough two or three times after 4 hours or so; if you want long open crumb, don't. Turn out, fold it over itself until it 'stands' on it's own, leave to rise in a floured t towel, bake in a dutch oven; put the dutch oven into an oven and get it roasting hot at 230 C, pop in the dough: bake with lid on @ 230 for 30 minutes, remove lid, bake @230 for 10-15 mins until the colour is as you like it. Check out Jim Lahey
Works for rolls, focaccia, pizza, full-corn, half corn, whatever. Enjoy.
IMG_3164.JPG
 

Lucretia

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I killed...let's see, 3 kitchen aid mixers (1 jumped off counter, one got really loud and started dumping black powder in the dough, and one stripped its gears operating well within tolerances) making dough. I bought an Ankarsum back when they were Electrolux (5 years ago.) Same mixer, different name (and the price was lower then!) Got it from Pleasant Hill Grain. LOVE this mixer for making bread. It's relatively quiet, you can make a bunch at a time and freeze the dough to make later, you have plenty of access to the bowl since the drive motor is underneath. If you're thinking about one, there are a lot of videos out there on how to use them-the bowl moves, the blending elements are (somewhat) fixed. America's Test Kitchen didn't like them because they couldn't figure out how to use them (waaah!) but then again, they didn't like a toaster because they couldn't figure out how to put bagels in cut side out rather than cut side in.
 

sumis

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can't go wrong with ankarsrum or big kenwwod.
if i was only kneading/baking i'd probably go ankarsum.
attachment wise the kenwood has some actually working and useful add-ons.

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