Blank blades WIP Thread.

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Sounds very interesting. 240-245x53-55 is are the right dimensions :p thick enough in the pinch area for spine and choil to be comfortable for long use and slightly blade heavy balance when in pinch:LOL:

Sounds like the stock is going to come in around 54mm tall. So is going to be shorter than that on the finished blade.
 
How much height/width do you usually loose? Do you know how thick the stock is?

It really sounds like a very interesting steel.
The thickest stock they had was 4.5mm. So thats what i got. Had to check what they had really quick.

I heard the height is a bit oversized which is good. Im hoping the thickness will be a bit too.

But, its hard to say the exact ammount i loose. Really depends. I think the m4 was 63 in height. But i believe i ground down to around 60mm just to take some the extra off, and then by the end they were around 59ish. I'd have to see what those were.

But even if i try my best. Some height will get lost. Just by nature of me grinding to zero, then testing the performance, thinning where it needs to be thinned, polishing. Etc.

And getting the taper in, some thickness gets lost at the spine during that. And same deal there also. Through the coarse of polishing some more thickness is lost.

But hopefully can manage to keep the spine thickness at the handle above 4mm at the very least, if i got 5mm to work with, that would be perfect
 
Finally arrived.
IMG_20231204_120826960.jpg


So it is taller than 50mm, around 53.2-53.5.

The thickness is 4.3mm, rather than 4.5mm though.

Should still make some nice blades imo.

Gonna probably start running ht coupons soon. I trying to decide if i should wait for the magnacut, and aeb-l i have coming and run ht coupons all together, but i think i can just do these first, then those. And make things easier on myself.
 
Finally arrived.
View attachment 286118

So it is taller than 50mm, around 53.2-53.5.

The thickness is 4.3mm, rather than 4.5mm though.

Should still make some nice blades imo.

Gonna probably start running ht coupons soon. I trying to decide if i should wait for the magnacut, and aeb-l i have coming and run ht coupons all together, but i think i can just do these first, then those. And make things easier on myself.
Really curious about this steel. If you can manage to not loose too much height 240-245x51-52 can still be great especially in a steel like this since I wouldn’t expect anyone to loose too much height over time given the steel. Neck width/height can also make the knife feel taller or not depending on how tall it is compared to the blade height. It should also be possible to have slight forward balance in pinch even though wider blade makes this easier. What grind are you thinking with this, convex or more of a wide bevel?
 
Really curious about this steel. If you can manage to not loose too much height 240-245x51-52 can still be great especially in a steel like this since I wouldn’t expect anyone to loose too much height over time given the steel. Neck width/height can also make the knife feel taller or not depending on how tall it is compared to the blade height. It should also be possible to have slight forward balance in pinch even though wider blade makes this easier. What grind are you thinking with this, convex or more of a wide bevel?
Not sure yet really on the kind of grind.

Im sure i can keep it 52 or above.

Tbh, i think 49-50mm blade height is fine, especially with midweight, or laser type grinds. Knuckle clearance really doesnt have anything to do with heel height, so that part doesn't matter much imo. The only real benefit i see to a taller heel, is getting something heavier, and thicker to cut like its thinner at the spine. But still have the weight behind it.
 
Screenshot_20231204-165719.png


It kind of reminds me of vanadis 8, and k390, but it seems it maybe have a high mc type carbide volume than those though.

I highly recommend anyone here that is interested in steel metallurgy in knives subscribe to @Troopah_Knives on patreon. I think he might be doing an article on it at some point in the future there.

But he also has a great back catalog of articles on various things already. I should really sit down and read. Haven't had a chance yet.
 
Not sure yet really on the kind of grind.

Im sure i can keep it 52 or above.

Tbh, i think 49-50mm blade height is fine, especially with midweight, or laser type grinds. Knuckle clearance really doesnt have anything to do with heel height, so that part doesn't matter much imo. The only real benefit i see to a taller heel, is getting something heavier, and thicker to cut like its thinner at the spine. But still have the weight behind it.
Yes, I agree knuckle clearance is not the main reason to go higher than 49-50. Like you say it is mostly to have the real estate to create thin, acute edges with thicker spine to aid with cutting and to some degree food release. Also makes it easier to have forward balance, but that too can be dealt with even with shorter heels. Look at Masamoto KS for example, many people love the design and those blades are long and relatively narrow at 48-49 in most cases. Done correctly can definitely work and make a great knife. Current fashion is tall blades though, too tall in my opinion.
 
Decided to buy more of this asp-2053 steel.

Idk how long I will still be able to find it. So i wanted to stock up a bit on it while i can. I would have bought more than i did if i had enough $.

But anyway. This steel seems to really good and i want to continue using it in the future.
 
Do you think people would be willing to pay the extra money, for included sayas with the knives?

If i do them, theyre going to be made of something to match the handle material ideally. So the material costs could be a bit higher than like a ho wood saya. And obviously its going to be more time and labor to make them, than not making them.

But as an example, if i had done sayas with this cpm m4 gyuto drop. The saya would have also been natural linen micarta like the handle. But the price would have likely been $100-200 higher depending on a few things.

Idk. Trying to decide.
 
Do you think people would be willing to pay the extra money, for included sayas with the knives?

If i do them, theyre going to be made of something to match the handle material ideally. So the material costs could be a bit higher than like a ho wood saya. And obviously its going to be more time and labor to make them, than not making them.

But as an example, if i had done sayas with this cpm m4 gyuto drop. The saya would have also been natural linen micarta like the handle. But the price would have likely been $100-200 higher depending on a few things.

Idk. Trying to decide.
For me, not at all. I'd much rather have the option to buy a Saya separately and frankly, I've never felt the need to buy one. The knife lives on the mag rack or in the box and the extra $100+ could very well be the difference in purchasing a knife or not.
 
For me, not at all. I'd much rather have the option to buy a Saya separately and frankly, I've never felt the need to buy one. The knife lives on the mag rack or in the box and the extra $100+ could very well be the difference in purchasing a knife or not.
Yeah. Thats kind of the feeling i had about it. As much as i would like to do them, and think it would be very visually pleasing. I dont think people will want to pay enough for it to be worth it for me to do.
 
Yeah. Thats kind of the feeling i had about it. As much as i would like to do them, and think it would be very visually pleasing. I dont think people will want to pay enough for it to be worth it for me to do.
You could give buyers an option once they buy a knife if this is something you are interested in making. I wouldn’t make it a requirement as part of a package, but once someone commited to buy a knife you could tell them how long it would take and the price. Personally, I’d rather you concentrated on making cool knives out of very interesting steels. You should do what interests you though.
 
You could give buyers an option once they buy a knife if this is something you are interested in making. I wouldn’t make it a requirement as part of a package, but once someone commited to buy a knife you could tell them how long it would take and the price. Personally, I’d rather you concentrated on making cool knives out of very interesting steels. You should do what interests you though.
I think i would want it be be ready to go once the knife is for sale.

Rather than tacked on extra work at the end.

I guess i wont bother with sayas unless someone asks in a custom or something.
 
asp-2053 looks really good, how’s the toughness compare to 10v or k390 at similar hardness?
I don't have a definitive answer myself currently.

Waiting to see what troopah puts out on his patreon article.

From what he has said. It sound promising.

So one thing, talking to him. He has made the comparison to maxamet a few times. And looking at them side by side (also 10v). I can kinda see why. While asp-2053 isnt exactly a high speed steel. Its like somewhere between a high speed steel, and cold work tool steel composition wise.
Screenshot_20231209-153146.png


Also. It looks like asp-2053 has the highest carbon of all of them.

Idk if the carbon balance is higher or not. But its interesting still.

Makes sense why the mc type carbide volume is still the same as 10v if not a tiny bit higher, even though the vanadium is a bit lower.
 
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Here is a comment from Larrin on his website:
“What I don’t like about Rex45/Hap40 is the cobalt addition which reduces its toughness. The non-cobalt M3:2 has better toughness at equivalent hardness and wear resistance.”

Hap40 is 8% Co and a HSS. So asp-2053 not being HSS is probably a good thing.
 
Here is a comment from Larrin on his website:
“What I don’t like about Rex45/Hap40 is the cobalt addition which reduces its toughness. The non-cobalt M3:2 has better toughness at equivalent hardness and wear resistance.”

Hap40 is 8% Co and a HSS. So asp-2053 not being HSS is probably a good thing.
I wouldn't say it not being a hss is a good or bad thing. Just it not having a significant cobalt addition is a good thing.

Since the cobalt addition isn't necessary to make a hss.
 
So far this has been the best way I've found for grinding these super wear resistant steels.

IMG_20231210_140705869.jpg


What I've found works best. Is i start by cutting in some initial beveks, get those fairly even. Grind until right around the layout line i put in the middle of the edge.

After that. The next step is to start doing the taper. Which is what you can see in this pic. Grinding in (fairly even) bevels before does a couple things.

It helps me keep the area of contact with the belt at any given time lower, which means the smaller contact area has a higher ammount of force which is important to keep belts cutting these steels efficiently.

But also, it gives me an extra way to visualize the taper I'm grinding in.

But anyway. Next step is to go back and grind the bevels at the changing angle needed to have a straight shinogi on a distal tapered blade. Then switch to 60 grit to even everything out. Then i start moving up grits and round over the shinogi.
 
I love saya. Buy them whenever I can
Same here, if available i do typically get for a few extra as I do typically like to bring my own tools for cookouts.

the micarta feel's very nice too if it was the choice for a saya here... but understand that demand for this will vary and might be hard to do outside customs.
 
So far this has been the best way I've found for grinding these super wear resistant steels.

View attachment 287107

What I've found works best. Is i start by cutting in some initial beveks, get those fairly even. Grind until right around the layout line i put in the middle of the edge.

After that. The next step is to start doing the taper. Which is what you can see in this pic. Grinding in (fairly even) bevels before does a couple things.

It helps me keep the area of contact with the belt at any given time lower, which means the smaller contact area has a higher ammount of force which is important to keep belts cutting these steels efficiently.

But also, it gives me an extra way to visualize the taper I'm grinding in.

But anyway. Next step is to go back and grind the bevels at the changing angle needed to have a straight shinogi on a distal tapered blade. Then switch to 60 grit to even everything out. Then i start moving up grits and round over the shinogi.
That's how I make it too. You do most of the whole work before heat treatment?
 
Decided to go back to my more midweight super tapered grinds.
IMG_20231211_010619082.jpg


Coming along..still needs work. But theyre getting there.

The balance point gets pushed towards the pinch grip more with a more extreme taper. But i think the cutting performance is more than worth it.

Also having the balance point right there is kinda nice imo. You get a lot of control.
 
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