I need advice choosing between Demeyere frying pans

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foodnoobie

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I want to make the switch to all stainless steel pans without a coating and even though i'm on a budget, i figured i can buy 1 or 2 pans first. And cook with only just that on my gas stove.
My first pan that i want is a frying pan.I live by myself and cook only for myself. And i never make big portions. So i figured the 8 inch is too small, 12 inch is too big for just myself, so i think the 10 inch is the best size. But feel free to correct me on this.

My question is: Should i get the Demeyere 10 inch frying pan Atlantis/Proline 7, Silver 7, or Multiline 7?

The difference on the website says between proline and silver, that the silver is 4,7 cm higher? This might be an error on their website.
The Silver weight is 1.24kg
The Multiline7 weight is: 1,31kg
The Proline7 weight is: 1.75kg
What is interesting is that the Multiline is advertised specifically for its lighter weight, yet the Silver is even lighter than that.

I don't know if 1.75kg is heavy to use on a daily basis for tossing etc, or if i should go with the lighter multiline/silver series. The multiline is 40 euros cheaper, the proline and silver are the same price. I don't mind paying 40 extra if it's worth it in the long run.

Final question: I want to buy a stainless steel pan to cook rice in, because my old rice cooker broke down. I always only cook 100-150 grams of rice at a time.
The other uses for the pan would be to boil water, cook vegetables and sometimes 100 grams of pasta.

Demeyere customer support recommended me the conical saute pan.
But on the internet everyone recommends me the saucier pan, which is also conical in shape.
Are these the same pans? Because when i select a smaller size, it changes from conic saute pan to saucier.
And should i get a 1.5 quart, 2 quart or 2.6 quart for a single person?

Hope you guys can steer me into the right direction. Thank you very much!
 
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I have the demeyere pro line in both 24 and 28 cm sizes. They’re great heavy duty pans, but they’re heavy. If you’re looking for a replacement for cast iron, go for it. If you want something you can toss food around in, one of the lighter ones may be easier to use unless you’re pretty strong in your wrists

I’d think a 1.5 q/l pan is fine for rice for one. 2.5 l is probably better for pasta. Something less expensive than demeyere is probably fine for boiling pasta.

I have a 2.7 l, 20 cm fissler that’s not cheap, but I use it for both pasta and as a small sauté pan. Love that pan, most versatile thing in my kitchen but it’s too big for rice. (sorry, can’t find an eu link)

https://www.fissler.com/us/p/original-profi-collection-sauce-pan-with-metal-lids-2019/[/URL
 
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For what it's worth, I have a Demeyere 5-Plus 28cm pan that I use almost every day. Has a very nice rounded shape (compared with the more splayed edges of an All-Clad) which works well for pasta and tossing foods in general.
 
i wouldn't waste money on demeyere for cooking pasta …

i have skillets in proline, mutiline and industry (5-ply). the big proline is just too unwieldy and only makes sense if you're cooking only cooking steaks, and a lot of them. the others are great. if more weight, layers and thickness makes you sleep better, get the one the makes you feel best. there's not a bad choice to be made here.

.
 
Just in case you didn't see my link in the other thread, I did a write-up on Demeyere frying pans a while ago I recommend you read what I wrote there as I'm just picking out some highlights in this post:
https://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/...proline-multiline-industry-ecoline-etc.63690/
Since you're in the Netherlands, ignore any recommendations for Made-In or All-Clad; those might be a good deal in the US but they're quite expensive in Europe, so you're not saving any money there.

Other than that my experiences aline with sumi. For boiling water basically any metal bucket or bucket-shaped vessel will work, especially when cooking on gas. You're not really going to notice a difference using a 15 euro Ikea pan vs a 200 euro Demeyere Atlantis pot. I'd save my money there.

For frying pans... I have proline 24, proline 28, multiline 24, multiline 28 and multiline 32. The multiline 28 sees by far the most use in my kitchen.
The proline is 'better' for frying meats (thicker heavier pan means better heat retention which is great when searing meat) but that's really all it's better at, and the thinner multilines still do meat great. If I could only have 1 it would always be a multiline. It's just a lot easier to toss food with, and works a lot quicker.
So which pan is best depends a lot on what you're going to use it for, and how many pans you're going to buy. If only 1 my preference would be the 28 multiline. If more than 1 you can consider either doing different sizes, or picking pans from different lines, but it depends a lot on how you cook.

Sizing is a bit personal preference, but I pretty much always use the 28s. Even my 32 sees more use than my two 24s combined. If I ever buy another one it would simply be another multiline 28 so that I have two of them.

The silver is supposed to be very similar to the proline series, mostly aesthethical differences. My guess is they have a typo at the specs for the 24 cm model; for the 28 model silver and proline have similar weight.

To my knowledge conical saute pan and conical saucier are just different names for the same thing. IMO these kind of pans are some of the most useful in the kitchen, especially the larger ones, because you can use them for just about anything. Especially great for sauce work, doing reductions, and anything with liquids where you actually care about having a homogenous temperature inside the pot.
However, they're complete overkill for boiling pasta, and probably for rice too. They'll do it great, but it's more something you do 'because you already have the pans for other things'. They're not cheap though. It's also very hard to find good 'cheaper alternatives' to these since there aren't that many manufacturers selling proper stainless clad sauciers.
 
Just in case you didn't see my link in the other thread, I did a write-up on Demeyere frying pans a while ago I recommend you read what I wrote there as I'm just picking out some highlights in this post:
https://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/...proline-multiline-industry-ecoline-etc.63690/
Since you're in the Netherlands, ignore any recommendations for Made-In or All-Clad; those might be a good deal in the US but they're quite expensive in Europe, so you're not saving any money there.

Other than that my experiences aline with sumi. For boiling water basically any metal bucket or bucket-shaped vessel will work, especially when cooking on gas. You're not really going to notice a difference using a 15 euro Ikea pan vs a 200 euro Demeyere Atlantis pot. I'd save my money there.

For frying pans... I have proline 24, proline 28, multiline 24, multiline 28 and multiline 32. The multiline 28 sees by far the most use in my kitchen.
The proline is 'better' for frying meats (thicker heavier pan means better heat retention which is great when searing meat) but that's really all it's better at, and the thinner multilines still do meat great. If I could only have 1 it would always be a multiline. It's just a lot easier to toss food with, and works a lot quicker.
So which pan is best depends a lot on what you're going to use it for, and how many pans you're going to buy. If only 1 my preference would be the 28 multiline. If more than 1 you can consider either doing different sizes, or picking pans from different lines, but it depends a lot on how you cook.

Sizing is a bit personal preference, but I pretty much always use the 28s. Even my 32 sees more use than my two 24s combined. If I ever buy another one it would simply be another multiline 28 so that I have two of them.

The silver is supposed to be very similar to the proline series, mostly aesthethical differences. My guess is they have a typo at the specs for the 24 cm model; for the 28 model silver and proline have similar weight.

To my knowledge conical saute pan and conical saucier are just different names for the same thing. IMO these kind of pans are some of the most useful in the kitchen, especially the larger ones, because you can use them for just about anything. Especially great for sauce work, doing reductions, and anything with liquids where you actually care about having a homogenous temperature inside the pot.
However, they're complete overkill for boiling pasta, and probably for rice too. They'll do it great, but it's more something you do 'because you already have the pans for other things'. They're not cheap though. It's also very hard to find good 'cheaper alternatives' to these since there aren't that many manufacturers selling proper stainless clad sauciers.
Amazing reply! Yes i read your thread entirely, it was the reason how i found this site. It was the best information i could find online.

I definitely prefer the weight of the multiline 28, however for how many people do you cook with it?
Because i am only a single person and i always cook either 150 grams of meat/chickenbreast (which is 1 piece). And sometimes i make some vegetables. So my worry was that the 28 inch is simply excessively big. I'm never cooking for company or make meal prep for several days.

At first i thought i'd order the 24 proline and instead of tossing the vegetables, i'd just stir them to work around the weight issue. But perhaps the multiline is better. I am curious if the difference is noticeable between both pans in terms of cooking ability. Really appreciate the time and effort you put into your messages! Thank you.
 
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I have the demeyere pro line in both 24 and 28 cm sizes. They’re great heavy duty pans, but they’re heavy. If you’re looking for a replacement for cast iron, go for it. If you want something you can toss food around in, one of the lighter ones may be easier to use unless you’re pretty strong in your wrists

I’d think a 1.5 q/l pan is fine for rice for one. 2.5 l is probably better for pasta. Something less expensive than demeyere is probably fine for boiling pasta.

I have a 2.7 l, 20 cm fissler that’s not cheap, but I use it for both pasta and as a small sauté pan. Love that pan, most versatile thing in my kitchen but it’s too big for rice. (sorry, can’t find an eu link)

https://www.fissler.com/us/p/original-profi-collection-sauce-pan-with-metal-lids-2019/[/URL

Do you think the 1.5q/l is big enough for 100 grams of pasta? Some people told me the 2q/l is more versatile, but i rather buy a pan that is big enough just for what i need and not bigger. But now i'm a bit worried 100 grams of pasta is too much for the 1.5q/l size? I also worry that cooking 100 grams of rice in a 2l/q pan might be a bit difficult because the pan might be too big for that? What is your opinion? I eat rice almost every day and pasta only once a month, but ideally i'd still like a pan that could cook both.

For what it's worth, I have a Demeyere 5-Plus 28cm pan that I use almost every day. Has a very nice rounded shape (compared with the more splayed edges of an All-Clad) which works well for pasta and tossing foods in general.

Do you cook for multiple people or just for yourself? Because i live alone so i only usually cook a 150 gram steak or chickenbreast, and some vegetables. I never make big portions, so that's why i'm not leaning towards the 28cm, even though the 28cm is only $10 more expensive.

i wouldn't waste money on demeyere for cooking pasta …

i have skillets in proline, mutiline and industry (5-ply). the big proline is just too unwieldy and only makes sense if you're cooking only cooking steaks, and a lot of them. the others are great. if more weight, layers and thickness makes you sleep better, get the one the makes you feel best. there's not a bad choice to be made here.
Do you think the proline cooks a lot better for steaks and veggies or is it pretty much the same as the multiline? I thought instead of tossing the vegetables, i can just stir it around as a workaround. But perhaps the weight of the 24 inch proline is not ideal. I'm conflicted on this.

PS: Sorry for the double post. I was not able to edit my first message to add the mutli quotes in it and i didn't see how to multi quote until after my first post.
 
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Do you think the proline cooks a lot better for steaks and veggies or is it pretty much the same as the multiline? I thought instead of tossing the vegetables, i can just stir it around as a workaround. But perhaps the weight of the 24 inch proline is not ideal. I'm conflicted on this.

neither pan will cook a steak, you will ;)

both will cook a steak just as well. the less heavy will be easier to handle and more versatile.

.
 
neither pan will cook a steak, you will ;)

both will cook a steak just as well. the less heavy will be easier to handle and more versatile.
Thanks, my cast iron grill pan is very heavy and i hate using it for that reason. The only thing is that i eat meat daily, so of course i'd like a pan that cooks the meat well. But if it's proline and multiline are equal in that department, then the lighter version is definitely the choice to go with. Thank you.
I know this is an answer to a different question than the one you asked, but if you’re eating rice every day, perhaps one of these cuties could be worth considering.

https://yum-asia.com/eu/product-category/rice-cookers/1-4-cup-capacity/
Are the rice bowls made of stainless steel as well? Because that was my main concern with rice cookers. That they come with ceramics or anti stick coating or other material that might not be safe. I got rid of all my teflon pans as well. Great suggestion! Thank you for thinking for a solution with me.
 
In the 28 cm I usually cook for 1 or 2, but sometimes for more... it's basically the most common frying pan size (and very similar to 28 / 30 cm models of other brands in volume, De Meyere runs a bit on the large side).

I have to admit that even when I cook for myself I rarely grab the 24s, but this could just be personal preference, and maybe my portions are just large. ;) Generally I like having the extra frying surface, and while it's not that problematic to fry a smaller quantity in a larger pan, it is problematic to fry larger quantities in a smaller pan. So if you're doing any sauteing of vegetables, or pancakes or whatever the 28 quickly becomes the ideal option IMO. 32 only starts making sense if you're doing larger volumes (like veggies for 4, or multiple day dishes).

The difference between proline and multiline in searing meat isn't dramatic. It's most noticable if you're really filling up the pans or doing larger pieces, as that'll suck a lot more heat out of the pan. If you're doing single person portions I don't think it'll really bring much benefit. For anything other than meat the proline can actually be a downgrade, since it's noticably heavier and most of all slower (heats up a lot slower, cools down slower). If I were to do it all over again I'm not sure I'd buy 2 prolines; I might get the 28, but not the 24 alongside it.
It might help if you can find a physical store nearby so you can compare the sizes and weights to see and feel for yourself.

My standard ratio for pasta is 1 liiter of water / 10 grams of salt per 100 grams of pasta (though it's certainly viable to cook in less water)... but you have to take into account that you'll always want some spare volume to avoid spilling and overflows, and you also need to take the actual pasta into account. Personally I'd lean towards the 2 liter / 20 cm model... but as you probably noticed by now I always gravitate towards larger (I actually have 2x 24 cm 3L sauciers that are my most-used non-frying pans). Larger diameter also makes it a bit more stable and a bit more versatile.
 
So short summary, for me proline only realy offers benefits when searing meats and even then mostly when doing bigger or multiple pieces. Anything else the multiline tends to do just as well or better.
I'd recommend strongly to expand the collection piece by piece. That way you can get a feel for whether a certain size works, whether you need something larger, or smaller, or need anything more at all. Arguably my biggest mistake was buying them all in one bunch.
There's no sensible bundle or set deals that are really worth getting anyway, so financially it makes virtually no difference apart from potentially a bit more shipping cost.
 
So short summary, for me proline only realy offers benefits when searing meats and even then mostly when doing bigger or multiple pieces. Anything else the multiline tends to do just as well or better.
I'd recommend strongly to expand the collection piece by piece. That way you can get a feel for whether a certain size works, whether you need something larger, or smaller, or need anything more at all. Arguably my biggest mistake was buying them all in one bunch.
There's no sensible bundle or set deals that are really worth getting anyway, so financially it makes virtually no difference apart from potentially a bit more shipping cost.
Amazing reply. I just re-read your other thread again as well.
It's complicated to choose to be honest because without trying it, you can't ever truly know. And of course i can't try it, cook something and then return it because then it will be used and voids the return policy. And no pan fits all so it's a tough decision.

Searing meat and vegetables is basically all i do in the frying pan, and i always cook 150 grams of meat at most. Maybe 300 gram of chicken breast if i cook to make chicken sandwiches for a few days. So if the multiline does that equally well but is comfortable lighter, then that's definitely the best choice.

I will try to see if a local store sells it in the store so i can get a feel for the weight.
Otherwise i'll just have to fill my current frying pan with water until the weight is equal.
Really appreciate the time and experience you put into your replies! Thank you very much,
 
Re rice, if you are making brown rice, cooking it using the pasta method is far healthier, and the leftover rice doesn’t dry out as quickly.

So a larger sauce pan is more versatile.
This is the first time i've ever heard of this method. It sounds interesting! I'm going to try cooking rice today in one of my cheap sauce pan and compare it with the standard method.

One recipe said that once the rice is el dente, you drain the water and let the rice simmer on the lowest heat after you add some oil or butter. I'm someone who is always on a diet so i count my calories. Therefore the less oil/butter, the better and i prefer not to use it for my rice.

Will this method not burn the rice without the oil or butter since it will just be the rice sitting on the bottom of a pan on the lowest of heat?

Also could you tell me why the pasta method is healthier?

Thanks for the advice!

PS: Is this for brown rice only or also for white rice? I eat white rice 99.9% of the time.
 
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Do you think the 1.5q/l is big enough for 100 grams of pasta? Some people told me the 2q/l is more versatile, but i rather buy a pan that is big enough just for what i need and not bigger. But now i'm a bit worried 100 grams of pasta is too much for the 1.5q/l size? I also worry that cooking 100 grams of rice in a 2l/q pan might be a bit difficult because the pan might be too big for that? What is your opinion? I eat rice almost every day and pasta only once a month, but ideally i'd still like a pan that could cook both.



Do you cook for multiple people or just for yourself? Because i live alone so i only usually cook a 150 gram steak or chickenbreast, and some vegetables. I never make big portions, so that's why i'm not leaning towards the 28cm, even though the 28cm is only $10 more expensive.


Do you think the proline cooks a lot better for steaks and veggies or is it pretty much the same as the multiline? I thought instead of tossing the vegetables, i can just stir it around as a workaround. But perhaps the weight of the 24 inch proline is not ideal. I'm conflicted on this.

PS: Sorry for the double post. I was not able to edit my first message to add the mutli quotes in it and i didn't see how to multi quote until after my first post.
For pasta, I think a bigger pan is always better. Keep in mind that traditionally pasta is tossed/sauteed in aluminum pans that are at least 32 cm. The 28 is perfect for one or two portions.
 
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