Monosteel western handle Gyuto discussion thread

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Did some bevel sharpening on sg500, gesshin 2k and 6k, feels around the same neighborhood with Ginga white 2 or Togiharu VC, hard but not that glassy, great knife. Tho my hand feel is no way accurate and subjects to personal bias
 
Sometimes when you make a website "product" it's easier to copy an existing one and change images and details, sometimes people forget to change everything (note to self: check website listings.

And sometimes the suppliers can't tell you everything about a knife (often I'll have to order off a small low res pic and a spreadsheet with little information about anything🤨)

I think 🤔 Daisuke Kawamura of Sakai Kikumori told me they were HRC 58-60 when he came to see me this year, but don't quote me.
 
I got interested in a couple of monosteel gyutos at YuiSenri ALL "Made in Japan Knives" from Sakai/Osaka

Hisashige High Carbon​

Sakai Kikumori Hi-Carbon​

Kenkikusui Hi-Carbon​

Sakai Takayuki Hi-Carbon​

Yoshihiro Hi-Carbon Japan Steel(SK-4) HGA​

Minamoto Masamori High Carbon​


Out of these, which two would you recommend and why? Do you have first hand experience of any among them?
 
I got interested in a couple of monosteel gyutos at YuiSenri ALL "Made in Japan Knives" from Sakai/Osaka

Hisashige High Carbon​

Sakai Kikumori Hi-Carbon​

Kenkikusui Hi-Carbon​

Sakai Takayuki Hi-Carbon​

Yoshihiro Hi-Carbon Japan Steel(SK-4) HGA​

Minamoto Masamori High Carbon​


Out of these, which two would you recommend and why? Do you have first hand experience of any among them?
Haven’t tried them but sk Gyutos tend to be more similar than not
 
Got the Sukehisa and Masakane back Nicolas for handle refurbishing, now perfectly fit, they both cuts really well out of the box, so no need for serious work, I put on a relief bevel to test the steel, interestingly I found Masakane steel seems to be more wear resistant
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Not sure what you exactly mean by the burr forming being crispy. Does it have to do with difference in grain size or hardness?
It’s just how much effort I need to get a clear burr, Masakane is slightly harder for some reason, of course it could just be it is a 270mm…
 
It’s just how much effort I need to get a clear burr, Masakane is slightly harder for some reason, of course it could just be it is a 270mm…
Thank you! Have always been wondering about efforts in raising a burr. It appears with me even when the very edge hasn't been reached, as sharpie and magnifier show. No, I don't use much pressure when close to the very edge.
 
Last week I ordered a Sugimoto CM stainless 210 gyuto, but it will not be available until the end of this month. As a replacement, I chose Sugimotos equivalent carbon gyuto. Sugimoto All-Steel Japanese Chef's Gyuto Knife 210mm

How would you say these knives compare? Could the carbon actually be the better knife, despite being slightly cheaper?
 
Last week I ordered a Sugimoto CM stainless 210 gyuto, but it will not be available until the end of this month. As a replacement, I chose Sugimotos equivalent carbon gyuto. Sugimoto All-Steel Japanese Chef's Gyuto Knife 210mm

How would you say these knives compare? Could the carbon actually be the better knife, despite being slightly cheaper?
Can't tell you anything about the Sugimotos. But a price difference between carbons and stainless is perfectly usual and doesn't say much about its qualities. Sourcing of carbon steel is generally much cheaper, but that's only a small factor. Stainless is much more abrasion resistant. Machining of it is therefore more difficult: it requires more time, more abrasives and HT can't be done with the small furnace behind in the workshop as much higher temperatures are involved, and will often be outsourced.
 
Could the carbon actually be the better knife, despite being slightly cheaper?
That is quite the question!
Yes it could be BUT before one can properly answer one would have to ask:
What means "better" to you and what are you gonna do with the knife?

Just an example: A softer stainless for example can be better for some task than a harder carbon steel.

Also the price does not necessarily indicate much.
Nowadays mass produced "japanese" kitchen knives are made of VG10 and SG2 (&others) that have theoretically better edge retention than most knives we talk about here (low alloy steels). Therefore they have other disadvantages.

You see every steel ist just a set of compromises and as often in nature you can´t fool physics.
Thus most steels&knives can have their purpose and are not necessarily better or worse.

Looking at the Sugimoto, I´d dare say that the carbon steel vs. molbydenum steel will have better edge retention and hardness which is good for an allround kitchen knife unless you use it a lot on acidic ingredients.
 
Does anyone know what steel is used in Minamoto Masamori Hakugin Yasuki gyoto? This one: Minamoto Masamori HAKUGIN Yasuki Hi-Stainless Professional Gyuto

Yuisenri calls it "Hakugin Yasuki stainless steel", but that doesn't tell me much. How would it compare to Sakai Takayuki Grand Chef?
It says Yasugi Sliver steel on Kanji, so probably one of Yasugi/Hitachi’s sliver series, Ginsan, Sliver 5 or something
http://www.zknives.com/knives/steels/Hitachi/silver_5.shtml
 
Is it a good steel? How come the Yuuraku AEB-L cost twice as much, if according to site you linkes to, Hitachi Silver 5 is comparable to AEB-L?
Depends on the heat treatment, Ashi does a good job, also their grind is on point, not sure about Masamori, and I can’t be certain it is sliver 5 or other sliver steel
 
Depends on the heat treatment, Ashi does a good job, also their grind is on point, not sure about Masamori, and I can’t be certain it is sliver 5 or other sliver steel
I'm thinking of getting the Masamori in 240 as a daily beater, since Hocho did not have the Sugimoto CM in stock. With 20% discount, would you say the Masamori is a fair deal at just below the $100 mark?
 
I'm thinking of getting the Masamori in 240 as a daily beater, since Hocho did not have the Sugimoto CM in stock. With 20% discount, would you say the Masamori is a fair deal at just below the $100 mark?
I mean I do not have experience with it… but price seems fair and worth a try
 
Is it a good steel? How come the Yuuraku AEB-L cost twice as much, if according to the site you referred to, Hitachi Silver 5 is comparable to AEB-L?
Ginsan/Silver 5 is much closer in composition to AEB-H/19C27.
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Err, kind of in between AEB-L and AEB-H.
 

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