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Jose Luis

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Hi!
I thinking to buy a petty.
I doubt between some options.

Fujiwara maboroshi petty135mm

isamitsu-shirogami-1-kurouchi-petty-13-5-c

/hatsukokoro-hayabusa-zdp189-petty-15-cm

nigara-aogami-super-migaki-petty-shiro-kamo-black-dragon

What do you think is the best knife?
Which would be the one with the best edge and the sharpest?
Wich have the best cuttin performance?

Thanks for your advice
 
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I personally got a good deal on a TF Mab petty and love it. I did a bit of thinning and it’s been one of my favorite acquisitions
 
I personally got a good deal on a TF Mab petty and love it. I did a bit of thinning and it’s been one of my favorite acquisitions
One of my doubts its if TF Mab is a little thicker than I want. But I read TF are streamly shsrpness.
Isimatsu is thinner but I don’t know if it can be sharp as TF
 
What do you intend to use it for?
Multiporpose.
I want for small works cut some small veggies and fruits and triming small pieces of meat, small buttcherie…

Y have a pairing knife of 90mm but for some of this works is very sort
 
I personally got a good deal on a TF Mab petty and love it. I did a bit of thinning and it’s been one of my favorite acquisitions
What do you think about the Maborishi 15cm gyuto like a petty?? Too tall? Is a litros thindr than the petty
 
One of my doubts its if TF Mab is a little thicker than I want. But I read TF are streamly shsrpness.
Isimatsu is thinner but I don’t know if it can be sharp as TF
Isimatsu used to work for TF. So I think the steel would be pretty similar.

That said, I’m not a fan of their (isimatsu) finish. I haven’t touched it in person, but I looks too rough for my liking. I am also thinking as a pro and not for home use
 
What do you think about the Maborishi 15cm gyuto like a petty?? Too tall? Is a litros thindr than the petty
If you want a petty to do petty things, I’d just get the 135.

If it’s for home use and you want something more versatile, id take a look at munetoshi 165mm from JNS. That could check alot of boxes for you. And the the white 2 should get more than sharp enough
 
I also wouldn’t be worried about how thin the petty is. Most things I’d do with a petty wouldn’t have a chance at wedging.
 
Hi!
I thinking to buy a petty.
I doubt between some options.

Fujiwara maboroshi petty135mm

isamitsu-shirogami-1-kurouchi-petty-13-5-c

/hatsukokoro-hayabusa-zdp189-petty-15-cm

nigara-aogami-super-migaki-petty-shiro-kamo-black-dragon

What do you think is the best knife?
Which would be the one with the best edge and the sharpest?
Wich have the best cuttin performance?

Thanks for your advice
World’s your oyster, such an immense range of petty knives out there. What’s your budget?
IMHO, petty knife tasks aren’t nearly as demanding as with a gyuto—so, I tend not to overthink things like sharpness and edge retention.
I’ve got a drawer full of petty knives, the four I reach for most often are: 150 Yoshikane, SKD; 135 Takada no Hamono, b1; 150 Shihan, 52100; 155 Yanick Puig—all made with very good steel, nimble, nice grind.
That said, I’d not be terribly unhappy if stuck with using my trusty 154 Mac Pro petty—and still reach for it on occasion.
 
I agree with the above. I love carbon, but, for short knives that see a lot of citrus, I am happy to have stainless options. Edge retention isn't a huge deal with these knives because there tends not to be too much board contact. I also wouldn't stress about having the hardest steel for the same reason. In fact, something a little softer and more forgiving has advantages. For me, there are basically two styles: the Ashi Ginga mini-suji and the Toyama mini gyuto. I love them both; it just depends what I need to do.

If I had to limit myself to just one, I think I'd keep the Sukenari Hap40 165. It's a goldilocks in terms of being big enough for board work, nimble enough for in-hand tasks, very tough and holds an edge better than anything. The only drawback really is in sharpening, which is less pleasant than a simple carbon.
 
World’s your oyster, such an immense range of petty knives out there. What’s your budget?
IMHO, petty knife tasks aren’t nearly as demanding as with a gyuto—so, I tend not to overthink things like sharpness and edge retention.
I’ve got a drawer full of petty knives, the four I reach for most often are: 150 Yoshikane, SKD; 135 Takada no Hamono, b1; 150 Shihan, 52100; 155 Yanick Puig—all made with very good steel, nimble, nice grind.
That said, I’d not be terribly unhappy if stuck with using my trusty 154 Mac Pro petty—and still reach for it on occasion.
I don’t want spend more than 200/250 euro
 
Multiporpose.
I want for small works cut some small veggies and fruits and triming small pieces of meat, small buttcherie…

Y have a pairing knife of 90mm but for some of this works is very sort
I'm of the opinion that no petty really does 'everything'. But if you want it to be most versatile that kinda leands towards stainless if you intend to be using it for fruit work too.

For in-hand work a paring knife of <100mm will generally be better than a petty.
For petties there's basically 2 styles, high blade height (small gyuto / santoku) and low blade height. Low blade height generally is a lot better at butchering and other things where you want to turn inside the product (citrus supremes for example), and also works better for in-hand stuff. High blade height is slightly easier to use for general board if you don't modify your grip.

Length is largely personal preference but personally I'm a 180 fan. For butchering stuff longer is definitly better.

Personally I never cared for short petties; they're sort of 'in between' where they're not really good for board work but not great for in-hand work either. But other people love them.... that's part of the challenge, regardless of the style of petty you'll find someone here who swears by it. ;)

If you want 'most versatile' I'd lean to something with low bladeheight, for the simple reason that a petty with low bladeheight can actually do things that are annyoing to do with a gyuto, where as a tall one doesn't really bring anything new to the table.
 
This is probably unpopular among the folks here, but I really like my Messermeister paring knives. They might not be as hard or thin BTE as some J-petties, but I generally don't need that maximized for a small petty knife anyway. The benefits are that they are very corrosion resistant, durable and easy to clean. I often put down my petty and don't clean it until the end, so those are important qualities.

I also dislike the sharp heel that is present on a lot of Japanese petty knives, easy to cut your hand on it since the blade is short. Western knives usually have a nice bolster there.
 
This is probably unpopular among the folks here, but I really like my Messermeister paring knives. They might not be as hard or thin BTE as some J-petties, but I generally don't need that maximized for a small petty knife anyway. The benefits are that they are very corrosion resistant, durable and easy to clean. I often put down my petty and don't clean it until the end, so those are important qualities.

I also dislike the sharp heel that is present on a lot of Japanese petty knives, easy to cut your hand on it since the blade is short. Western knives usually have a nice bolster there.
Every one has his own preferences. My Wife is like you and Sheila don’t want use my japanese knifes
 
This is probably unpopular among the folks here, but I really like my Messermeister paring knives. They might not be as hard or thin BTE as some J-petties, but I generally don't need that maximized for a small petty knife anyway. The benefits are that they are very corrosion resistant, durable and easy to clean. I often put down my petty and don't clean it until the end, so those are important qualities.

I also dislike the sharp heel that is present on a lot of Japanese petty knives, easy to cut your hand on it since the blade is short. Western knives usually have a nice bolster there.
I have a few cheapish petties and paring knives that see quite a lot of use for similar reasons. Whenever I use them they often see on-and-off use where they get put down quite a lot, often without me bothering to wipe or clean them in between.
I don't share your opinion on the exposed heel part though.
 
I have a few cheapish petties and paring knives that see quite a lot of use for similar reasons. Whenever I use them they often see on-and-off use where they get put down quite a lot, often without me bothering to wipe or clean them in between.
I don't share your opinion on the exposed heel part though.
Do you use the exposed heel for anything? Personally I don't find any advantage to it for the user, only the maker (easier to make a flat bolsterless knife). While I normally don't like a bolster on a chef knife due to sharpening issues, on a petty I find them very easy to sharpen even w/ bolster. Plus I don't sharpen them that much anyway since they don't usually need a hair popping edge, steeling or light stropping is often enough.
 
Do you use the exposed heel for anything? Personally I don't find any advantage to it for the user, only the maker (easier to make a flat bolsterless knife). While I normally don't like a bolster on a chef knife due to sharpening issues, on a petty I find them very easy to sharpen even w/ bolster. Plus I don't sharpen them that much anyway since they don't usually need a hair popping edge, steeling or light stropping is often enough.
I use the exposed heel mostly on gyutos when I'm using it to peel / trim stuff; often I don't bother to grab a small knife. On the smaller knives I generally don't really use the heel (easier to use the tip), but it makes it far easier to sharpen the entire length of the blade. I was also never particularly bothered by exposed heels; never really cut myself on them. Especially on paring knives I also find myself cutting very close to the heel so I want to sharpen the whole blade.
 
Without reading through the whole thread, I would say don't be petty, it's bad for business /s

Awesome first petty knife.
 
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