Cutting a piece off a jnat

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Pie

you.. you got any more of them rocks?
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A cheap jnat, but still a rock. How is it done correctly?

I’m tired of the grit contamination from coarse stones on my atoma. I kinda wanna buy an akapin nagura but that seems excessive. My idea was to cut or bust off a piece of the binsui brick that I have to create a tomo, same with my amakusa. They were cheap mass produced stone so it doesn’t have to beautiful. Thoughts?
 
A wet tile saw will make this very, very easy. A circular saw with a diamond blade will also work in a pinch. Maybe try and find someone local to you, even a tile or stone shop, who will cut it for you.
 
Cleanest option would be probably be a water cooled tile saw indeed.

In a pinch, angle grinder with diamond disc?
If you have a steady hand it takes just a few seconds, even cheap discs that cost only a few bucks cut through an inch of concrete without effort.
 
I cut slates and coticles with a hacksaw. Should work fine.

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Thanks for the ideas guys. Might be something out of house at this point.

My white amakusa just proved I knew nothing about jnat edges tonight and I’m gearing up to jump face first into this again.
 
I vote for the hand saw solution. It is slow but relatively clean. Like others have said; get a carbide blade.

The fast but messy solution is probably something along the lines of what @Chopper88 said. If you have an angle grinder and somewhere you can get messy, this is an accessible option. I made a post about it here. It is a bit hazardous (obviously), so use care and good judgement. It can chip/fracture/break the rock if you arent steady or careful. It is also hard to make dead straight cuts. And did I mention it is super messy?? It is also quite messy. If you only want to do one cut, I recommend the handsaw.

As many have noted, the 'correct' solution (if there is such a concept) is the wet tile saw. Fast. Clean. Straight. But this is probably the least accessible option....
 
Yes, you don't want to do this without a place you can make a little mess.

How messy one considers this is to be is a bit subjective though, I've cut tons of bricks and other stuff in the backyard while renovating, it just floats away with the wind. Wear a mask to prevent breathing in the dust though.

In this specific case to get straight edges, cut a little wider than desired and flatten each side of the stone on a diamond plate for example.
 
A whole bunch of good ideas here. If I come across the right tool I’ll definitely give it a shot, I’m curious to try multiple slurry combinations.

I’m thinking the cuts don’t have to be perfect, just relatively straight. There’s plenty of stone to take off a little extra.



You most definitely are sir! A decent full natural stone edge has eluded me since the beginning. It’s pure vanity at this point because synthetics were literally created for this but on principle, I must explore further.
 
You most definitely are sir! A decent full natural stone edge has eluded me since the beginning. It’s pure vanity at this point because synthetics were literally created for this but on principle, I must explore further.
I don't even see that as pure vanity, but rather as a healthy curiosity and urge to explore! Of course, synthetics are perfect for this, but they also make it easy. And you Sir, seem to want the whole package...
 
Yep - just a hacksaw or Japanese pull saw or something. Not very difficult even on hard stones unless they're novaculites, you can't really saw novaculites by hand.
 
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Huh. That wasn’t so bad. Used a regular saw and ended up with a bunch of fingerstones. Japanese saw did the trick but the teeth might have suffered a bit.

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Hahahaha oh god what have I done 🤣.

Mud not quite as aggressive as atoma mud, but it’s nice to work with. Really the meat and potatoes of the experience at around 1-2k. Reminds me of a heavy Starbucks drink creaminess with the crunchy sugar not fully dissolved yet.
 
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