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ethompson

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Lots of polishing lessons learned between my first attempt with this Takeda and today - thanks nearly exclusively to the veterans on this forum. After 2 years of daily use/abuse on cheap poly-boards in a commercial kitchen and a couple chip repairs, it has lost 7-9mm in height. Now that this is retired to home use, it feels good to make it pretty again.
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kidsos

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Got some finger stones in from @nutmeg in today and decided to do polishing on my Mazaki. Definitely still getting the hang of it but it was fun. I did a sandpaper progression up to 1200, but did not go far enough as there are still some pretty deep factory scratches left. Next time I will try to take the handle off and do the sandpaper till at least 3000, but all in all I am pretty happy :D
 

ian

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Yea, all my hand sanding is done over multiple days now, usually while half watching a dumb action movie. “The Core” was really good for this. Alternate your strokes from parallel to the spine to perpendicular to the spine as you increase in grit, and don’t move up to the next grit until you can’t see the previous scratches.

And start super low grit if there are deep scratches.
 

kidsos

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Yea, all my hand sanding is done over multiple days now, usually while half watching a dumb action movie. “The Core” was really good for this. Alternate your strokes from parallel to the spine to perpendicular to the spine as you increase in grit, and don’t move up to the next grit until you can’t see the previous scratches.

And start super low grit if there are deep scratches.
Thanks for the tip! will drop down and start wit 120/240 grit somewhere next week and really take my time 🤠
 

Ruso

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I decided to tackle my Yanagi by flattening the bevel and put some "polish". I do not have any polishing stones so after trying few finishers I settled on Gesshin 6000S. This stone gives some contrast and does not mirror polish. This is a first time for me doing such type of job.

Original State of affair:


Naniwa Pro 400 was a poor choice, I've spend more than two and a half hours with it. I did not realize how much work were there.
Naniwa Pro 400 - day 1:

Naniwa Pro 400 - Day 2:


Naniwa Chosera 800 - Day 3

After Chosera 800 I spend some time on the 6000, then I decided to try 8K and 10K stones, but they were putting mirror finish and I was not looking for that. So I went back to lower grit, JNS 1000 this time, and then back to 6K. No pictures of that proccess.

End Result - Gesshin 6000S - Day 5
It is interesting to see how different lighting affects the perceived finish.

 

M1k3

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I'm not sure if you're rotating and lifting the blade to much or not enough.
 

soigne_west

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I think your right. It doesn’t seem to be so much of a problem for me on softer stones.
 

Hassanbensober

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I have a similar problem with a blade not polishing the way I would like near the tip. Mine is a grind issue and the cladding was ground away in a spot and the core steel is exposed largely on one side. Don’t think there’s anything to be done with it.
 

ian

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I think your right. It doesn’t seem to be so much of a problem for me on softer stones.
I find that some knives seem to decrease in width slightly near the tip as you go toward the spine, so it’s hard to hit that area when polishing, especially on hard, high grit stones. It’s tempting to lift the knife up to hit those areas, eg when working on lower grit stones, but that just makes it even harder to get an even finish there. I’m not sure I’d be trying to lift up at all. I mean, you want the bevel to be flat on the stone, right? This might be one of those times where it’ll be hard to get an even finish without dropping down to a lower grit and focusing on evenness of your strokes rather than getting the finish to look right there. (So, even out the low spot, don’t polish the low spot.)

I’m not that great a polisher, though, so please ignore me if you prefer since I only 1/4 know what I’m talking about.
 

ExistentialHero

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First serious attempt at stone polishing (be gentle!): http://instagr.am/p/CAbpoE2ncOr/
Had some old scuffing on my Wat nakiri, so I decided to try cleaning it up. Flattening out the bevels on a Shapton Pro 120 went pretty well once I realized I needed to dress the stone constantly--after twenty or so strokes with the knife, I'd start to feel the abraisive slowing down, so I'd give it a quick scrub with my diamond plate. I finished with a red Aoto, which left a nice contrast and a fairly uniform fine scratch pattern.
 
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