Why is everyone selling (buying too) 240mm Gyutos?

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Jeff

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Seems like 3 out of 4 k i es listed for sale are 240 mm gyutos.

Are
people finding them too large?

My go to is 210 or even 180.

I only go to the 240 when mus le is needed.

… and I hardly ever touch my 12” or 14” Western chef knives

(but they look cool 😎)
 

Jeff

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Buy 7 knives. Sell 5 you don't like. Buy 6 more. Sell 5 knives you don't like. Buy 8 more. Sell 4. Buy 3. Uh-oh! Mass drop! Sell 5 knives.


But ALL 240?

I thought everyone had small work stations!
 

Delat

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Plenty of people like 210s, myself included - it’s the most popular size. This forum just has a large proportion of 240-270 aficionados.

Most likely there’s just an unusual run of 240s on BST at the moment - plenty of 210s and smaller sizes trade there as well.
 

M1k3

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But ALL 240?

I thought everyone had small work stations!
I don't have that small of a work station and use a 260mm with ease. Much bigger might be an issue though..... unless I do things diagonally 🤔
 

Jeff

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I don't have that small of a work station and use a 260mm with ease. Much bigger might be an issue though..... unless I do things diagonally 🤔


** SERIOUS QUESTION **

Are you tall and/or is your cutting surface lower??

I cut on a standard height counter. I’m 5’9” and even a 240 is tough. It is much more comfortable with a shorter blade.
 

Delat

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Why does a length of the blade negatively affects your cutting? I would understand if the height did.

To me, a shorter blade feels more manueverable especially if I’m using the tip. Also when I set the knife down briefly to scoop or move ingredients, the shorter blade just feels less cumbersome and less in the way.

For quick prep jobs I actually like a 180mm or nakiri. For most jobs a 210-220. For big jobs I’ll break out a 240.

edit: I do have very high counters plus a thick board, so maybe that also plays a part. I also like a flatter profile because my elbow/arm isn’t tilted down very much due to the height of the counters.
 
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To me, a shorter blade feels more manueverable especially if I’m using the tip. Also when I set the knife down briefly to scoop or move ingredients, the shorter blade just feels less cumbersome and less in the way.

For quick prep jobs I actually like a 180mm or nakiri. For most jobs a 210-220. For big jobs I’ll break out a 240.

edit: I do have very high counters plus a thick board, so maybe that also plays a part. I also like a flatter profile because my elbow/arm isn’t tilted down very much due to the height of the counters.
This I can understand, but the question was specifically about height of the user and counter vs length of the blade. Maneuverability I understand, but OP said that he is 5’9” with regular height counters.
 
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@Barmoley

Plunge cuts are more difficult to do with longer knives and higher countertops.

To raise a knife to the angle of the cut, it's about 45 degrees, give or take on situation or preference. Some people raise their arm, or their shoulder too, or just their forearm. Then if we raise it higher then we are holding the knife in front of us midair . . .

There's just less control the higher up I have to use the knife . . .around my lower ribs is about where I like to be.

Something about muscle usage, putting weight into the cut, and body mechanics and leverage and stuff

Also I guess with a longer knife its farther from the center of gravity, or other stuffs
 

Naftoor

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Home cook with limited counter space here, and under 6 foot. I basically buy whatever knife interests me, regardless of size.

Currently learning to use a 240mm, extra tall catcheside. If I was a pro cook I would probably be more worried about the ergonomics of using it for hours a day, but for my purposes it’s not a problem.

If I had to hazard a guess? I would say it’s the most commonly produced size of knife, makers make it because it sells the fastest and most consistently. I would presume because pro cooks like big knives for making prep faster, and home cooks like to envision ourselves as pro cooks and think we need the same tools. We’re like city folk buying f150’s when the most we’ll ever haul is furniture made of an occasional head of cabbage. Plus everyone likes big things.

That being said, if I could take all of my current stable, keep the spine thickness, proportions and rough geometry but shrink them to 225mm I would happily do so.
 

Corradobrit1

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I'm 5'7" and use a 2in tall block. I find the natural arm position too compromised with longer blades, especially if there is significant curvature towards the tip. From a purely ergonomic perspective I find 210-230 blades optimal with least compromises. 195 also work very well but maybe a little too short for some jobs if I"m push/pull cutting.
 

Jeff

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Why does a length of the blade negatively affects your cutting? I would understand if the height did.

Because when rock chopping, or anytime when the heel of the blade is lifted, a longer blade means the handle is even higher

That would be less of an issue with a taller person or on a lower cutting service.
 
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I'm a home cook at 5'6" and blade height is definitely more of an issue for me, rather than length.
Profile, height followed by length is the order I tend to follow when purchasing. I like a flatter blade profile with a balance point at or behind my grip. Both of those are far more critical than length, to me.
 

chefwp

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I don't have that small of a work station and use a 260mm with ease. Much bigger might be an issue though..... unless I do things diagonally 🤔
lengthwise.jpg
 

esoo

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Canada, eh?
Because when rock chopping, or anytime when the heel of the blade is lifted, a longer blade means the handle is even higher

That would be less of an issue with a taller person or on a lower cutting service.

Technically, that is dependant on the curve of a tip. If the blade is straight, a 240 requires a lower angle of raise than 210.
 

jjlotti

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180 to 210 work fine for most foods but after using 240,50,70 they seem so limiting especially the swoop towards the tip portion comes on so abruptly after using a longer blade. The geometry just seems correct. Just be mindful of the back of your sink till your used to the length (been there).
Also everyone knows there's this.... chicas dig the long ball👍
 
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Here is my potentially hot take:

Many of the founding and most active members here cook and do prep for a living, where efficiency is everything, bigger knives 240+ usually make the most sense (cutting 3 squashes at a time instead of 1-2 is faster, etc.). Most of the pros settled on 240s as the best balance of use in a small space and amble blade length. Cooks, with their boisterous nature and credentials, drove the norms on the forum leading to 240 gyuto being the "default" choice. More people bought them, praised their virtues, sold them, etc. perpetuating the 240 cycle we see here now.

Im a 270 guy personally... I just find that extra length very useable when doing tons of prep (more edge length to use when things start getting dull, ability for a more robust heel and laser tip, lots of flat spot, etc) and after a week of use I don't even notice the extra length anymore and honestly keep thinking about a 300+. I think Jon has mentioned before that pretty much every pro in Japan uses a 270 for gyuto and that the shorter lengths are an American thing. I honestly think the current zeitgeist of taller and taller knives relative the length is a product of people trying to gain back the benefits of length without exceeding the 240 arbitrary cut off. I'd much rather use a 270x50 than 240x60.

Finally, anything under 240 is a petty not a gyuto, 270+ for life!!!*

* yes I am compensating for my small small pipi
 
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