Best S&G midgrit synthetic?

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Hi!

This isn’t a new topic but I found little info on some of the specific contenders here, so I wanted to poke you guys about it.

I currently have a SG220, SG500, Aizu and a few hard suitas.
I’m looking for a midgrit S&G synthetic to use mostly as a first stone on knives that are starting to dull, when stropping on the Aizu is not enough and the SG500 might be too aggressive.

Will use it in a progressions as well, between the SG500 and the Aizu, for both edge sharpening and bevel polishing. Although most days I’ll start on the midgrit. My knives are all blue steel, white steel and 52100, nothing too fussy.

My priorities are:

- Good feedback (I usually like harder stones because of this)
- Easy to raise a burr and deburr
- Even and consistent scratches when polishing (I’ll followup with an Aizu and maybe a Suita, so it doesn’t have to be a nice polish with contrast etc, just erase the #500 scratches and leave a nice base for following stones)

Doesn’t have to be super fast or slow dishing (just a home cook, not a heavy user).

I’m currently looking at:

- SG1000
- Debado SNE 1000
- Debado SNE 1500
- JKI Gesshin 1500 or 1200 (although not a true s&g?)
- JKI Maido 2000
- Arashiyama 1000

Any thoughts on these stones, or other suggestions?

Thanks!
Choppin.
 
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SP 2000

a 1000/1200/1500 is a too small step after sg500 i think. You can do that, but it's a waste of time if a 2000 will do the same for you

I edited the post a bit. Most of the time I’ll use this as a first stone to refresh an edge that’s starting to dull, when stropping on the Aizu isn’t enough. I’m thinking a 1000ish might be more useful here (might be wrong as I’m not super experienced in midgrits). Then I can refine the edge on Aizu, Suita, etc, as much as I need.
 
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I'll toss in a vote for a Belgian Blue; you can go right to it after the SG 500 for both sharpening and polishing and then to the Aizu after (if you find it necessary). Should be a similar or lower price than most of the synth recommendations that'll come through in that 2-4k range. if you want a synth that'll work after about a 10 min soak (toss it in water while you're using the SG), then I'd also recommend the suehiro/cerax 3K.
 
I edited the post a bit. Most of the time I’ll use this as a first stone to refresh an edge that’s starting to dull, when stropping on the Aizu isn’t enough. I’m thinking a 1000ish might be more useful here (might be wrong as I’m not super experienced in midgrits). Then I can refine the edge on Aizu, Suita, etc, as much as I need.
FWIW this is pretty much my exact use case for the SP2k. I use a 1000 if it's quite dull or chipped (my go to is a Gesshin soaker) but if you're in the 'not too dull but stopping isn't fully bringing it back' space the 2k is more than adequate. Can be a one and done for stainless as well.
 
SP2K was the first in my mind for this application as well. Don’t really have anything to add.
 
Shapton Pro 1k, cause I really like its sub 1000 finish for many knives, but SP 2k as others have noted is a really sweet option. And as daveb said why not both..
 
I think I may be the only one so take this with a grain of salt. But I like the naniwa super stone 2k. Surprisingly fast as long as you keep it clean. But it does glaze about every thirty seconds and then it slows to nothing. But glazed up like that it is great at deburring. Close second would be the Shapton glass 2k and I don't have a Shapton pro 2k but my 1500 would be a close third.

I have a Shapton pro 1k that I like for soft stainless. But for carbon knives, good hardness, I would want to go just a bit higher for a touch up stone.
 
I think the SP1K is pretty awesome. Its by no means perfect, but its a splash and go, has useful speed and feedback, works on most steels and isn't very expensive.
Why not the Glass 1K? For me the feel. I look forward to playing with the SP1K where I rarely if ever pull out the Glass 1K.

If you want something really zen, the Suehiro Cerax 1K is pretty awesome, but it is a soaker.

If you want something old school, the King KD1K soaked over night while a million miles from perfect, can be a great experience and its edge is pretty perfect for a lot of things.
 
For what you're asking, definitely SP2K.

SP1K, Cerax 1K, are very fast stones for grits. I'm just not sure how much of a difference they'd bring to the table when you have SG500 to fall back on. Cerax 1K is barely "slower" than it, and SP1K barely "slower" than the Cerax.

SP2K is the straightforward S&G that does what you want.
 
I don't own a SP1k. But everyone seems to agree that its more like a 700-800 grit finish.
I don't see why one would recommend this as a next step after sg500.


Next to that, my experience in different steels is limited. I mostly do crap stainless for friends etc.
I do have a blue2 and white2, and both didn't need a 1000 when dull. The grain is so fine, you can easily sharpen (as in: refresh or put a new edge on) with a SP2k.

It is hard, gives good feedback and does actually cut quite fast.

The first time a sharpened my blue2 @63-64 hrc, I started on a chosera 600 (which is more like 800-1000 I think) and the steel just melted. What a waste of steel that was.
 
really helpfull insights here, thanks. but i'm really curious about why most of you seem to prefer the SP2k before the SG2k. Is that because you just happen to have the SP, or because you have compared? How do they compare?

I'm about to pull the trigger on a Shapton 2k stone, but I might get a belgian blue instead …

.
 
I’d guess it’s by force of representation. Supposing a rather smaller population having tried both, SP2K is probably more commonly owned.

If you hit the Search function you’ll find quite a few direct comparisons of both. Generally I seemed to gather that they were quite similar for intents and purposes and both will usually get solid appreciation.

If you’re keen on keeping into SG stones just grab the Glass 2K.
 
I’d guess it’s by force of representation. Supposing a rather smaller population having tried both, SP2K is probably more commonly owned.

If you hit the Search function you’ll find quite a few direct comparisons of both. Generally I seemed to gather that they were quite similar for intents and purposes and both will usually get solid appreciation.

If you’re keen on keeping into SG stones just grab the Glass 2K.

thanks!

.
 
really helpfull insights here, thanks. but i'm really curious about why most of you seem to prefer the SP2k before the SG2k. Is that because you just happen to have the SP, or because you have compared? How do they compare?

I'm about to pull the trigger on a Shapton 2k stone, but I might get a belgian blue instead …

.
The SG and SP feel quite different. The 2k SG feels quite hard almost skate-y while the SP has a noticeably softer feel although it is still a relatively hard stone. The 2k SG also loads more readily than the 2k SP. The advantage of the SG is that it cuts faster especially on steels like SG2/R2. For many of us paying higher price for a stone that feels worse and loads more doesn't seem like a good trade off, at least for most kitchen knives. For tools or razors I think the argument may favor the SG but I don't do that kind of sharpening so I'm just speculating.
 
Interesting, I don't have loading issues with my SG2k. It doesn't do a lot of heavy lifting so maybe that plays a part in my experience but in "normal" sharpening I just haven't had an issue. I'm pretty obsessive about flushing the stone as I go too though.
 
Thanks, lots of valuable input here!

Main takeaway for me is that a 2k stone is the best option here. 1k would probably be overkill for the steels I have, would probably be wasting metal and I can always fall back to the SG500 if needed.
 
The stone I usually pick up when I need something in this grit area is the Chosera 2K. Likes it very well for carbon. Also has SG2000, which is used for hard stainless steels, but thinks Chosera gives a better feeling with carbon.
However, have not tried Shapton pro 2K.
 
The stone I usually pick up when I need something in this grit area is the Chosera 2K. Likes it very well for carbon. Also has SG2000, which is used for hard stainless steels, but thinks Chosera gives a better feeling with carbon.
However, have not tried Shapton pro 2K.
I have and use both. The SP2k isn't very far from the NP800 in end result, while the NP2k offers a final 3k or so. But the NP2k gives a more aggressive start. If you want to perform the final deburring on a clean NP2k, it isn't easy not to raise a new burr when abrading the initial one. Unless you raise fresh slurry and dilute it. The SP2k is very easy at deburring.
 
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Good question - seems like a good option.

For what you're asking, definitely SP2K.

….

SP2K is the straightforward S&G that does what you want.

NP800 is fantastic and could do well here… all of it never as straightforward as s’thing like SP2K.

I mean with a measure of work and knowing the stone, mids can accomplish various things well. And any suggestion interesting that way.

Since it’s been a bit « disregarded » in many answers, OP was not about following a sharpening progression from SG500 or anything but of basically cleaning an edge so as to « cross-step » to an Aizu (iirc) feeling his SG500 too aggressive and perhaps moving too much steel for the purpose.

That’s reviving… and that’s SP2K specialty and about perfect level of delicately behaved for speed and overall cleaning/reviving/finishing an edge.

I don’t dislike it in some polishing/kasumi progressions either. 😊
 
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