Cutting Knife Skills and Technique Videos

Kitchen Knife Forums

Help Support Kitchen Knife Forums:

Nagakin

Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2020
Messages
198
Reaction score
160
Location
Seattle
Not a knife trick but if you don't have a thermometer handy a good way to temp fish is with the back of a metal spoon/fork. It should be warm but not hot on your wrist.
 

DevinT

Founding Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2011
Messages
1,106
Reaction score
326
Someone please show me the best way to dice a mango.

Hoss
 

pleue

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2012
Messages
714
Reaction score
33
Someone please show me the best way to dice a mango.

Hoss
I cut both sides of the mango off the seed, score each side crosshatched like an avocado in hand and then push inward on the skin to expose the 'dice' and then slice it off the skin in hand. You can then cut the perimeter around the pit off in two pieces and cut and de-skin like a slice of melon. Eat the rest of the minimal mango left off the pit (the best part, like a chicken carcass.) Makes very quick work of it.
 

Alwayzbakin

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 15, 2018
Messages
51
Reaction score
114
Someone please show me the best way to dice a mango.

Hoss
I was about to serve a mango with lunch today and I remembered this. I was a bit distracted sauteeing asparagus and grilling cheeses and I certainly didn’t choose the best camera angle but I think it’ll get the point across nonetheless.
I do like the above mentioned “inside out” method but for when you need the whole cheek you’ll need another method. I’ve seen people using the lip of a glass that looks cool but I’ve never tried that and why bother if you don’t get to use a knife?! I like this way for having control over the mango: it’s easier to grip the skin and it won’t roll over when you don’t want it to as can be the weaknesses of peeling whole. Again just a rather crappy video of the peeling; hopefully most would improve on the dice
 

ian

Supporting Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2017
Messages
2,379
Reaction score
2,911
Location
Boston, MA
I was about to serve a mango with lunch today and I remembered this. I was a bit distracted sauteeing asparagus and grilling cheeses and I certainly didn’t choose the best camera angle but I think it’ll get the point across nonetheless.
I do like the above mentioned “inside out” method but for when you need the whole cheek you’ll need another method. I’ve seen people using the lip of a glass that looks cool but I’ve never tried that and why bother if you don’t get to use a knife?! I like this way for having control over the mango: it’s easier to grip the skin and it won’t roll over when you don’t want it to as can be the weaknesses of peeling whole. Again just a rather crappy video of the peeling; hopefully most would improve on the dice
Noone around here use a peeler for mango? I always do, then cut with a lot of rotation around the pit to get two sort of fat crescent shaped hemispheres.
 

ian

Supporting Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2017
Messages
2,379
Reaction score
2,911
Location
Boston, MA
From the Zwilling/Henkels Knife Skills book, my default to check when I don't know how to cut something up
View attachment 78222
Yea, I guess I usually just do steps 1-3, but cutting in the perpendicular direction and with enough rotation of the knife around the pit that steps 4-5 are unnecessary.
 

Alwayzbakin

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 15, 2018
Messages
51
Reaction score
114
Noone around here use a peeler for mango? I always do, then cut with a lot of rotation around the pit to get two sort of fat crescent shaped hemispheres.
I like ‘em quite soft. Maybe it’s ‘cause I’ve always got crappy peelers but I’ve found the skin to catch and tear off the flesh before it cuts. For a green mango that would be my go to
 

ian

Supporting Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2017
Messages
2,379
Reaction score
2,911
Location
Boston, MA
Hmm, yea mine are quite soft too, even wrinkly sometimes. Ceramic Y peeler here. If it seems to catch I wiggle it back and forth a bit so that it starts to slice to skin. Then usually one can finish the stroke fine with a straight pull.
 

Johnny.B.Good

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2011
Messages
3,166
Reaction score
52
Location
Northern CA
I never thanked everyone for the advice on getting thin slices of garlic. I'm not sure any amount of practice as a home cook would let me approach the speed and accuracy of Stringer, so I broke down and ordered the truffle slicer Michi suggested! I never do more than seven or eight cloves at a time, so I can refrain from buying the pre-peeled boxes full, though it's certainly tempting. I won't forget Ian's warning about chipping high-hardness knives on tough garlic skins though. I'm amazed I haven't had that problem in the past.

ETA: I'm surprised you don't seem to have the same issue I do with garlic sticking to the face of your blade.

This is a fun thread, so thanks again for starting it and for all the great videos!
 
Last edited:

Ultrafiche

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2020
Messages
60
Reaction score
11
Location
New York City
Have been really enjoying this thread and all the content posted, especially the videos from Stringer!

How to double rock chop garlic
With Ashi Ginga White #2 Sujihiki

Question from a newcomer: can any j-knife stand up to smashing garlic in the way demonstrated in this video? What about crushing garlic with the knife beneath your palm in the "standard" fashion?

I know these knives are hardier than the delicate objects some folks might treat them to be, but I was (pleasantly) surprised to see the smashing method in this video, particularly with the tip making contact with the board.
 

stringer

Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2018
Messages
754
Reaction score
1,159
Location
Boston, MA
Don't go bashing away with just anything. You need to ease in and figure out your tools. My point is just that if you have good technique and your knife is sharpened appropriately for the task, they can take a lot more abuse than people generally think.
 

ian

Supporting Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2017
Messages
2,379
Reaction score
2,911
Location
Boston, MA
How to cut corn on the cob. Or off of the cob as it were.
Aternative tip: if you have a small cutting board (professionals: what?) and don’t want to do it over a sheet pan because you’re lazy and the sheet pans are like so on the other side of the kitchen, it helps to cut the cobs in half first to make them shorter. Then when you shave the kernels off, they won’t fall from a great height and scatter all over your counter.
 

stringer

Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2018
Messages
754
Reaction score
1,159
Location
Boston, MA
Kaprow Gai

Kaprow chicken is one of my all time favorites. It's pretty simple.

2 pounds ground chicken
6 cloves garlic finely chopped
20 Thai chilies thinly sliced (more or less to taste)
2 oz soy sauce
1 oz fish sauce
2 oz peanut oil
8 oz chiffonade Thai basil
1 oz rice wine vinegar
1 oz lime juice

Saute garlic and chilies in peanut oil
Add ground chicken, brown
Add liquid ingredients and reduce by half
Add basil and wilt
Serve over rice

Here's how to cut the basil. I like a LOT of basil.

 
2
Top