Experiences with touch controls on ranges?

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Ruso

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I am thinking to upgrade my old electric range to an induction range. However, most of the options come with full touch controls now days. I, personally, would prefer the physical knobs controls for the "burners" but there are very limited choices for induction ranges with knobs when eliminating Samsung ranges from the picture.

So the question is, if you have or had experiences with touch control ranges, how does it work for you? Any issues with fine tuning? Not responding well with wet hands? The best experience ever, heck the knobs?
Any feedback appreciated.
 
Can't say I'm a big fan (not a big fan of induction in general, to be honest). I've had drops of water accidentally turn the hobs off at critical moments and then I needed to dry everything before I could turn it back on. To me it also felt a bit slow and unintuitive, but that's obviously subjective. The plus side, as always with induction, is that they're easy to clean. That said, the ones I worked with would start beeping when you got them wet or placed something on top of the touch controls.
 
Can't say I'm a big fan (not a big fan of induction in general, to be honest). I've had drops of water accidentally turn the hobs off at critical moments and then I needed to dry everything before I could turn it back on. To me it also felt a bit slow and unintuitive, but that's obviously subjective. The plus side, as always with induction, is that they're easy to clean. That said, the ones I worked with would start beeping when you got them wet or placed something on top of the touch controls.
I don't have gas, so it's either electrical glass top (the one I have now) or induction.
 
I used to be a gas fan boy, since moving on to induction I LOVE it....especially our Studio Line Siemens induction hob thingy in our new house works like a charm without fuzzy logic or finicky controls (have yet to read the manual after 8 months of use, I'd say that is pretty intuitive control)....Gas also fails when really wet, I do not see much of a differnce there (other than the explosion hazard when trying to reignite a gas hob that does not have an auto shut off valve) and the fact you pour far less heat into the room.

My high end gas range did not cope with stir frying well, this induction system can just about hack it when I take care with amounts, though I prefer doing Wok=ing outside.
 
Are the touch controls bothersome on your range/hob?
 
Are the touch controls bothersome on your range/hob?
if you mean me, NO....we had a neff induction unit that I have cursed so many times I do not care to rememember ;-)

This unit works, yes if you boil over enough the control will scream at you and eventually switch off the hob but nothing I cannot stand and I'm known for having little patience with stuff like that....
 
We're in the process of buying a new one too and I HATE touch controls like these. Takes time to adjust, no haptic feedback and no "feel", they just go nuts if you spill something and many work poorly if your hands are a bit wet. I love cooking, but I always get annoyed with these stupid inventions when I have to use them. The problem is that it's getting more and more difficult to find any without touch controls, so your selection of possible purchases gets really limited if you want to avoid them.

I hate touch controls in general though, especially in cars. Heck, I even want analog dials and no stupid screens in my car so I guess I'm just getting old and grumpy... :p
 
We're in the process of buying a new one too and I HATE touch controls like these. Takes time to adjust, no haptic feedback and no "feel", they just go nuts if you spill something and many work poorly if your hands are a bit wet. I love cooking, but I always get annoyed with these stupid inventions when I have to use them. The problem is that it's getting more and more difficult to find any without touch controls, so your selection of possible purchases gets really limited if you want to avoid them.

I hate touch controls in general though, especially in cars. Heck, I even want analog dials and no stupid screens in my car so I guess I'm just getting old and grumpy... :p
That's the exact gripe I have as well. There are very very few resonablly priced inductions with knobs, unless its Samsung.
 
I like induction, but my control panel is annoying.
If I buy again I’ll look for knobs…
The oven functions are fine but the range controls are stupid.
My biggest gripe is that it takes multiple touches to turn on a burner to a specific setting.
For example to turn a burner on to setting "6", requires 7 touches.
I haven't had problems with water because its on the front panel, but it can beep on if one brushes against it.
IMG_2173.jpeg

Whatever you get avoid freestanding ranges with the controls on a backguard.
 
I think @parbaked and I have the same range. It cooks well, the controls are annoying as hell. I want my knobs back! If you have a choice, I think you’ll be happier if you can find one with knobs.

It’s not great with wet hands, but it works most of the time. I’ve gotten into the habit of just drying my hands before using the range controls.
 
Was in a similarish situation recently. This thread might be useful to you:
https://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/threads/induction-cooktop-eu.64140/
The ones where you have to + through every setting are the worst and whoever designs that should be banned from ever designing a product again. Bosch tends to be better but I still feel like a pianoplayer having to push like 5 buttons to change a setting. We ended up with a Neff cooktop with some magnetic dial that actually works quite well.
 
These are the touch controls on my now 22-year old Miele cooktop.

IMG_5907.JPG

They work quite well. The reason that so many touch controls are terrible to use is not that they are touch controls, but that they have too few buttons, making the interface modal. A friend of mine has one of those cooktops, and it is a disaster. I can't just touch something and have the bottom left zone go up or down. Instead, I have to first select the zone via one button, and then (after waiting for a confirmation beep), adjust the setting (which is slow as well).

The Miele has a non-modal interface: the controls for each zone are replicated, so I can immediately change a zone by touching exactly one button. Holding down changes the setting in increments or decrements. This happens fast enough to be convenient, but not so fast that I can't keep up and release at the right time. To get a zone to the max setting immediately, I turn it on and press "-". That immediately sets it to 9.
 
These are the touch controls on my now 22-year old Miele cooktop.

View attachment 269677

They work quite well. The reason that so many touch controls are terrible to use is not that they are touch controls, but that they have too few buttons, making the interface modal. A friend of mine has one of those cooktops, and it is a disaster. I can't just touch something and have the bottom left zone go up or down. Instead, I have to first select the zone via one button, and then (after waiting for a confirmation beep), adjust the setting (which is slow as well).

The Miele has a non-modal interface: the controls for each zone are replicated, so I can immediately change a zone by touching exactly one button. Holding down changes the setting in increments or decrements. This happens fast enough to be convenient, but not so fast that I can't keep up and release at the right time. To get a zone to the max setting immediately, I turn it on and press "-". That immediately sets it to 9.
Yeah, this is a good point. It’s not so much that they are touch controls. It's that the implementation is so terrible.

Unfortunately, the implementation is similarly problematic in the significant majority of electric cooktops available these days.
 
IME, the implementation indeed is what matters, IMO Siemens got that right, and pretty good too
 
From your experiences what do you think about GE Profile implementation?
medias
 
looks doable yet slightly more complicated than needed to me.
Sliders are nice, that works, but front rear rear front does not make sense to me, does not feel intuitive and what numerical input or menu do I need?

All the hob should do is allow how much power goes into what (partial) zone IMHO.
 
Next level: integrated IR sensor in the hob = closed-loop thermostat (PID?) control.

https://www.miele.com/brand/en/tempcontrol-28475.htm

cool to see that coming to a cooktop, but i wonder how good the implementation is. only thing i've used like it is a controlfreak.

what i'd really like in a cooktop is realtime power output in W (measured! it changes depending on extent of coupling to cookware which even changes as you move the cookware around) and also the setpoint which is also in W. and you should be able to adjust the output setpoint with configurable profiles. linear and log would be good to include as you say.

and then also have a separate mode where you have temp setpoint independently controlled.

each 'burner' gets two knobs – one for temp, one for power.

power setpoint, measured power, temp setpoint, and measured temp are always displayed for all energized burners. always, gdi!

temp knob: if the temp is all the way down, temp feedback is disabled. you just control by power like on a normal stove.
  • realtime temp is obviously always displayed even when not controlling by temp!
  • if the temp is rotated, temp control is enabled. the main control setpoint becomes temp.
power knob: if the power knob is all the way down, the burner is off.
  • you have the option of clockwise or counterclockwise (like a valve) control. clockwise-increasing personally drives me crazy. i'm ccw for lyfe. it's a menu setting, and maybe you physically adjust something on the knob to control the position of the 'off' detent if you change orientation (either all the way on the left or all the way on the right of the range of rotation).
  • when temp control mode is enabled, the power setpoint becomes a power limit. you can control the max power output used to reach the temp setpoint.
i have many ideas for oven UX as well but am getting sleepy.


hey, miele, if you're listening, i'm available at any time to direct development of your next range and cooktop. will work for a few finished samples.

1695016332285.png
 
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That's the exact gripe I have as well. There are very very few resonablly priced inductions with knobs, unless its Samsung.
I'm about a year out from replacing my current electric and was gonna go induction. Are we anti-Samsung? I haven't deep-dived into the induction manufacturer research yet.
 
I'm about a year out from replacing my current electric and was gonna go induction. Are we anti-Samsung? I haven't deep-dived into the induction manufacturer research yet.
All the research I've done indicates to avoid Samsung for most of the major appliances, induction is not an exception. It also appears that induction failures are normal occurrences, unfortunately. Getting a brand with solid support and available parts is very beneficial and Samsung is not know to provide good post-sale support in the most parts of the world.

At the same time one can buy 7 Samsung ranges for the price of one Miele. I am personally between GE Profile and LG (LG because it has knobs).
 
but.. but.. the miele is seven times more pleasurable to use and lasts seven times longer!
 
All the research I've done indicates to avoid Samsung for most of the major appliances, induction is not an exception. It also appears that induction failures are normal occurrences, unfortunately. Getting a brand with solid support and available parts is very beneficial and Samsung is not know to provide good post-sale support in the most parts of the world.

At the same time one can buy 7 Samsung ranges for the price of one Miele. I am personally between GE Profile and LG (LG because it has knobs).
Thanks, that parallels everything I read about them when hunting for a new washer/dryer.
 

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