I ****ed up.... used a rust eraser on my brand new Tetsujin

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skahunter831

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Well I finally dove in deep and bought a Tetsujin Tanrysuen k-tip gyuto, which was delivered yesterday. Gorgeous knife. Until I ****ed it up. It looked like it had some lacquer from the shipping, so instead of actually asking anyone or doing any research, I figured my rust eraser should take care of it. Nope. Instead I just marred the finish and made it look like hell. Facepalm. How can I remedy this? I've since used acetone to wipe off the knife per Jon as JKI's video, and I'm not sure it even had anything on to begin with.

I have a variety of abrasives, including micro mesh, and have some experience with finishing generally (wood mostly). Does anyone have any pointers or instructions for how I can at least even out the finish and hopefully make it look close to new? Thanks!
 

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Pie

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My second hand stress is currently immeasurable.

This is… going to be a bit of a process to restore. My first instinct is to use sandpapers to restore the hairline finish, then fingerstones or powders to bring back the frostiness. One with more experience may have suggestions as to what grit to start/end at, and which powders to use. Uchigumori would be my guess. That’s way oversimplified, and maybe there’s a better way but that’s my guess.

There’s going to be some learning and a bit of effort spent on this if it’s to be done properly. Take your time, do the research, and good luck sir!
 

Pie

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There’s a first time for everything 🙂. Hopefully you come out of it with a relatively new looking tetsujin, and some some knowledge/skills gained!
 
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A lesson learned… It’s definitely fixable though! To temper expectations, you might never get the exact same finish, but you can get something very nice none the less.

@Pie is definitely on the right track. I’d suggest hand sanding this back to a nice even hairline finish, probably finishing somewhere around 2k or a clean 1.5k. Maybe some stone powder will be needed after that, but with the heavily etched finish these come with, I bet it won’t need it. From there you’ll need to try etching it. Based on the color of the core steel, I’d start with diluted ferric chloride.

If you need some stone powder you can PM me, I think I have some extra somewhere.
 

esoo

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Use the knife and don't stress over it. Get lots of patina on it. Then work to bring the finish back. Gives you time to research what to do, and as well see what happens as you patina it.

Part of having a carbon knife is using it, making it look like hell and then, if you so desire, bringing it back to "new". Carbon knives are living things.
 

skahunter831

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i’d suggest hand sanding this back to a nice even hairline finish, probably finishing somewhere around 2k or a clean 1.5k. Maybe some stone powder will be needed after that, but with the heavily etched finish these come with, I bet it won’t need it. From there you’ll need to try etching it. Based on the color of the core steel, I’d start with diluted ferric chloride.

If you need some stone powder you can PM me, I think I have some extra somewhere.

Thanks for the advice. Do you think micro mesh will work for this? I've seen people use them for knife polishing before.
 

skahunter831

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I think there is always that initial disappointment with any new knife where you use it the finish doesn’t look like new anymore. But then you just stop caring so much about it and put it too work. IMHO, this knife will look better with a good patina and some battle scars over a factory finish.

well-said.
 

skahunter831

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Use the knife and don't stress over it. Get lots of patina on it. Then work to bring the finish back. Gives you time to research what to do, and as well see what happens as you patina it.

Part of having a carbon knife is using it, making it look like hell and then, if you so desire, bringing it back to "new". Carbon knives are living things.

Also well-said! Thanks, all
 
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Thanks for the advice. Do you think micro mesh will work for this? I've seen people use them for knife polishing before.
Quite possibly. Going to depend on how deep the rust eraser scratches are I imagine. The key to a good looking etch is a very uniform scratch pattern. Keep your strokes tip to handle and you should be fine.
 

icanhaschzbrgr

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I don't think micro mesh is coarse enough to remove those scratches in a reasonable amount of time, but pics could be deceiving. I'd start with 320-600 grit and see whether its working ok or you need to go lower.
 

tostadas

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If trying to refinish, I'd personally try starting with 400grit sandpaper to see if it's enough to get a consistent scratch pattern. If not, then you will need to drop down lower, or spend a lot more time with 400. Progress up to maybe 1500 or so, then play around with stone powders which you can apply with a micromesh backing. The knife also appears to have an etch on it, which requires acids to redo. You can use lemon juice, but the result is not quite the same as stronger acids that are typically used, if you are trying to mimic the original finish exactly.

Right now, it may not look as pretty as the stock finish, but I think with a patina on the blade, you probably wouldn't be able to tell the difference.
 

ITKKF

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A side question: what was the correct thing to do to remove the protective coating?
 

McMan

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1. Sandpaper + micromesh
2. Sandpaper + micromesh + stone powder
3. Sandpaper + micromesh + stone powder + acid etch

I'd just go #1, carefully, since the issue doesn't go past the cladding line. The finish will never look as-new no matter what method you use, but you should be able to get a decent finish on there fairly easily. In my way of thinking about this one, you're just trying to blend out the scratches and not do a full refinish. With use, the scratches will blend more.

--Be very careful not to involve the cladding line. This opens a whole new can of worms because it'll change what the cladding line looks like
--start with higher grits wet/dry and work to lower grits. This is to help you find the best low grit without starting with too aggressive a grit. Something like 800-600-400-320... Stop at the grit where you can't distinguish that grit from the old scratches. (Check by looking with a light. Once you can't tell new scratches from old, that's what you want.)
--Then start your progression. If you found that, say, 400 was a good starting point, then 400-600-800-1000-1500-2000. The higher grits might not be necessary. Just stop at a grit where you think it looks nice.
--clamp the knife by the handle to a work surface. Sand in full swipes over the length of the blade. Avoid going back and forth--this creates "fish hooks" (J-shaped sanding scratches). Avoid the cladding line if possible.
 
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Benuser

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If trying to refinish, I'd personally try starting with 400grit sandpaper to see if it's enough to get a consistent scratch pattern. If not, then you will need to drop down lower, or spend a lot more time with 400. Progress up to maybe 1500 or so, then play around with stone powders which you can apply with a micromesh backing. The knife also appears to have an etch on it, which requires acids to redo. You can use lemon juice, but the result is not quite the same as stronger acids that are typically used, if you are trying to mimic the original finish exactly.

Right now, it may not look as pretty as the stock finish, but I think with a patina on the blade, you probably wouldn't be able to tell the difference.
You may consider to force a patina prior to any fine sanding.
 

EricEricEric

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You only need a natural finishing stone and etch with FeCl after to achieve the same finish. There’s a good chance these knives have zero low spots on them.

I would remove the handle use nagura bench stone, then suita and go until satisfied and keep the mud on the knife, then finish with jibiki finger stone.

If you desire you can etch to return the finish back to original

This is the fastest and easiest method, you’ll regret these sandpaper
 
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Pie

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You only need a natural finishing stone and etch wit FeCl after to achieve the same finish. There’s a good chance these knives have zero low spots on them.

I would remove the handle use nagura bench stone, then suita and go until satisfied and keep the mud on the knife, then finish with jibiki finger stone.

If you desire you can etch to return the finish back to original

This is the fastest and easiest method, you’ll regrets these sandpaper
Man… while I 100% agree with this, the level of skill, not to mention the stones, required to execute is pretty high. Not a lot of people have the polishing experience to pull it off on bench stones.

Sure wish I could, my first path would be sandpaper.
 
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Totally doable with a few hours of elbow grease. If you are nervous about doing it on such a high value knife, try refurbing an older one first to get the hang of it. Also be fairly careful not to cut yourself and don't spend much time on the tip or you will round it off

First of, if you can get the handle off without wrecking it do so, will finish cleaner at the machi.

Cover the other side with some good quality clean masking tape. If you stop for any period of time remove this tape and clean residue. Fresh tape every time you work.

Clamp it to an old pice of timber and go to town with sandpaper. You will need a backer. I like piece of timber with some leather glued to it for a tiny bit of give. Starting at 400-600 grit sand the effected areas and surrounds. Sand at 45 degrees to the existing scratches until they are all gone. (examine carefully under bright light to make sure scratches all run at 45 degrees. Be patient and don't move up a grit until scratches are completely gone.

Go to 600 or 800 and repeat but over the whole blade, sanding at 45 degrees in the other direction (so 90 degrees to current marks)

Rinse and repeat to 1200. Do your last grit sanding lengthwise again first scrubbing then lastly single full length pulls to remove all the j hooks. You can polish with powder at this point if you want more definition in your transition

Clean the knife super thoroughly and etch in strong instant coffee (Google coffee etch) until the nice rich black surface is achieved on the kireha. You can etch with other acids but coffee will give you the deepest black. Takes much longer though.


You may need to do a couple of etching and polishing cycles to really get some nice detail.

Good luck!
 

nicksoko

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Well I finally dove in deep and bought a Tetsujin Tanrysuen k-tip gyuto, which was delivered yesterday. Gorgeous knife. Until I ****ed it up. It looked like it had some lacquer from the shipping, so instead of actually asking anyone or doing any research, I figured my rust eraser should take care of it. Nope. Instead I just marred the finish and made it look like hell. Facepalm. How can I remedy this? I've since used acetone to wipe off the knife per Jon as JKI's video, and I'm not sure it even had anything on to begin with.

I have a variety of abrasives, including micro mesh, and have some experience with finishing generally (wood mostly). Does anyone have any pointers or instructions for how I can at least even out the finish and hopefully make it look close to new? Thanks!
Well I finally dove in deep and bought a Tetsujin Tanrysuen k-tip gyuto, which was delivered yesterday. Gorgeous knife. Until I ****ed it up. It looked like it had some lacquer from the shipping, so instead of actually asking anyone or doing any research, I figured my rust eraser should take care of it. Nope. Instead I just marred the finish and made it look like hell. Facepalm. How can I remedy this? I've since used acetone to wipe off the knife per Jon as JKI's video, and I'm not sure it even had anything on to begin with.

I have a variety of abrasives, including micro mesh, and have some experience with finishing generally (wood mostly). Does anyone have any pointers or instructions for how I can at least even out the finish and hopefully make it look close to new? Thanks!
dude you should never need a rust remover ever and the coating comes of with acetone
 
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We all make a mistake and learn from it. Either on sharpening, maintaining the finish or polishing.

I've also tried to remove scratches on my stainless clad gyuto using nagura stone after seeing someone do it on YouTube.
Instead of losing the scratches like in the video, the knife is bruised! Lols

Then I tried using sandpaper and finally get rid of the scratches.

That was back then.
 

skahunter831

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Do not start with 400 grit sandpaper if you just f’ed up the finish with a rust eraser. Try something high grit first and see if you can get it out. If it takes too long, then drop lower.
Yeah there's no way I'm starting at 400, the rust eraser "scratches" are essentially non-existent. I was already thinking I'll start pretty high then drop. If I do it at all... I might just let it ride.
Before using any abrasives, I'd start with acetone just to make sure that you aren't just seeing scuffed lacquer.

Already done haha. Unfortunately no.
 
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what grit is your rust eraser? If you have micro mesh give it a try -with a bit of water - sand heel to tip. If you aren’t making any progress you can always drop back to sandpaper.If so I would start with a grit similar to the rust eraser then work your way up. After your etch - either coffee or dilute Ferric chloride - I like to polish with sunshine cloth.
 
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