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It’s very specifically American cheese. Street food seems to be the biggest area, you can’t throw a stick at a street food channel without hitting an insane amount of American cheese even by American standards.

Corn dogs, breakfast sandwiches, toasted cheese, fried chicken, ramyeon, burgers, hot pots, rice cakes. I’ve seen them all murdered by processed cheese. It’s A) Cheap B) culinary fusion due to presence of the US military similar to spam in Hawaii bid C) mellows the heat while D) not being as pungent as actual cheeses which I’ve read tend to be viewed in a olfactory way similarly to how Americans might view kimchi, aka an unacquired acquired taste.
 
Haven't been to McDonald's since late 1990's. Used to eat big breakfast across from IIikai Hotel waiting for ice to temper after pulled it out of freezer. My friend Lance the banquet chef got me that ice carving account.

Never liked burgers that couldn't even put lettuce & tomato on them.

One of hot sauce threads on KKF someone praised Marie Sharp's Habanero pepper sauce from Belize.
Don't know how many bottles have bought over the years. My favorite is Smoky Habanero Sauce. I'm out of it now. Using this it's the milder version good ingredients less peppers & more of other stuff like carrots, garlic, onions, vinegar, lime juice. Janice doesn't like any heat at all. I add to my meals with Marie Sharp's I'm a loyal customer.
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Love that stuff—been my go-to along with Melinda’s X-hot and Secret Aardvark.

Habanero is one of THE GREAT peppers—good heat, versatile, widely available—arguably the most popular pepper for hot sauces.

Scotch bonnets are wonderful too, luckily I live in a Caribbean neighborhood where it’s common in markets.

Depending on mood, I’ll lean on Mexican, Caribbean, Asian, American sauces.
 
The mildly hot jalapeño pepper is good for your health. 30% of Mexico pepper production is this staple pepper. Roasted verde sauces flavor proteins or used as a dip put store bought green sauces to shame.
 
Aren't Scotch Bonnets a variety of hanaero?

Yes, the flavor is very distinctive though. Like comparing a fresh homemade toffee chocolate chip cookie to a saltine.

I’m Jamaican though so I’m biased. I use them without the seeds to get the flavor without the heat (or at least much less heat).
 
Yes, the flavor is very distinctive though. Like comparing a fresh homemade toffee chocolate chip cookie to a saltine.

I’m Jamaican though so I’m biased. I use them without the seeds to get the flavor without the heat (or at least much less heat).
Gotcha.

I haven't had any in a few years....they were a bit much for me never having had anything hotter than a cayenne previously.
 
The only pepper I find remotely interesting / palatable is the smoked Spanish stuff (Pimentón de la Vera). The rest just ruins the food for me, especailly since my capsicum tolerance is pretty much zero.
 
Missing hot weather months when markets are aplenty with glorious peppers.
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I don't think I've ever seen a Korean dish that has cheese besides cheese corn. What else Korean uses cheese?
They started putting it in spicy chicken... and ttokpokki (rice cakes).... and into katsu???? I think I've seen my sister put American cheese on ramen too .
 
I don't think I've ever seen a Korean dish that has cheese besides cheese corn. What else Korean uses cheese?
I've had cheese on lots of Korean dishes—from Budae Jijigae, to fried chicken fondue, and stuffed into Korean maki rolls, cheese jives nicely with kimchi, also cheese flowed over pork ribs, etc. Cheese is just an ingredient, cuisines are always evolving, which is a great thing.
 
Soy my Pantry Frontline lady is from Thailand. She used to cook curries to die for with lemongrass, kaffer lime leaves & smoking hot. Richard & I would be sweating mouth burning she was used to eating that way. Now years later has toned down the heat because she is in 70's too & can't handle the fire 🔥 anymore. Richard gives her cheap rent top part of his house. We never turn down a meal from her cooked up in a carbon steel wok.
 
I vividly recall the Thail lady from the takeaway only shop when living in Amsterdam in my twenties asking me (after a couple of take-out meals) 'you like spicy food yes?, I will cook special dish for you'....

I still break a sweat recalling the experience.....I guess I'm now more accustomed to hot food but it was darn hot, still the flavors were heavenly and likely due to the use of varisou different chillies.

now back to the program of unpopular opinions;

very spicy food is not for foodies as you cannot taste anything other than HOT
 
very spicy food is not for foodies as you cannot taste anything other than HOT
Perhaps some unsalted potatoes boiled in water would be more to your taste 😵‍💫

Spicy (picante…piquant) food is delicious and when done right includes flavors you can only get from chilis, but only if you’ve developed your palate. Not to mention the chili high. Sure adding a bunch of reapers and jolokias is not doing it right, but that’s an acquired taste.
 
very spicy food is not for foodies as you cannot taste anything other than HOT

Fighting words…. Let the flogging commence!

Not being able to take very spicy just means you are lower on the foodie chain and have not gained enough exp.

The beating will continue until morale improves.
 
Perhaps some unsalted potatoes boiled in water would be more to your taste 😵‍💫

Spicy (picante…piquant) food is delicious and when done right includes flavors you can only get from chilis, but only if you’ve developed your palate. Not to mention the chili high. Sure adding a bunch of reapers and jolokias is not doing it right, but that’s an acquired taste.
It's not 'developing a palate', it's 'developing a resistance to a toxin'. If some people find that to be tasty sure go right ahead but let's not act as if it's some kind of show of culinary refinement or maturity.
 
very spicy food is not for foodies as you cannot taste anything other than HOT
Firstly, I'm not fond of the term 'foodie,' ranks up there with 'influencer' in my book.
Secondly, depends on what culinary culture(s) the foodies you speak of are anchored. Perhaps for most occidental tastes, peppers obliterate tastes—but typically not so for foodies into chili-centric cuisines.
Admittedly, I'm disappointed when trendy or upscale restaurants catering to occidental eaters often dumb down the chilies/heat/funkiness of Asian dishes.
 
It's not 'developing a palate', it's 'developing a resistance to a toxin'. If some people find that to be tasty sure go right ahead but let's not act as if it's some kind of show of culinary refinement or maturity.
Ever had these spicy Dutch snacks?
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