Hasegawa vs Hinoki?

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10160

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hello, looking for a new cutting board for my sg2 and vg10 knives. The choices are narrowed down to a Hasegawa FSR, Hasegawa FSB, and a Hinoki board. (also looking at a Tenryo hi-soft board from mtckitchen).
Which one of these would you recommend? The most important thing is obviously edge retention, but something that doesn't require TOO much care would be a plus. and won't warp.
 
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I use both hasegawa fsb, the brown one, and hinoki.

Hinoki is softer and lighter. Hasegawa is a much better board. Sturdy, soft enough, durable, doesn't stain much, doesn't warp,.doesn't score as easily.
 

10160

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I use both hasegawa fsb, the brown one, and hinoki.

Hinoki is softer and lighter. Hasegawa is a much better board. Sturdy, soft enough, durable, doesn't stain much, doesn't warp,.doesn't score as easily.
what are the cons of hinoki that the hasegawa seems to solve?
 

Corradobrit1

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Never used a Hinoki board only a Hasegawa FSB (Brown) and end grain Walnut. Of the the two boards I prefer using the end grain. Better feedback, edge slides over the surface without 'grabbing'. The Hasegawa has some advantages thats its MUCH lighter so better for moving produce around the kitchen, can be put in the dishwasher if absolutely necessary and requires little to no maintenance.
Given the construction of the Hinoki I suspect warpage will be the biggest concern followed by staining. In a home kitchen these would be dealbreakers for me.
 

btbyrd

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Hinoki scores easily, stains easily, and you have to be somewhat careful about how much water you expose it to because the open ends of the grain (usually on the side of the board) will suck up moisture. And you can bleach a Hasegawa and stick it in the dishwasher. Hinoki are okay, but if I could only have one, it'd be a Hasegawa.
 
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